Featured News

Minister Meets mayor On Hot Bridge

Minister Meets mayor On Hot Bridge

Ontario Minister of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs, Jeff Leal, was in Sharbot Lake briefly on a hot Tuesday morning to announce a new round of infrastructure funding. Using the backdrop of a pro...

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The Trousdales of Sydenham

The Trousdales of Sydenham

Written By: News Staff | Published: July-30-2015 | Category: 150 Years Anniversary
Tagged Under: Sydenham, People, Frontenac150

The Trousdale family is known for the iconic Trousdale General Store, which is still operating as a gift store, as well as for the Home Hardware and Foodland stores in Sydenham. However, it turns out...

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11th annual Canadian Guitar Festival

11th annual Canadian Guitar Festival

Written By: News Staff | Published: July-30-2015 | Category: SOUTH FRONTENAC
Tagged Under: Sydenham, Arts & Culture

The date change for this year’s 11th installment of the Canadian Guitar Festival, which takes place at Loughborough Lake Holiday Park just south of Sydenham, in no way affected the turnout for the ann...

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Farming and activism takes local farmer across the world

Farming and activism takes local farmer across the world

Written By: News Staff | Published: July-30-2015 | Category: FRONTENAC COUNTY
Tagged Under: Agriculture, Howe Island

Early Sunday morning Ayla Fenton meets the van from Roots Down Organic Farm at the busy Memorial Centre Farmers Market in Kingston, where she will set up and vend produce into the afternoon. She is an...

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New artist debuts at Bon Echo Art Show

New artist debuts at Bon Echo Art Show

One of the great things about the annual Bon Echo Art Exhibition & Sale is that there is always something for everyone. The show, which is now in its 20th year and took place at Bon Echo Provincia...

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Subway franchise celebrates 1st anniversary

Rachel Hosseini, the owner and operator of Sharbot Lake's Subway franchise, marked the business's fi...

The buzz about bees

At the Sharbot Lake Property Association’s annual general meeting, which took place on July 18 at St...

The Comedy of Errors

The lively cast of the Company of Fools’ production of William Shakespeare's “The Comedy of Errors” ...

Frontenac County fails in bid to quash Gutowski lawsuit

Lawyers for Frontenac County have gone all the way to the Supreme Court of Canada to assert that sta...

Frontenac County fails in bid to quash Gutowski lawsuit

Lawyers for Frontenac County have gone all the way to the Supreme Court of Canada to assert that sta...

Wayne Robinson: bridging the rural-urban gap

Last year, Wayne Robinson stepped back from his role as CEO of Robinson Asset Management, a company ...

Blue Skies Music Festival

The 42nd Blue Skies Music Festival is all set for another magical weekend. The volunteer-run festiva...

Addington Highlands Council votes yes to supporting wind turbines

On Monday night, July 20 in Flinton, Addington Highlands Council voted yes to signing a support agre...

Maggie Clark receives 150th anniversary scholarship

At the regular county council meeting in Sydenham on July 15, former South Frontenac mayor and count...

SFCSC's annual golf tourney at Rivendell

Ninety-five golfers participated in this year’s Southern Frontenac Community Services’ annual Family...

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Letters

  • SLPOA Needs Support
    July 18 was a fine day. At 10am my husband, Carl Conboy, and I attended the annual general meeting of the Sharbot Lake Property Owners Association (SLPOA) at St. James Church. Everyone had lots of table space; there was tea and coffee and lots of chatter and buzz. For those…
    Written on Thursday, 30 July 2015 01:27 in Letters
  • Wild Parsnip
    Regarding the Wild Parsnip that is all over Ontario: the township offices could get thousands of 3 x 5 inch coloured pictures printed of this nasty weed and enclose one copy with each receipt of the current land taxes we are all paying. After all, it is the land owners…
    Written on Wednesday, 22 July 2015 22:14 in Letters
More Letters

EDITORIALS

  • Odds and sods as Flinton decision day nears
    A lot has been written and said about the proposals for wind turbines in Addington Highlands and North Frontenac. Most of the strongest, and certainly the loudest, points have been made by those who oppose the very idea of wind turbines in the region. One of the reasons for this…
    Written on Thursday, 16 July 2015 01:55 in Editorials
  • Verona Still Reeling From Tragic Car Crash
    Everywhere in the Sydenham High School catchment area, the communities are still reeling from the car crash that happened on Rutledge Road at 10:45 at night on June 16. The crash took two lives and left Verona teen Tyler Parr in a fight for his life, a fight he is,…
    Written on Thursday, 09 July 2015 22:43 in Editorials
More Editorials

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50 STORIES 150 YEARS

The Trousdales of Sydenham

The Trousdales of Sydenham

The Trousdale family is known for the iconic Trousdale General Store, which is still operating as a gift store, as well as for the Home Hardware and Foodland stores in Sydenham. However, it turns out that although the family has been in the retail business for a pretty long time...

Wayne Robinson: bridging the rural-urban gap

Last year, Wayne Robinson stepped back from his role as CEO of Robinson Asset Management, a company that manages money from across the globe out of an office in Sharbot Lake. While most of the other Ontario companies that do that kind of work are based in Toronto, and perhaps Ottawa, Robinson's remains based in a small rural community, where it is one of the larger employers. The company had its genesis managing the retirement income of local teachers by investing in real estate, but has grown into global markets over the last 30 years. When we interviewed Wayne for this article, we talked in his office, not so much about his company, but about his upbringing on a farm in the Bradshaw area outside of Tichborne, and also about the prospects for communities in Frontenac County and elsewhere in rural Ontario. Wayne Robinson was born at home on the farm in the late 1940s, the seventh son of a Catholic farming family. When he thinks back to his childhood he considers that he came along at a 'relatively prosperous time' in the history of the region, even though it has always been an economically disadvantaged area. “There was work off the farm for my father, so while we sort of made a go of it as a dairy and mixed farm, there was other money coming in, which was not the case a generation earlier. My father worked for McConnells and my brothers all got jobs in construction before they went off to do other things.” He also remembers the way the family finances were handled. “My brothers brought their pay envelopes home unopened and laid them on the table. My mother made sure they had everything they needed, and spending money on the weekend, etc., and that was that.” In those days, the small towns in Central Frontenac, such as Parham and Mountain Grove, were self- contained small communities unto themselves “Tichborne was prosperous, because of the railroad station and the junction between two railways. There was a hotel, a bank, a theatre, four stores. It really catered to travelers.” With the loss of the railroad and the resulting tendency for people to drive to Kingston or Ottawa to work and shop, the towns in what is now Central Frontenac have maintained their community ties, but are not as strong as they once were. “Economics have no morals. People will always buy the best product at the lowest price, or what they think is the best product at what they think is the lowest price; there is nothing anyone can do about that. So they drive off to Costco, and while they are in Kingston they have a day out as well.” But, he says, rural centers can and will survive, even if some of the back room operators in Toronto and Ottawa privately think that there is no future for rural Ontario. “You take Sharbot Lake, for example. You can live here, and live a good life here. I think it has a future, but it concerns me when I talk to people who are connected to the top levels of government who think that Toronto is the only center of growth in Ontario and that it should be some kind of city-state.” What they don't understand, according to Robinson, is that goods are created outside of Toronto; food comes from farms and is not made in the store. “The thing that makes me feel that there is a future is that people can make a go of business here, and what other business people need to do is to let people who are thinking about doing something know that there is support here; that the township is willing to help out. And there are people doing that, with an Internet connection and a good idea and a sense that this is a good place to live.” One problem is that those businesses cannot be sold easily when the owner decides to stop or to retire. “We see that with farms and with other businesses like that. There is no one to take over. But still I feel optimistic that there is a future in rural communities as long as we keep encouraging each other to keep going and make sure that people feel we will support them if they take a chance.”

