Featured News

Central Frontenac celebrates area trails with 2nd annual Trail Day

Central Frontenac celebrates area trails with 2nd annual Trail Day

Written By: Craig Bakay | Published: September-19-2018 | Category: CENTRAL FRONTENAC
Tagged Under: Sharbot Lake, trails, Community Event

Central Frontenac celebrated its 2nd annual Trail Day Saturday with most events happening at the Caboose in Sharbot Lake’s Railway Park. There were trail rides, historic walks, bands, little the...

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Sparse crowd but vigorous debate in Mountain Grove

Sparse crowd but vigorous debate in Mountain Grove

It’s not unusual for candidates debate crowds to be small when the Mayor’s position is already filled by acclamation. When you take out the number of sitting Central Frontenac Council memb...

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Storrington meet the candidates event draws a good crowd

Storrington meet the candidates event draws a good crowd

It was a considerable attendance last Thursday night at the Storrington Centre as the Battersea Loughborough Lake Association hosted a meet the candidates event for residents to ask questions of the t...

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North Frontenac Back Roads Studio Tour

North Frontenac Back Roads Studio Tour

The end of September, one of the loveliest times in the Northern Part of Frontenac County, brings with it the North Frontenac Back Roads Studio Tour. As with many such successful tours, the participat...

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Grace Hall Scene of Big Sewing Bee

Grace Hall Scene of Big Sewing Bee

On Saturday, September 8, the members of Sydenham Women’s Institute turned Grace Hall into a well-organized workroom for members from five area counties to participate in an all-day sewing bee. ...

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Jim Kelly – community linchpin, dead at 77

Jim Kelly had a distinguished career at Queen’s University, but what he is being remembered fo...

Frontenac County Council politicians vote themselves a 27% wage increase

Rejecting a consultants report which called for their wages to more than double in order to keep up ...

Is Sydenham on the wane as the centre of the South Frontenac universe?

There was a 100% increase in the number of stoplights in Frontenac County when the new light was swi...

Inverary Youth facing $24,530 in unexpected expenses

Inverary Youth Activities came to South Frontenac Committee of the Whole Tuesday night in Sydenham a...

South Frontenac Council – September 18

Interim Grant for Inverary Park Council voted to increase their annual $600 grant to Inverary Youth...

The Limestone School Board trustee election just got a lot more interesting

(The following has been edited since being published in the print version of the Frontenac News on S...

Harrowsmith road project completion marked at ceremony

The Harrowsmith corner project has brought a horse-and-buggy intersection into the 21st century, tur...

Fury Family Fun Day features equipment swap, sock sizing, barbecue

Frontenac Fury hockey organization president Lynn Newton welcomed the public to the Frontenac Commun...

Fat Chance Farmstead putting their own twist on organic fruits and vegetables

Josh Suppan and Jen Valberg are the new kids on the block with their Fat Chance Farmstead on Road 38...

Long Road Eco Farm mixes oriental cuisine with Ontario-grown ingredients

Jonathan Davies and Xiaobing Shen have found their own unique niche in Frontenac farming with their ...

NORTH FRONTENAC NEWS

North Frontenac Back Roads Studio Tour

North Frontenac Back Roads Studio Tour

The end of September, one of the loveliest times in the Northern Part of Frontenac County, brings with it the North Frontenac Back Roads Studio Tour. As with many such successful tours, the participating artists are a loyal crowd and most of them can be visited again this year. S...

Pine Meadow Nursing Home celebrates 25 years in operation

Emcee Bill Cox welcomed residents, staff, board members, family and friends as they gathered on the lawns of Pine Meadows Nursing Home in Northbrook last Friday afternoon to celebrate its 25th anniversary. Pine Meadow is a 64-bed facility. “I don’t know how this happened, I haven’t been on staff here for 17 years,” joked Cheryl Hartwick, now board chair of Land O’Lakes Community Services. Hartwick noted that four employees, public service workers Nancy Gaylord and Tony Boomhouer-Wilson, office co-ordinator Christine Bolduc and RN Anne Grahm-Aholu, have been there for the duration. “There have been four administrators and over the years, there have been $1,339,749.10 in donations,” she said. And, she took the time to share one of her “pet peeves.” “When people say ‘Pine Meadows,’ I get upset,” she said. “It’s ‘Pine Meadow,’ — singular!” Addington Highlands Reeve Henry Hogg brought greetings and congratulations from the Township. He also noted what the facility has meant to the community. “Not only is it an essential service, it’s an important source of jobs and economic opportunity,” Hogg said. Bringing greetings from North Frontenac Township, Coun. John Inglis said: “I’ve always been aware there is a significant number of residents from North Frontenac here. “It’s a mystery as to why there is no financial contribution from Frontenac County.” Sharon Gilmour, regional director for Extendicare, said: “I have 14 homes I’m responsible for and this one is my favourite. “The home continues to enjoy the highest standards of financial responsibility and residents’ satisfaction.” Land O’ Lakes Lions Club Red Emond said: “Twenty-five years ago, members of our club mortgaged their homes so this place could be built. “We’ve donated $130,000 over the years and we’ll continue to support it.” Representing the Family Council, chair Shirley Sedore’s voice began to shake as she offered her congratulations. “I’ve been involved since before it was a dream,” she said. Merritta Parks, president of the residents’ council who just turned 100, said she always she didn’t want to go into a nursing home until she came here. “Our staff is wonderful,” she said. “They go from person to person, put their arm around your shoulder and whisper in your ear. “I thank God we have a place like this.” Ernest Lapchinski concluded the speeches by saying: “Persistence, cooperation and the need for a facility like this moved from what seemed to be impossible to become reality. “Be proud, be very proud.”

