Time Capsule is in the ground, waiting for 50 years from now

Written by  Wednesday, 23 May 2018 10:19
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Everyone who was on hand took a turn filling in the hole to cover up the capsule. Photo Paul Wash Everyone who was on hand took a turn filling in the hole to cover up the capsule. Photo Paul Wash

In 50 years (ie Canada’s 200th birthday), people will be gathering at Centennial Park in Harrowsmith to dig up a stainless steel treasure trove that will give them a snapshot of what life was like here in 2017/18.

Mayor Ron Vandewal, along with members of Council, other dignitaries and a group of school kids gathered last Friday to bury a Canada 150 project — a Time Capsule containing all sorts of things that will tell residents 50 years from now a story about how things were five decades ago.

“This is an exciting day,” said Vandewal, with shovel in hand. “I’m so glad my grandchildren are here.”

Along with copies of newspapers and various documents relating to municipal government and organizations in existence now, Vandewal said he felt obligated to include his own tax bill.

“I’m sure they’re going to say ‘holy . . ., that’s all they paid in taxes?’” he said.

And if any of the future folks wonder if said tax bill was paid, Vandewal had an answer for them.

“Not yet,” he said.

There are also plenty of photographs and letters to future family members.

“I’m hoping my grandchildren will be there to help dig it up,” he said. “This is all for future generations.

“I’d like to say thank you to the volunteers who worked on this, the staff members and sponsors.”

The sponsors were D. Martin Welding who contributed the capsule itself and Campbell Monument Company who contributed the granite plaque.

Amanda Pantry was the staff member who oversaw the project, collecting things to put into the capsule and making sure everything got done.

She agreed it was an “exciting day” but confessed that it really hadn’t sunk in for her yet.

“The legacy of this? I haven’t really had time to think about that yet because my focus was on getting it in the ground,” she said.

And while a lot of the content in the capsule hasn’t been revealed (a common practice with such things), Public Works Manager Mark Segsworth’s contribution is public knowledge and will likely get a chuckle from future generations.

Segsworth’s contribution? South Frontenac garbage bag tags.

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