Thomas Neal, a son remembers

Municipal amalgamation brought the end of an era for many long-serving local politicians. None served longer than Thomas Neal, who sat on Frontenac County Council for 34 years and was reeve of the former Barrie Township from 1967 until amalgamation in 1998. He served as warden in 1972, and sat on Barrie Council for two other terms in the 1950s. According to Neal's son, Thomas Jr., his father's 34 years as county council member is a record and he was also the only county warden to ever come from Barrie Township. Thomas Sr. was born in 1913 and moved to Harlowe from Kingston as a young child. He ran the general store in Harlowe, and kept the store going for over 50 years. It closed after he died in 2001, as he had wished. Among the sundry goods that were sold in the store, they sold moccasins that were made in St. Emile, Quebec. “We sold moccasins to people from all over the world, tourists from everywhere, and Dad loved selling moccasins. We took deliveries sometimes three days a week,” said Thomas Jr., who now lives in Northbrook. “And he ran the township out of the store. It was the kind of place where people would come in and buy groceries and talk to Dad about whatever problems they were having. For him municipal politics was a seven-day a week commitment,” said Thomas. In those days there were no paved roads in the area, and under Thomas Neal, a tar and chip program was initiated. He was also able to convince the province, with the help of J.R. Simonett, to build the Harlowe Road to join Henderson Road with Highway 41. Later on, when the Barrie hall and municipal office was built at Highway 41, the township became more centered around the business center of the township at Cloyne. “Dad had a lot of help from my mother, and us kids, in the store, which was a real going concern, because he loved being there for the people of Barrie Township. He was also the president of the Legion,” Thomas Jr. said. When some Crown Land opened up there were lots of cottages built in the townships and Thomas Jr. remembers his father working on the committee of adjustment and helping develop new lots and new cottages in the township. “A lot of business came into the township in those years. He also sat on all the committees of the county, and eventually they called him the Dean of Frontenac County because he had been there for so long.” Neal also worked very closely with Kaladar township in Lennox and Addington to bring homes and businesses to the area and build roads and a fire department to support that. “I remember that when amalgamation came on he wasn't in favor of it. He thought that the way things had been operating would be changed. Under him the township never had to borrow money from the bank; it was always taken from reserves. He would say that way the interest was paid to the township instead of the bank. He also was the welfare officer in the township, and if someone was able to work he found them a job instead of giving them welfare.” According to his son, Neal also favored joining with Kaladar because of the business and service connections between the two townships, but the province insisted otherwise. Thomas Neal carried out the final negotiations for amalgamation on behalf of Barrie Township and retired from politics at the age of 85. He kept his business going until his death in 2001.

Wilma Kenny: Sydenham in the Mill days and afterwards

(Many readers of the Frontenac News will know that for 13 years Wilma Kenny has been covering South Frontenac Council just about each week for us at the Frontenac News. Each week she attends the Tuesday night meetings and then crosses the street to her house and writes them up, often working until after midnight. Wilma has a lifelong history in Sydenham and Loughborough Township and we sat down to talk about the village and some of her experiences) Wilma Kenny grew up in Sydenham, on a 50-acre farm just outside the village. “I guess you would call it a subsistence farm. We grew all our own food, anyway. Dad was a beekeeper and he always worked out because the farm couldn't support us. He worked in the mines and then in the mill, until it burned down and after that he did shift work,” she said when interviewed earlier this year in the home that she shares with her husband Cam. The home, which is attached to the former Mill property, was owned by the Anglin family until the 1970s. The mill had been used as a grist mill, a sawmill and a veneer mill. The veneer was used to make cheese boxes for Sydenham and surrounding communities which all had cheese factories at one time, serving the small dairy farms that dotted the landscape. Wilma's grandfather was a cheese maker. She tells one family story about a day when her mother fell into a tank of milk. “Grandfather pulled her out, boots and all, and marched her home to grandmother to dry her off. Then he went right back and turned the milk into cheese. He wasn't going to throw away all that milk.” She remembers the sight of the mill burning, which she saw from outside the farmhouse where she lived. Someone from down the lake told her later that it completely lit up the sky. “The wind must have been blowing the other way because this house is right next door to it,” she said. In the 1950s she attended Sydenham Public School (later renamed Loughborough Public School) and then Sydenham High School. She recalls, in retrospect, that the 1950s and 60s were not kind to the village of Sydenham. “I think with the changes to the economy, the proximity to Kingston, the end of the mills and cheese industries, Sydenham was hurting in those years. Everyone who had any money was living outside of town and the town suffered.” In the mid-1960s, Wilma left for Queen's University, and eventually met her future husband, Cam. They made their way to Toronto and Vancouver and back to Kingston and both became trained social workers. Cam took a job in Inuvik as a manager of social services, and, now a family of four, the Kennys lived up north for four years. When they came back to Sydenham, the old mill house was up for sale and they bought it. “It had been neglected but it was not in bad shape,” she recalls. As they restored it, Cam and Wilma took great care to maintain the character of the building and that is evident in the feel of the house to this day. They found it had certain unique properties. There were taps that were no longer attached to anything, which they determined had been attached to a holding tank on the roof. Rather than a cistern, the tank was fed by water that came from the intake to the dam that powered the mill, and then was gravity-fed through the house. There was also electrical equipment in the basement of the house, because the water also powered a turbine to produce power, which Frank Anglin sold to village residents. “They used to run it in the evenings and Monday morning to power washing machines, but I think they did not run it during the day. I'm not sure why they did it that way, but that's what I've been told,” said Wilma. One of the reasons they came back to Sydenham was because a job was available that suited Wilma's skill set and interests. In the late 1970s, St. Lawrence College was hiring someone to do community development in Sydenham. Wilma took on the job, which included, in part, helping and working at The Triangle, a community newspaper that was already up and running, and served Storrington, Loughborough and Portland Townships. She also worked with groups in Perth Road and in other parts of the township to organize and establish services. By the time the funding for the job dried up she had taken an interest in seniors' housing. “I felt very strongly that seniors needed housing in Sydenham. So we did a survey through the township to gauge interest and need. We showed enormous need and we got the funding. Using the township as a flow through, we set up a not-for profit corporation and got one building built, and then a second. “The first building was called Meadowbrook, and had 25 units. We had property for the second one but could not find the funding. At that time I was back at the School of Urban Planning at Queen's and Chaviva Hosek, who was the Minister of Municipal Affairs and Housing for Ontario, came to speak at the school. I knew the professors and got myself invited to the reception afterwards. I brought our administrator with me, and we talked to her and presented her a letter. Twenty-four hours later we had the funding for Maple Ridge, which has 30 units.” There are a certain number of low market rent units and a certain number of subsidized units in the two buildings, which have been a great success over the years. “There are two things about them that are important for the community. One is they are located within the village so people can walk to anything, and the second is that a lot of the people who moved into them came from large houses in the village, which they did not need anymore. Young families moved in to the houses and instead of making the village older, it made the village younger.”