Fish habitat added to both Mazinaw Lakes

It’s inevitable. As lakefront properties get developed, some of the woody debris that naturally occurs in the lake disappears. “We’re putting some of that back,” said Melissa Dakers, lake stewardship co-ordinator with Watersheds Canada. Last week, Dakers, along with Vern Haggerty and other members of the Mazinaw Property Owners Association, were busily involved in placing 24 structures in the Upper and Lower Mazinaw Lakes. “We call them brush bundles of fish habitat,” Dakers said. “Each bundle is six to eight feet long and two to three feet wide, and made from a variety of woods including pine, cedar, maple — it doesn’t matter. “They’re tied together with rope and anchored with cinder blocks.” The bundles provide shelter and habitat for a variety of species including bass, walleye and a number of minnow species. Most of the bundles are placed in about 12 feet of water, so as not to be a navigation hazard, but some placed in back bays are much shallower, primarily to accommodate minnows. “They’re as big as two men can carry,” said Haggerty. Dakers said she was pleased the MPOA contacted her to add the Mazinaws to the project which also includes Canonto, Mississippi, Christie and Dalhousie Lakes. “When we put them in Otty Lake, one of the guys had a GoPro camera in the water and within 30 seconds, fish were coming in to check it out.” She said the project began in 2014, with funding coming from Fisheries and Oceans Canada under the Recreational Fisheries program. Dakers said this project in particular could show results. “The MNR did a net study of these lakes this year and plans to do another in about three years,” she said. “We should get some indication of how well it has worked then.” Dakers said that she’s still looking for more lakes to work with and encouraged lake associations to contact Watersheds Canada. “I’ve enjoyed this immensely,” said Haggerty. “I took water resources in college but I’ve only worked in project management. “It’s great that we have organizations like Watershed Canada to work with.” “This is a fantastic job,” Dakers said. “In the winter, I write reports and grants and in the summer, I get to do this.”     From left, Melissa Dakers of Watersheds Canada, Vern Haggerty, Mazinaw Lake lead steward and Mazinaw Property Owners president Francine Bates spent two days adding protective fish structure in both the Upper and Lower Mazinaw Lakes. Photo/Craig Bakay

North Frontenac Zoning Bylaw nearing completion following marathon meeting

North Frontenac Council and the Township Committee of Adjustment went through its proposed new Zoning Bylaw page by page last Friday at a special meeting that lasted well into the afternoon. “I think it’s good to get these things cleared up,” said Coun. Gerry Martin after the meeting. “We’re dealing with a lot of history here and many of the items go back a long time.” Essentially, Council was pleased with the document enough to schedule an open house for the public to review changes and provide a final round of feedback on Oct. 27 at 10 a.m. Then, there will be a public meeting Nov. 23 at 1 p.m. (following the regular Council meeting) to finalize passage of the document. Council did pass a resolution to instruct planner Tracy Zander to make a few amendments. Here’s a list of said changes: • Add definition for aquaponics • Change medical marijuana to cannabis • Change tiny house to tiny home • Add a definition of Official Plan • Remove family farm from definition of rural co-op • Add doctor to definition of wellness centre • Remove deck from Section 3.12 • Change 1 square metre sign to 2 square metre sign throughout bylaw • Define nutrient unit • Remove Section 3.20 hunting/fishing camp • Change bylaw to guideline in Section 3.21 • Remove outdoor furnace section • Remove Section 3.28 c) and change to commercial Section b) • Add following uses to Hamlet Zone — cemetery and marina • Add following uses to Rural Cooperative — industrial class I, multi-residential uses, Personal Service, printing/publishing, retirement home, commercial greenhouse and add site plan as a requirement. Also Zander agreed to work on the section regulating the temporary use of recreational vehicles allowing trailers on any residential land for up to 14 days. Some sections of the bylaw that were removed, such as wood-burning furnaces and solar regulations will likely resurface as separate bylaws at the recommendation of the planners.