The early life of Don Lee

Don Lee says that he is not as sharp as he used to be, his memory is not as good, he can't hear that well, can't see out of one eye, and he has been slowed down by a stroke several years ago. At 95 he still remembers a lot of stories from the past, “but I can't really tell you what happened yesterday,” he says. Since we were interested in the past, that wasn't much of a problem. We also found out after the interview, which took place in midwinter, that Don still operates a chainsaw, and can even use up two full tanks of gas before putting down the saw. Don was born in 1920, in the house where he still lives, on the Ball Road, on a farm that fronts St. Andrews Lake. His father bought the next property over in 1879 and lived in a house there, but this property had the advantage of road access, and after purchasing it and extending the farm to 200 acres, he built a house in 1912. Don was the youngest child in the family, and he attended school at Kennedy school near the family home until he graduated grade 8 at the age of 12. In the midst of the depression there was never a thought of him going on to high school, which would have involved boarding in Sydenham throughout the week. “There was too much to do on the farm and besides money was not easy then,” he recalls. The land in the vicinity of his farm is still covered in open fields, even though there are few operating farms left. “Every farm had cattle when I was young. You could look out the window and see cattle across the lake, the place was clean, there was no brush at all. If land could be worked at all, it was cleared and used. Our whole ambition was to get grass for cattle. Although all the land in the region had been covered in White Pine, which had been cleared for the most part 50 or so years before Don Lee was born, he does remember there were some of the majestic trees left when he was a boy. Mostly it was hard work on the farm in the 20s and 30s. “We had cattle, and sheep and we always had a few pigs,” but they rarely if ever ate beef or lamb. “My dad would slaughter a sow in the fall, and we would preserve the meat in brine. We ate salt pork all winter, which I was not really partial to, I can remember that.” They ate potatoes as well, which they grew in a large garden that was overseen by his mother. “We would put by 25 to 40 bags of potatoes each year, Green Mountains or cobblers, not the small bags but the 100 pound bags, and we grew turnips and carrots and everything else.” They also grew corn, and in the fall they removed the kernels from the heads onto old sheets or old bags and “mother would set them out near the stove for a day or two until they were good and dry and then we would hang them in bags off the rafters for the winter. We did the same with apples.” The day always began with milking and delivering the milk to the cheese factory a few miles away on White Lake Road in a horse drawn wagon. “The milk had to be there by 8, we had to get an early start. But we never got much money for it, just pennies really. My dad used to say that if, when the fall came and he had the money he needed for taxes, and we had four bags of flour for bread and a bag of sugar, he was happy because he knew we would be able to get through the winter all right.” One thing that Don remembers fondly, beyond all the hard work and hardship, was the way people looked after each other back then. “People are pretty good now, I can tell you, but back then we were together all the time. If someone was injured, the neighbours showed up with food, we went out to cut wood, we did whatever had to be done and never thought anything of it at all.” An example of the co-operative economy was the way wood splitting was done. “There was always someone who had some sort of machine to saw up wood. Everyone would bring in wood all fall and winter and pile it up in lengths. In the spring the guy with the machine would come by and say he could make it for a week at some time. Everyone would get together at one farm and work for 6 or 8 hours. They would haul the logs up on a platform where the saw was set up, and they would throw the pieces off it afterwards. Some of the women would gather in the house and put a meal on at noon for everyone. Then we would move to the next farm, and the next, until everyone had their wood cut up, ready for splitting.” In 1934, two things happened to Don Lee. He got his first job, and his first glimpse of a curly, dark haired girl. The job he got was plowing a field for a neighbour, although he had to convince his father that working for someone was a good idea. “When my father was young, his family went through hard times, and he was sent to work on a farm when he was 8. They fed him, but not too well. He told me he used to get ahold of a clean piece of straw and keep it in this pocket. When he milked the cows in the morning he would pull out the straw and sip some milk from the pail when the farmer wasn't looking. So he wasn't keen on me working, but when I told him I was going to be paid 50 cents a day, he said that was all right.” As far as that curly haired girl is concerned, families used to ask Don's father if they could come on to the farm to have picnics on St. Andrews Lake, and he always said yes. One day, as he was fishing with another girl from a nearby farm, he saw a family from Bellrock out on the lake having a picnic. “There was a girl there, she was only 12, but she was a pretty girl, with dark hair just as curly as you can believe.” It took another two years for Don Lee to get to know Gladys Reynolds, but it turned out that she remembered that summer picnic. “I saw you out there,” she told me, “you had another girl with you. What happened to her?” (to be continued)  

NORTH FRONTENAC NEWS

North Frontenac Council - Jul 20/15

North Frontenac Council - Jul 20/15

Mayor Higgins encouraging early talk with solar company Mayor Higgins has been in discussion with U.S solar company SunEdison regarding the possibility of installing solar farms in North Frontenac. “They are very interested in coming to North Frontenac,” Higgins said. A repres...

Northern artists show off their wares in Plevna

A total of 18 vendors set up their stalls at the Clar-Mill hall in Plevna for the annual Plevna Summer Craft show. The event, now in its fourth year, was organized by northern area artisans Betty Hunter and Debbie Emery, who together with the 16 other sellers offered up a wide variety of locally made items including quilts, original artwork, unique wooden frames, stained glass, jewelry, felt work, hand made soaps and candles and more. Local painter, Cathy Owen of Red Dragon Studio in Ardoch, is one of the show's regular vendors and she had an interesting display of some of her latest creations. Owen, who has been painting for 26 years, spends seven months of the year in Ardoch and in 2013 she achieved her lifelong dream of designing, building and opening up her very own gallery and studio space. Red Dragon Studio is located beside her cottage on Malcolm Lake and it is where she works and sells a wide variety of paintings, cards, lanterns and glass mosaics. Owen is one artist who continues to explore new horizons. Some of her latest work was inspired by local neighbours, Bud and Mary, who told her about a fundraising event for their community association in Virginia, in which local artisans were commissioned to create painted floor mats to be auctioned off for sale. Owen was intrigued by these decorative and functional objects, which were first popular in the late 18 and early 19th century, when woven rugs were priced beyond many homeowners' means. As an alternative to woven rugs, floor cloths became a decorative way to not only cover bare floors and add colour to the home, but were also helpful in cutting down drafts. Like Owen's, early floor cloths were painted on canvas with both simple and complex imagery and it was not until the Industrial Revolution, when mass-produced woven rugs became increasingly affordable, that floor cloths eventually went out of style. In the 20th century they became popular again when folk art came back into style. Owen's floor mats are unique and are made to be walked on. Painted in acrylics with three top coats of varathane, they can be easily cleaned and are durable. Their subject matter includes what Owen is best known for: nature scenes like stands of birch trees; local wildlife, like loons and herons, and wild local flora. Owen loves nothing more than sharing her know how with others and she has been teaching for over two decades now. She offers courses at her studio in Plein air and watercolour painting and stained glass mosaics. For more information contact Cathy at 613-479-2137; This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or visit reddragonartstudio.com. For art lovers who missed the Plevna show, mark your calendars for the North Frontenac Back Roads Studio Tour, which will take place on September 26 and 27 and will include a number of northern area artisans.

Reid and Hillier endorse economic development

Local elected representatives Randy Hillier (MPP) and Scott Reid (MP) have voiced their support in principle for the North Frontenac and Addington Highlands Economic Development Group. The group, which is made up of investors, is preparing economic development proposals for the two communities in an effort to increase opportunities in the region while preserving the beautiful natural environment. The North Frontenac and Addington Highlands Economic Development Group define themselves as “a group of local investors and entrepreneurs who are dedicated to encouraging economic development that complements the Township’s mission and vision. Our investment goals are to enhance year round accommodations and associated activities for visitors and the residential community, provide employment and skill development opportunities and sustain our natural and pristine environment.” “There have been recent energy proposals made that would limit and negatively impact future development and further contribute to rising electricity costs for everyone if they were to proceed,” remarked Hillier. “The draft proposals I have seen from the North Frontenac and Addington Highlands Economic Development Group offer much longer term benefit, jobs, and tourism opportunities. “Wind turbine proposals should not go forward unless they have the support of the community, period,” added Reid. North Frontenac council has already voted their community an unwilling host for industrial wind turbines; Addington Highlands has yet to have a final vote on the matter.

North Frontenac Council - Jun 29/15

Solar project proposals abundant in the Frontenacs Rob Hitchcock, a representative from Abundant Solar Energy Incorporated (ASEI), made a presentation to North Frontenac Council on June 29. Two sites were proposed for solar farms in North Frontenac that would be built under the FIT program being offered by the Independent Electricity System Operator (IESO). ASEI is a 100% Canadian-owned company with its headquarters in York, Ontario. They finance and engineer solar farms, and contract out the construction stage. “Every site that we develop...we use as much local material and labour,” Hitchcock said, referring mostly to excavation, electricians, and general labour. Hitchcock explained how previous solar farms, such as the ones near Kingston and Westport, were installed when renewable energy building regulations in Ontario were much more lax. Times have changed, and the IESO now requires that companies awarded contracts under the FIT program follow strict guidelines as far as visibility from dwellings and points of interest, as well as incorporate green space setbacks into their plans. Unlike certain recently proposed wind turbine projects, electricity that is generated by these panels is fed back into the local grid, rather than being exported outside the province. ASEI is bankrolled by a solar flow-through fund (SFF) which offers investors a tax break on money invested into alternative energy, using a similar model to tax breaks passed on to investors in the oil and mineral sectors. In this North Frontenac proposal, ASEI is planning two separate panel arrays on neighbouring lots, both located along the Mississippi River, near Farm Lake, which are accessed via Gutheinz Road. Hitchcock explained that they typically overbuild their systems by 20% to make sure they are always generating the maximum electricity they are allowed to feed into the grid, within the regulations of the FIT program. “We're very involved in the communities we do business in,” Hitchcock explained. “The term of the contract is twenty years.” Mayor Ron Higgins confirmed with Hitchcock that the ASEI would be responsible for repairing potential damage to public roads as a result of their activities. The procurement process for solar projects, through this IESO program, works similarly to the wind turbine application process that North Frontenac has recently faced. ASEI are awarded points for having the municipality on board with the project. Their bid will become more competitive with a letter of support from the township. Dam leaks! Mayor Higgins and Councilor Gerry Martin recently took members of the Mississippi Valley Conservation Authority (MVCA) on a tour of some of the lakes and rivers in North Frontenac that are connected with the Mississippi River water system. Martin reported to council that the Kashawakamak Lake Dam is leaking and that the MVCA will be fixing the dam by pumping liquid cement “into the surrounding hillside” to hopefully stop the flow. “It was a pretty productive day,” Martin said. “North Frontenac Township was really highlighted...” He said that he has “got a lot of comments back...congratulating us on what we're doing up here and our countryside.” The Kashawakamak Lake Dam is at the east end of the lake and helps regulate the water flow of the Mississippi River. Linda's Loop Linda and Bruce Sterling recently sent a letter to North Frontenac Council asking for help organizing maintenance on Linda's Loop, a 20-km trail network built by the Sterlings many years ago, that winds along Crotch Lake. Historically, the trail has been maintained by the Sterlings and other local volunteers but they've found it difficult keeping the trail in good shape these last few years. They are requesting help in clearing brush, marking trails, and some chainsaw work and are hoping that the Township can help co-ordinate the maintenance. In October 2014 they built a 40 foot bridge on the trail with help from the Rideau Trails Association. “The township has much to gain by maintaining these trails and expanding them,” the Sterlings said, and suggested that North Frontenac could gain revenue as well as boost local business. “A lot of people use it...it's an advantage to the whole area,” a lady in the audience said. “She [Linda] has maps. They've done a lot of work on it and it would be a shame to let it go back. I hope they'll get some support from Council.” Mayor Higgins responded by saying that the idea will be given to the economic development task force to look into.

The long road to a big opening day in Ompah

A sizable crowd gathered to celebrate at the official opening and ribbon cutting ceremony on June 27 at the newly renovated fire hall and community centre in Ompah. North Frontenac councilor, Denis Bedard, emceed the event, which was attended by members of North Frontenac council and staff along with numerous volunteers and staff from the Ompah Fire Department, North Frontenac paramedics and emergency first responders, volunteers from the Ompah Community Volunteer Association and members of the community at large. Mayor Ron Higgins congratulated all involved in bringing the project to completion and he stressed that it would not have been possible without the commitment of the community volunteers, who together raised $50,000 to see the $290,000 project through to completion. “Our volunteers have assisted with the planning, presenting of options and justifications to council and have done a lot of the work here. What you see here today would not have been possible without them.” Higgins made a special presentation to Steve Sunderland, a long-time resident in the area who managed the project and whom some called the project's visionary and driver. He started off as a member of the initial task force, then later chaired the design task force and finally became project manager heading up the various smaller contracts. This plan came about after a series of painful attempts at replacing or repairing the fire hall, which included a plan to put in a new fire hall/ambulance base in partnership with Frontenac County (way too expensive for the township) and a plan to expand the size of the fire hall (too expensive for the township) Sunderland summed up the project that did get built as “renovating the two joined-at-the-hip, existing facilities as two separate entities unto themselves”. The renovations to the fire hall included two new overhead remote-controlled vehicle doors, a new covered and separate entrance way, a new heated concrete floor, new drywall, a brand new mechanical system and washroom facility, and new wash bays. The renovations to the community hall include a new 120 square foot foyer and wheelchair accessible entrance way to its west side, with a shelter for the outdoor mailboxes, newly renovated wheelchair accessible washroom facilities plus new lights and windows. The parking lot also was upgraded as well, with improvements to accessibility and drainage. Marily Seitz, president of the Ompah Community Centre, was thrilled with the new hall. “It's been a long and hard road getting here but it's been worth it. So many people from the community have put in their time, talents and energy and just look around you. It's just beautiful.” Following the speeches, the official ribbon and cake cutting ceremony took place and guests were treated to demonstrations courtesy of the volunteers from the fire department and a free lunch courtesy of the Clar-Mill Community volunteers from Plevna.

CENTRAL FRONTENAC NEWS

Minister Meets mayor On Hot Bridge

Minister Meets mayor On Hot Bridge

Ontario Minister of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs, Jeff Leal, was in Sharbot Lake briefly on a hot Tuesday morning to announce a new round of infrastructure funding. Using the backdrop of a project that received 90% of its funding from the first round of the Ontario Commun...

Subway franchise celebrates 1st anniversary

Rachel Hosseini, the owner and operator of Sharbot Lake's Subway franchise, marked the business's first year anniversary on July 23 by offering her customers a one-day special to help celebrate the event. Patrons who visited the shop on that day received a free 6-inch sandwich with the purchase of a second sandwich and a drink, and also a free piece of anniversary cake. Hosseini, who is originally from Richmond Hill, bought the former Rising Bun bakery and set up the Subway franchise after becoming familiar with them while working with a construction company in Toronto. Looking for a calmer, quieter life away from the city, and wanting to be closer to nature, she took the plunge and is now living and working full-time in Sharbot Lake. Currently the business employs 10 staff members - five full-time and five part-time. Hosseini said that the anniversary celebration was her way to thank the many loyal customers who have helped her and her team by continuing to patronize the business throughout the winter months. Hosseini said she is grateful for the way the local community has welcomed her and said that there is lots of room for the business to grow in Sharbot Lake. She said her first year has been busier than she anticipated. Her regular clientele consists of local residents, many of whom came out to celebrate at Thursday's event. Local nine-to-fivers in the area have been taking advantage of the business's early bird special that Hosseini and her staff offer, a six-inch breakfast sub with a small coffee for $3, which is available before 9am. The business also gets good traffic from weekenders passing through on Highway 7, as well as seasonal cottagers. Hosseini said that she traveled from Toronto on Thursday especially to be at the event since the business is “her baby”. She thanked her team, including long-time manager Alana Botting, who has been with her since day one and she looks forward to continuing to serve her customers in the many years to come. She said that with a full year now under her belt, she has a few new plans up her sleeve, one of which is to support local school teams and/or events in the area.

The buzz about bees

At the Sharbot Lake Property Association’s annual general meeting, which took place on July 18 at St. James Church hall in Sharbot Lake, pollination expert Susan Chan spoke about the importance of bees as pollinators. Chan is also project manager with Farms at Work. Her talk was titled “Introduction to Pollinators for Cottagers” and offered up a plethora of information about bees as well as ways to encourage their presence and ongoing health. When we think of bees we think mostly of honey bees, which are the only non-native bees in Ontario, but Chan explained that there are over 400 other native species of bees. Bees are a vital part of what makes our plants, flowers and veggies grow. Wind and insects are two key pollinators and native bees are the predominant insect pollinators that carry pollen from the male part of a plant (anther) to the female part (stigma), resulting in pollination. Pollination is needed to set seed in plants and is what allows fruits and seeds to grow, which is the main source of food for humans and for wildlife. Bees also pollinate the plants whose seeds are used to produce most of our edible oil products. Meat and dairy products are heavily dependent on the alfalfa plant, pollinated by native bees. “If you like your steaks on the barbeque, you are dependent not on honey bees but on native bees who pollinate alfalfa plants which are used to feed meat and dairy cattle.” She spoke about common myths about bees and the surprising fact that it is the non-native honey bee that usually stings, whereas most of the native species can sting but generally do not. They live in much smaller colonies; most live solitary lives and possess very low defense mechanisms, which makes them very unlikely to sting aggressively. Swarms are only associated with honey bees; other solitary bees do not live in colonies and therefore do not swarm. In fact, 70% of the bees in Ontario live in solitary nests in the ground and the other 30% live solitary lives in hollow stems. Chan explained how to encourage native bee pollinators by constructing bee-friendly dwellings (pictured here) using the stems of an invasive plant called Phragmites Australianus. “You can make use of these plant's stems as long as you do not transport the seeds from one place to another.” These condo-like dwellings will encourage solitary native bee guests. Chan spoke of various species of bees including leaf cutter bees, wool carder bees and bumble bees, the latter of which she called “the work horses” of the native pollinators since they are around from April to October. This makes them particularly susceptible to lack of food. Chan said that all bee populations in North America are currently declining. The two main reasons she gave are lack of habitat and toxins in the environment. She said that neonicotinoids are a problem since the chemical is transferred to all parts of the plant it is applied to, can take three years to break down, and is highly water soluble. Bees are much more susceptible to insecticides, more so than the insects they were designed for, because bees do not have a strong resistance system and they can come into contact with the insecticides when collecting nectar from affected plants and side crops nearby. Chan also said that butterflies and birds are being affected by neonicotinoids. On a more positive note, Chan suggested ways that property owners can help the plight of all species of native bees by planting flowering native plants, which provide habitat and food. She advised them to reconsider when weeding and to understand that all weeds are not bad. “If you can tolerate dandelions simply for the sake of the bees, do it since they (dandelions) are a great source of food come early spring.” She advised landowners to encourage wild blueberries and raspberries for similar reasons and to leave natural spaces to grow and thrive because if left alone they will become healthy pollinator habitats. If you know of pickerel weed growing, encourage it, because there exists one pickerel weed bee, a specialist bee that eats only the nectar and pollen from that plant. For those who love plants and food, bees are key and Chan's talk went a long way in encouraging homeowners to create environments that will encourage their health and abundance. photo 22552-  

Blue Skies Music Festival

The 42nd Blue Skies Music Festival is all set for another magical weekend. The volunteer-run festival is set up on a piece of land rich with history near Clarendon, off Road 509. Although camping passes have all been sold out, day passes for Saturday and Sunday, August 1 and 2 are still readily available. Day pass tickets sell for $35 at Tara Foods and Brian's Record Option in Kingston, Shadowfax in Perth, and Moondance Music in Peterborough. Sadly for Ottawa residents, the Folklore Centre is closed and will therefore no longer be selling tickets. However, day passes will also be sold at the front gates all day Saturday and Sunday. The gate opens at 8am as the incredibly varied workshops begin early in the day. Saturday the music begins at 3pm with opening act Shari Ulrich followed by the infamous Blue Skies square dance. Next, Washboard Hank & the Wringers with Sweet Muriel will hit the stage at 7pm followed by Catherine MacLellan at 8pm, Tim Chaisson at 9pm, David Celia at 10pm and Samantha Martin and the Delta Sugar finishing off the night off at 11pm. The Sunday schedule starts in the morning again. At 10:00 the annual Blue Skies parade will kick off the day, followed by musical and holistic workshops. From unblocking your dreams to plant identification, and from ukelele orchestras to Tim Chaisson sharing the east coast music scene, there is bound to be something for everyone. There will be a showcase featuring the Blue Skies Community Fiddle Orchestra at 3:00 followed by a square dance at begins at 4:00. The evening's music starts with the Blue Skies Community Choir led by Suba Sankaran and Dylan Bell, followed by The Young Novelists at 7:45, Karen Savoka at 8:45, The Bombadils at 9:45, Jaffa Road at 10:45. Finishing off the festival will be SWING at 11:45pm. The 42nd Blue Skies Music Festival promises non-stop entertainment, friendly faces and new experiences. Bring an instrument if you so desire, but most importantly, bring your open ears. For further information, go to blueskiesmusicfestival.ca

Toga-Toting Gang Attracts Attention

On July 15, six toga-clad “Greek Goddesses” attracted more than their fair share of attention as they shopped at local businesses in the Sharbot Lake area in preparation for their “Girls’ Annual” get together at Big Clear Lake near Arden. The ladies were spotted wearing white sheets in classic toga fashion, and were also adorned with interesting head gear like laurels, plus bangles and assorted flowers as they made their way through Sharbot Lake. The group, who have been meeting at the cottage of their hostess, Christine Seeley, for the last decade, decided three years ago to concoct a different theme every year for their annual five-day event. Part of the fun, they say, is coming to town dressed up and seeing the kind of reaction they get. Their spirited tour of the Sharbot Lake village attracted the attention of fellow shoppers and staff at Mike Dean’s grocery store, Sharbot Lake Pharmacy, the LCBO, Jossy's Chill & Grill and the Amazing Dollar Store. Onlookers very much appreciated the ladies' efforts. Several people asked them to pose for pictures and wondered if they could be invited along for the fun. Christine said that that past themes have included Bathing and Bikini Beauties. The six friends, who have been close since they were all just babies, said that the event is one that they always look forward to. “Friends are important and sometimes it's fun to do crazy stuff once in a while,” Christine said. “We always have a great time hanging out, eating, having a few drinks and always have some great laughs.” Asked about their plans for next year’s theme, the girls are undecided at this point but you might want to be on the lookout for six runaway brides in Sharbot Lake and area come next July.

SOUTH FRONTENAC NEWS

11th annual Canadian Guitar Festival

11th annual Canadian Guitar Festival

The date change for this year’s 11th installment of the Canadian Guitar Festival, which takes place at Loughborough Lake Holiday Park just south of Sydenham, in no way affected the turnout for the annual three-day event, which showcases some of the best guitar playing gurus from ...

Parking Issues in Sydenham

There was as a time not so very long ago, when one could park on both sides of the street in Sydenham, facing whichever way happened to be most convenient. Mill Street on a Friday just before closing time at the Beer Store was no place for the timid driver or the pedestrian. Although those free-for-all days are gone, traffic continues to increase and there are people who still park on the sidewalk in front of the bank or the post office, slowing traffic and forcing pedestrians into the street. Tuesday evening Public Works Manager Mark Segsworth and his roads staff presented their proposal to improve parking in Sydenham. One big change would be to make Cross Street one-way from Wheatley to Mill, with parking on the north side only. Signs and lines would make it clear where people can and cannot park throughout the village, and would encourage better use of off-street parking spaces such as the area along the road into the Point. Following the presentation, several people asked questions and made suggestions: the revised proposal will come to Council for their comments and approval in early September. Once the parking signs, lines and supporting by-law are in place, the changes will be enforced with public education, and with tickets and fines for persistent offenders. Segsworth and his staff hope to have the new parking program in place before winter.

Support Rinks to Links

The Frontenac minor hockey community invites you to be part of our 3rd annual Frontenac Minor Hockey Association (FMHA) “Rinks to Links” golf tournament. There are many ways to be involved, including sponsoring a hole, contributing a prize for the silent auction or individual prizes for golfers. Our fund-raising event will be held Saturday, September 12. With your support, FMHA fund raising is keeping hockey affordable for over 400 children in our community. Over the past two years, despite the rising costs of operations, the Initiation Program (IP) Tyke registration fees were reduced slightly, and our league fees have remained the same in all other age categories. Rep team jerseys have been replaced and (3) five week sessions of power skating were available to players at an affordable price. All of this could not be possible without tremendous community support. This year we are offering two types of sponsorship: the $200 Silver Sponsor will be presented on individual signage that will be displayed on the course tee blocks or greens, as well as on a large thank you signage board for display during the tournament and at Frontenac Arena during the 2015/2016 season. The $500 Gold Sponsor package includes the above sponsor signage PLUS a Big Box Web Ad placed on our website's homepage for the 2015/16 season! Your day will be complete - tournament registration begins at 12:30pm with a 1:30pm shotgun start, lots of fun, followed by a delicious pork loin dinner, prizes and silent auction all for $100 per person.  

Police seek public’s assistance in Enterprise fires

Detectives with the Napanee detachment of the OPP are seeking the public’s assistance following two separate suspicious fires in Enterprise. On July 12, at 12:30am OPP were notified of a fire at 1583 Lake Road in Enterprise. The building, located on the west side of Lake Road, is a commercial building that had been unoccupied for several years. The Stone Mills Fire Department attended the scene and extinguished the fire. Very little damage was done to the building. The office of the Fire Marshal was contacted. On July 22, at 1:20am the OPP responded to a second structure fire at the same abandoned building. The Stone Mills Fire Department attended the scene. However, the building was fully engulfed in flames and totally destroyed by fire. Anyone who has information relating to these suspicious fires is asked to contact Napanee OPP Detective Dave Peterson or contact Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477 or report anonymously online at tipsubmit.com.

Maggie Clark receives 150th anniversary scholarship

At the regular county council meeting in Sydenham on July 15, former South Frontenac mayor and county warden Gary Davison, and current mayor of Frontenac Islands and county warden Dennis Doyle, presented Maggie Clark with a special one-time 150th anniversary scholarship award on behalf of the county. The $1,000 bursary was open to all senior students residing in the County of Frontenac who are planning to pursue a post-secondary education. Clark was chosen by members of the 150th Anniversary Planning Committee, who were looking for students, who throughout their school careers, have shown an enthusiasm for celebrating and enhancing life in their community through sustainable means, be they environmental, economic, social or cultural. Students were asked to write a 1000-word essay about these pursuits. After accepting the award, Clark thanked council and spoke about her various pursuits, many of which are art-related. She has her own up-cycling art business in which she creates unique items from recycled materials. She currently displays and sells her work at the Frontenac Farmers Market in Verona. Clark plans to further her studies and will be pursuing a post-secondary commerce degree at university. Congratulations to Maggie Clark on her well-deserved award.

FRONTENAC COUNTY NEWS

Farming and activism takes local farmer across the world

Farming and activism takes local farmer across the world

Early Sunday morning Ayla Fenton meets the van from Roots Down Organic Farm at the busy Memorial Centre Farmers Market in Kingston, where she will set up and vend produce into the afternoon. She is an energetic presence; you rarely see her standing idly, waiting. Fenton is what ...

Frontenac County fails in bid to quash Gutowski lawsuit

Lawyers for Frontenac County have gone all the way to the Supreme Court of Canada to assert that statements made by council members at its meetings are subject to the same protections as statements made by MPs in Parliament. That challenge has yielded a resounding no, leaving the County on the hook for court costs, and finally clearing the way for former warden, Janet Gutowski, to continue her defamation suit against four members of the council that served from 2010 to 2014. The case revolves around a motion that was made by former county council member, David Jones, in May of 2013. The motion charged Gutowski with “uttering promises and rewards in an effort to conspire with staff to move County councilors to vote in a biased, corrupt, or any other improper manner”, and moved to “rescind all the privileges of her office immediately”. It requested that Central Frontenac, the township she represented on the council, appoint a replacement for her “as soon as possible”. Although the motion passed by a vote of 4-3, it had no effect because removing a member or a warden is beyond the authority of a municipal council in Ontario. Gutowski remained in her role as warden for another seven months and remained on Council until the end of its term on December 1, 2014. She did, however, send a lawyer's letter to Jones and the three other members of Council who supported the motion, John McDougall, Dennis Doyle and Bud Clayton, requesting they rescind the motion and apologize for the allegations it contained. When this did not happen, she launched a defamation suit in September of 2013 against the four men, seeking $1 million in damages. When the matter came to court, county lawyers made a motion to quash on the grounds that “absolute privilege” applies to utterances made as part of county council meetings. An Ontario Superior Court judge dismissed the motion, and an Ontario Court of Appeal judge, and now the Supreme Court of Canada, have dismissed appeals of that ruling. In rendering its ruling the Supreme Court reiterated the determination that was made by the trial judge: “The Court determined the question of law by holding that municipal councilors do not enjoy absolute privilege for comments made in the course of council meetings,” the ruling said. The court also awarded legal costs to Gutowski, as had the Ontario Court of Appeal earlier. The lawsuit can now proceed in Ontario Superior Court. It has now been almost two years since the suit was originally launched. In that time Bud Clayton has died, and Jones was re-elected to Frontenac Islands Council, but not to Frontenac County Council because he did not receive the highest vote count in the Howe Island ward. He resigned from Frontenac Islands Council immediately thereafter. Janet Gutowski was also defeated in her bid for a third term as mayor of Central Frontenac. Dennis Doyle and John McDougall were re-elected and are back on County Council. Doyle is currently the warden of Frontenac County. “I'm pleased with the ruling,” said Gutowski, “although this whole matter has taken much longer than I ever thought it would. I'm not sure where it will all go from here. I believe my lawyer and the county's lawyer are in contact and the next steps will be determined by them. There has been no apology and the motion has not been rescinded. I guess we are headed back to court.”

Frontenac County fails in bid to quash Gutowski lawsuit

Lawyers for Frontenac County have gone all the way to the Supreme Court of Canada to assert that statements made by council members at its meetings are subject to the same protections as statements made by MPs in Parliament. That challenge has yielded a resounding no, leaving the County on the hook for court costs, and finally clearing the way for former warden, Janet Gutowski, to continue her defamation suit against four members of the council that served from 2010 to 2014. The case revolves around a motion that was made by former county council member, David Jones, in May of 2013. The motion charged Gutowski with “uttering promises and rewards in an effort to conspire with staff to move County councilors to vote in a biased, corrupt, or any other improper manner”, and moved to “rescind all the privileges of her office immediately”. It requested that Central Frontenac, the township she represented on the council, appoint a replacement for her “as soon as possible”. Although the motion passed by a vote of 4-3, it had no effect because removing a member or a warden is beyond the authority of a municipal council in Ontario. Gutowski remained in her role as warden for another seven months and remained on Council until the end of its term on December 1, 2014. She did, however, send a lawyer's letter to Jones and the three other members of Council who supported the motion, John McDougall, Dennis Doyle and Bud Clayton, requesting they rescind the motion and apologize for the allegations it contained. When this did not happen, she launched a defamation suit in September of 2013 against the four men, seeking $1 million in damages. When the matter came to court, county lawyers made a motion to quash on the grounds that “absolute privilege” applies to utterances made as part of county council meetings. An Ontario Superior Court judge dismissed the motion, and an Ontario Court of Appeal judge, and now the Supreme Court of Canada, have dismissed appeals of that ruling. In rendering its ruling the Supreme Court reiterated the determination that was made by the trial judge: “The Court determined the question of law by holding that municipal councilors do not enjoy absolute privilege for comments made in the course of council meetings,” the ruling said. The court also awarded legal costs to Gutowski, as had the Ontario Court of Appeal earlier. The lawsuit can now proceed in Ontario Superior Court. It has now been almost two years since the suit was originally launched. In that time Bud Clayton has died, and Jones was re-elected to Frontenac Islands Council, but not to Frontenac County Council because he did not receive the highest vote count in the Howe Island ward. He resigned from Frontenac Islands Council immediately thereafter. Janet Gutowski was also defeated in her bid for a third term as mayor of Central Frontenac. Dennis Doyle and John McDougall were re-elected and are back on County Council. Doyle is currently the warden of Frontenac County. “I'm pleased with the ruling,” said Gutowski, “although this whole matter has taken much longer than I ever thought it would. I'm not sure where it will all go from here. I believe my lawyer and the county's lawyer are in contact and the next steps will be determined by them. There has been no apology and the motion has not been rescinded. I guess we are headed back to court.”

Independent Living Centre Kingston

Resources and support for people with disabilities Independent Living is a world-wide movement of people with disabilities working together to create resources and support for themselves. It is often considered a key part of the disability sector, as its focus is on the “whole person”, empowerment, and self-direction. Delivered through Independent Living Centres, “IL” programs are designed to connect with the personal experience and need of the consumer. They tend to be longer-term and more wide-ranging than most human services programs. They also connect with community services such as medical, employment, volunteering, educational, housing, justice or seniors services. Core programs at IL Centres are Independent Living Skills, Information and Networking, Peer Support and Community Development. IL Skills include disability management and is designed to assist individuals and families in personal change especially - gaining awareness, developing life and social skills, building plans, taking action and whatever else it takes to change one’s life for the better. Information and Networking often connects with IL Skills as it assists individuals and families in understanding how services work in the community, getting and using information, completing applications and working with practitioners whose assistance is required. Peer Support is not only a program connecting individuals at a drop-in or dinner club - it’s also how things work at an IL Centre, which is an organization of people with Independent Living Centre Kingston 2 Resources and Support for People with Disabilities. Mentoring of people new to disability, giving real support to those becoming disabled, and grappling with barriers is our daily work. Community Development, for Independent Living, means building IL into community services and assisting partner agencies or practitioners in understanding the value of consumer-direction (learning for oneself, taking ownership of a situation, connecting one’s person or one’s life to a process). IL Centres may deliver other programs designed to build accessibility, consumer-direction, better living supports, co-operation and self-exploration. Ontario’s “Self-Managed Attendant Services”, for instance, makes it possible for persons with mobility barriers to employ and manage their own attendants. The Canada-wide “Navigating the Waters” project supported individuals seeking employment with wage subsidies, training dollars and longer-term personal assistance when it came to barriers in daily living. Unique projects helping seniors and others with disabilities who are isolated are an essential component at many centres. Workshops providing information and awareness, personal connections and practical experience about many topics are in development at IL Kingston. IL Centres are often hubs connecting agencies and peer groups when it comes to fundamental living issues such as poverty, isolation, gaps in service, disability, abuse, addiction, underemployment and many other issues. IL Centres are places where accessibility and accommodation, safe and confidential self exploration, co-operation and creativity make a very big difference for thousands of individuals with disabilities and their families each year. Independent Living Canada, our national office, can be found on the Internet at www.ilcanada.ca. Our regional centre, in Kingston, can be found at www.ilckingston.com or 613-542-8353. This article is provided by Independent Living Centre Kingston. It is intended to support self-awareness and community change. It is not intended as professional advice and is not meant to replace services by medical, legal or other practitioners. For more information, call 613-542-8353 or visit www.ilckingston.com.

Wolfe Island Music Festival

The 17th annual non-profit Wolfe Island Music Festival will be running August 7-8. The line-up is a diverse mix of Folk Country, Alternative, Pop and Rock. The music will be presented on four separate stages Friday night and the main stage in full swing on Saturday. The festival will be held on Wolfe Island, a free 20-minute ferry ride away from Kingston. There will also be a free ride on the party boat taking festival goers from Kingston to Wolfe Island every day, offering local DJ's and live music during the ride. The festival line-up this year is nearly all Canadian bands with the Friday night line-up Elliot Brood, Limblifter, Mo Kenney, Daniel Romano, Spencer Burton, Wax Mannequin, Megan Hamilton, Brendan Philip, Elsa, The Kodeines and the Attic Kids. Saturday promises to be an enjoyable night as well with Constantines, Operators, Hayden, the Elwins, Moonface, Lowell, Tops, Taylor Knox, Highs and Lost Cousins. The Constantines have been having continued success since the release of their first album in 2001. Their sound is reminiscent of The Clash and Bruce Springsteen but with their own signature zing of roar and insightful commentaries on life added on top. If the name and description doesn't ring a bell, their performance at the 2010 Vancouver Olympics might! On that same night, seasoned performer Hayden will perform his eclectic mix of grunge and alternative country. Music will begin at 6pm on Friday and 12:30pm on Saturday. Cost for a camping package is $125, and cost for just a weekend concert access ticket is $100. Day passes are $50 for Friday night; $65 for Saturday. Children 12 and under get in free to Saturday's main stage. Food and drinks are available from various vendors throughout the festival. Music enthusiasts will enjoy the calm and not overly populated venue to hear great music with a killer view of Lake Ontario. It is a family friendly atmosphere with more to offer than just the music - as if that wasn't enough! For more information visit www.wolfeislandmusicfestival.com.

ADDINGTON HIGHLANDS NEWS

New artist debuts at Bon Echo Art Show

New artist debuts at Bon Echo Art Show

One of the great things about the annual Bon Echo Art Exhibition & Sale is that there is always something for everyone. The show, which is now in its 20th year and took place at Bon Echo Provincial Park from July 24 to 26 last weekend, offered something for all the senses: gr...

Addington Highlands Council votes yes to supporting wind turbines

On Monday night, July 20 in Flinton, Addington Highlands Council voted yes to signing a support agreement with Nextera and Renewable Energy Systems Canada (RES). Council's support will improve both companies' chances of securing contracts for wind turbine developments in the area from the Independent Electricity System Operator (IESO). Reeve Henry Hogg, Councilor Helen Yanch, and Councilor Bill Cox all voted in support of the resolution. Councilors Tony Fritsch and Kirby Thompson voted against it on the basis that there hasn't been enough time to research the projects properly. The meeting began in front of a packed crowd, with Councilor Yanch making a statement regarding recent accusations that she is in a conflict of interest because of the gravel pit she owns with her husband. “I would like to set the record straight,” Yanch said. “We do not own a gravel supply company. We own a pit.” She went on to state, “No materials from our pit will be used to construct wind turbines or access roads to the turbines in the Township of Addington Highlands.” Following this, Tony Fleming, a lawyer with Cunningham Swan Lawyers out of Kingston, made a short presentation to council offering them some suggestions and guidance regarding Nextera and RES' community vibrancy fund offers. Fleming, who has negotiated wind vibrancy agreements for other municipalities in the province, explained how Nextera's payment offers could play out for the township. Currently, Addington Highlands doesn't know how many turbines will be installed or where the transmission lines will run. Fleming therefore used a hypothetical scenario wherein Addington Highlands had one transfer station built and 10km worth of transmission lines installed to illustrate to Council how much they could profit from the project. These projections were based on the proposed $3500/MW that Nextera and RES are offering the township. “There are two scenarios for council's consideration...Council is looking at possibly $15.7 million over 20 years,” Fleming said. “Under the second scenario...you're looking about $2.6 million less over twenty years...but you're getting $2.15 million in year one.” Fritsch raised concerns about some of the vague wording in the vibrancy agreements and pointed out that the Nextera agreement states the project is “expected to be rated at up to 200 megawatts... It depends on the approvals that they get from the province,” Fleming explained. “I think we can assume that if they're given 200MW they will do everything in their power to site and install 200MW of generating capacity.” “If they don't know how many are going to go in and we're not going to know how many are going to go in until it's approved then how does that affect our vibrancy agreement...?” Councilor Cox asked. Fleming explained that Nextera's vibrancy agreement awards the township a minimum of $500,000 regardless of the number of turbines installed. Cox also asked, “What's the deadline for them telling the constituents and the council how many [turbines]...where they're going...when are we going to know that? “I don't think that they can give that kind of information until after the procurement process and a supply contract has been awarded,” Fleming said. Fleming explained that RES's vibrancy agreement is similar to the one Nextera put forth but that they are also offering a “balloon” payment of $595,000 to be paid after the contract is awarded but before construction begins, provided that RES wins the bid. Fleming also spoke about light mitigation and Fritsch's concerns around the wording regarding it in the vibrancy agreement. The agreement states that Nextera will “use commercially reasonable efforts...” to mitigate wind turbine aviation safety lighting. “At the end of the day if the federal government won't allow something that tall in this area without navigation lights on it (then) there really isn't anything that anyone can do about that,” Fleming said. “I don't think you can say 'we must have it' because they [Nextera] can't say 'we'll absolutely provide it'..” Fritsch wanted to know the “very last date” that they could submit their decision to Nextera and RES so that council could have more time to make an informed decision. “I would suspect that they are anxious, obviously, to see if council will support,” Fleming said. “I believe they need some significant lead time to put their applications together...what the actual 'drop-dead' date is I really don't know.” “If they need it for the first of August then we're looking at a week and a half to two weeks,” Fleming speculated. “The province will do whatever the province is going to do,” Fleming said, regarding the small window for decision-making. “All you can try and do is what's in the public interest knowing that these things could be approved with or without you.” “Is that a legal statement?” someone called out from the audience. Tony Fritsch made a motion to postpone the vote on signing the support agreement until after agenda item #8 was read. Item #8 was a new resolution put forward by Fritsch asking Council not to sign the support agreement. Instead, the resolution would propose additional research and preparation for an anticipated wind project procurement in 2016. This would allow council a period of 10 months to evaluate the project and make an informed decision. Reeve Hogg, Councillor Yanch, and Councillor Cox all voted against Fritsch's motion to review his new resolution prior to voting on the support agreement, defeating it 3-2. Reeve Hogg then read aloud the resolution to support the turbine projects. After Cox quickly gave his “yea” to the resolution, Thompson spoke up. “If we do this right now we don't have control. We don't get to say 'we want them a kilometre away, we want them this way...' Thompson said. “We've said repeatedly we don't have time to get this set up. We don't have time to negotiate these contracts. These companies will be here next year. There is another 300MW project being given for 2016 and 2017. They will come back again. They're not spending all this money up here and walking away.” “If we have another 10 months to work on this and find out what we need to know...” Thompson said. “I just don't think we are prepared to do this right now. I think we are jumping the gun.” At this point the crowd, made up predominantly of residents opposed to the current proposals, erupted into a long and loud applause. “We need to take the time to do our homework,” Fritsch said. “We need to represent the people properly and do everyone justice.” Again, a loud applause. “It's not necessarily the developer's fault,” Fritsch said. “It's a terrible process. It puts everyone in an awkward position. It puts those developers in an awkward position. It puts our neighbours in an awkward position...and it puts the council in a terrible position.” “The only thing we have control of is time,” Fritsch said. “It's up to the council. They can make the decision to take the time... I beg the council to make that right decision.” Hogg quickly asked for a recorded vote once the applause died down and Bill Cox, Helen Yanch, and Reeve Henry Hogg all voted in favour of signing the support agreement, beating out Kirby Thompson and Tony Fritsch's “nay” votes 3-2. When asked why council put the vote through so quickly, Reeve Hogg replied, “We do have correspondence saying that they're not going to wait. If they don't get a decision from us they're going to proceed without us.” Hogg explained, but was unable to specify whether a clear deadline had been provided. “We have to decide some time.”

Inaugural Sail Mazinaw

The boats in the inaugural Sail Mazinaw had to endure gray skies and light shifty breezes in the morning. But by afternoon, the skies had cleared and a consistent west wind had set in. It was a warm, sunny day with the perfect sailing breeze. A west wind does not have enough fetch on the narrow lake to build a significant swell or chop. The beaches at Bon Echo were loaded with swimmers and sunbathers. Alpine Club of Canada had several teams of climbers on Bon Echo rock. The day started with a crew breakfast at Mazinaw Lakeside Resort. The staff opened the doors early for the sailors so that they could maximize their time on the water. Then, the boats hit the lake for a day of sailing. At noon, the crews from the north lake and the crews from the south lake met at The Friends of Bon Echo barbecue pavilion in Bon Echo Provincial Park. The historic Mazinaw Cup was donated to the event by Linda Leistner. It will be presented to Steve Karniej and Andy Lennon for their activities both on and off the water. These sailors from Hamilton drove crews to and from the breakfast, delivered veteran windsurfing champion Glen Pearce from Shabomeka Lake to Bon Echo Park, and still found time to change a flat tire for a stranded motorist on Highway 41. Congratulations to Steve and Andy. The date for the 2016 Sail Mazinaw has not been determined. For more photos, visit the Sail Mazinaw Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/SailMazinaw

It's coming 'round the bend – Flinton Community Jamboree

The Flinton Community Jamboree, originally The Flinton Country Bluegrass Jamboree, is all set for another successful weekend with three days of non-stop entertainment from Friday, July 31 to Sunday, August 2 at the Township Rec Centre. This year will mark the 11th consecutive festival, which was originally started by Donna, Duane and Willard Thibault in order to raise the money to build a roof over the skating rink at the Flinton Township Hall. The Jamboree has fully established itself since then, growing more and more popular each year, with last year having over 225 trailers in attendance. The festival has changed hands from the Thibaults to new chairman, Andy Anderson. This change has allowed the Thibaults to sit back and enjoy the jamboree after years of working overtime for their community. Anderson, along with many of the same volunteers from previous years, will be taking on the organizing in order to keep the tradition alive. Carolyn Hasler has offered to continue with the canteen and food organization. Profits will be returned to the community, dispersed among several organizations. Charlie Patton will be emceeing this year, and MT System/Limestone Music will be engineering the audio for the duration of the weekend. The Land O’ Lakes Cruisers will be the “house band” this year. The original trio of Cathy Whalen, Doug Mumford and Ralph DeFoe had a good idea when they wanted to start a dance band. The band expanded and evolved into the Land O’ Lakes Cruisers. Today, Cathy Whalen remains the only original member of the band and performs with four gentlemen, forming a group that’s primarily a dance band featuring classic country music. The Land O’ Lakes Cruisers will be playing at the Flinton Community Jamboree Friday night at 8:45 pm and again on Saturday at 4 pm. Also featured this year will be the popular Eddy and the Stingrays and their 50s and 60s music. They'll take you on a nostalgic trip with doo-wop, tear-jerkers and rock and roll standards on Saturday, August 1 at 8:30pm. Cost is $35 for a weekend pass (with rough camping $55); 13-16yrs half price; 12 years and under free. Friday and Sunday the cost is $10, and Saturday cost is $25. Please note that after 6pm, admission for the Saturday evening shows, which feature three great groups - Sweet Grass, the White Family and Eddy & The Stingrays, lowers to $15. The Flinton Community Jamboree will be jam-packed with other country and bluegrass acts as well, including the Pickled Chicken band, Lionel Grimard and Eleven Roses, and many more. The full schedule will be published in next week’s edition of the Frontenac News (Thursday, July 23). The weekend will be enjoyable for all ages; dancing and music appreciators will especially welcome this year’s festival. For tickets and reservations call Karen, 613-743-4829; vendors please call Cathy 613-243-3112. For more information visit flintonjamboree.ca  

COFA looks for new leadership and direction

On July 11, members of COFA (Conservationists of Frontenac Addington) attended a meeting at the Barrie hall in Cloyne, where Ron Pethick, one of the organization's founding members, announced that he would be stepping down this year after over two decades as the organization's president. He cited health issues and said he lacks the necessary energy required for the role. He also understands that the organization needs some fresh blood to foster new directions if it is to continue. Pethick said he does hope to see the organization continue and he is hoping that the members will hold elections this September. Pethick opened the meeting with a history of COFA, which was formed in 1994, because, he said, “A lot was going on politically at that time and we needed to have a local voice in this area to make sure that certain things like resources, land management and wild life habitats and populations were properly looked after.” In fact, it was a meeting held at that time at the Lions hall in Northbrook, which hundreds of people attended, that Pethick said resulted in the squashing of the Madawaska Highlands Regional Trust, a group whose aim he said was to “ban fishing, boating hunting, trapping, and logging in an area that stretched west to Bancroft, north to Madoc, east to Perth and south to Cobden.” COFA was formed after the Northbrook meeting and has been up and running ever since. In 1995 the organization established the Bishop Lake pickerel hatchery, where over 11 years, 18.5 million swim up pickerel fry were hatched and deposited in area lakes. The organization also stocked 28,000 speckled trout in local lakes, along with thousands of rainbow trout and pickerel fingerlings. In an effort to improve local pickerel spawning beds, members have helped spread 350 tons of rock in Mississagagon Lake and similarly spread another 70 tonnes of rock at Skootamatta causeway. As well, in conjunction with the Mississippi Valley Conservation Authority, an additional 150 tons was spread in Mazinaw Lake to create a new lake trout spawning bed. Members have run hundreds of miles of trails to assist deer during especially harsh winters and have also provided herds with thousands of pounds of feed. Members have also helped to fund the rehabilitation of orphaned white tailed deer and for years have donated a $500 bursary annually to local North Addington Education Centre students. This August six lucky youngster, thanks to COFA, will be fishing at Deer Rock Lake. Now with the hatchery no longer functioning and with Pethick making public his intention of stepping down, many members are wondering how and if COFA will carry on. They stress the need to get new projects up and running in order to attract new members. Many suggestions were made at the Cloyne meeting. One member volunteered to assist Ron's wife Dot with administrative tasks and other new ideas were suggested, which included establishing a COFA website, getting students at NAEC involved with the group and also trying to make connections with the various local lake associations to find out what kinds of projects COFA members may be able to assist with. It is still a big unknown whether the hatchery, in which COFA has upwards of $15,000 invested, will ever be operational again, though many members expressed interest in getting it up and running. It looks as though there are members who want to COFA to continue into the future. Long-time member Dave Dacuk shot up his hand when asked if anyone would be interested in stepping in as president and it was decided that a second meeting will be held in September, at which time elections will likely be held. In the meantime, members were asked to continue brain storming about possible new projects for the future. Anyone interested in joining COFA or existing members who missed the meeting but have new ideas for COFA's future, please contact Lauder Smith at 613-336-2998.


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