MALLA sounds the alarm again about Eurasian Millfoil

North Frontenac Council certainly paid attention what members of the Malcolm and Ardoch Lake Association (MALLA) had to say last Friday morning.(August 24). In a 20 minute presentation, MALLA President Glen Fowler was joined by Vice President Brenda Martin, Cathy Owne and two subject experts who have property on the lake, marine biologists Bud Griswold and Mary Gessner. They outlined not only the alarming increase in the spread of the millfoil on the shallow lake this year, but also the research they have done about how to try and manage an infestation of the seemingly innocuous plant. When it gets established, the millfoil forms a thick intertwined mat at the surface, capable of stopping the motor in a boat that passes through it. It was originally brought to North America by the aquarium industry, and when someone dumped an aquarium into a lake in the Us Midwest, the Millfoil began its march through cottage country, aided by boats that are transported from lake to lake by boaters looking for new adventures and fishing opportunities. The plant takes root at the bottom of the lake, and therefore it is not a problem in deeper water, but in shallow areas of deep lakes and in major portions of shallow lakes such as Malcolm and Ardoch, it can become established and at that point it is difficult, if not impossible, to manage using current techniques. It typically grows in 2-4 metres of water, but can grow in depths up to 10 metres. Like so many garden weeds, breaking off bits of the plant only aid in its propagation, the only way to kill it is to pull it out by the roots, which is difficult in 5 metre deep water. And, according to Brenda Martin, once established in a hospitable lake, it can flourish. ‘A patch that was 10 ‘ by 10’ which we were planning to do a pilot project on, has now grown to be 60’ by 900’, too large for that original plan,” she said to Council. Mary Gessner contacted the Lake Association from Big Cedar Lake in the Kawartha Lakes to see how their management efforts had progressed. She reported that Big Cedar Lake had invested in weevil stocking. Together with Trent University they have stocked 320,000 millfoil weevils, which only feed on millfoil plants, both native millfois whihc do not present a threat, and the eurasian millfoil as well. After a 5 year project, the Big Cedar study concluded that while there were some indications of a die back of millfoil, it inevitably recovered the following year. The weevil, at least on its own, is not a solution. As well, they were expensive and in fact are not longer available on the commercial market. Other control methods have their own problems. Mechanical removal is labour intensive and may backfire if it leads to fragments that can float off and establish new colonies by rooting somewhere else, chemical controls tend to effect everything in the lake, which is counter to the goal of protecting habitat from the millfoil. It is not exactly a solution, but the most promising control that both the Big Cedar and MALLA Associations are looking at now, is burlap. The idea is to blanket the bottom of the lake and physically block the progress of the plant from the root on up. MALLA is keen to try this control, using fish habitat bundles to hold down the burlap, which will biodegrade over time. Although burlap would block out everything, the idea is that the other species would recover once the millfoil is, if not eradicated, at least curtailed. MALLA has instituted a 12 point action plan. It starts with seeking support from the municipality and educating property owners throughout the township, particularly those living on lakes that are affected. It extends to seeking co-operation from the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry for a pilot project with a burlap blanket, and seeking partnerships with other bodies, and applying for funding from a number of sources to carry out their initiatives. MALLA will also be approaching Granite Ridge Education Centre’s “Above and Beyond” drone program in order to track vegetation on the lake. Glenn Fowler brought information about the millfoil to a meeting of the North Frontenac Lake Association Alliance in early August. “From that meeting, I can inform Council that at least 7 lakes in the township, other than Malcolm and Ardoch, are reporting they have eurasian millfoil in their lake,” he said. “They are: Big Gull, Canonto, Mosque, Palmerston, Kashwakamak, Brule, and the Mississippi River.” One of the requests MALLA brought to Council was for them to apply whatever pressure they could on the MNR-F to handle their application for a permit try using burlap on Ardoch Lake. “We had plans for a pilot project with the burlap this summer, but have been waiting for MNR-F to approve the application we made to them for a pilot project. We hand delivered our application in July and we have phoned often since then to ask them when they are going to deal with our application but nothing has happened,” said Brenda Martin. The first request of MALLA to the township was to apply political pressure on the MNR-F to approve their application. They also asked for $10,000 for MALLA to partner with Watersheds - Canada (a Perth based ecological organisation) to hire a graduate student to manage their efforts next year. They also asked for $1,500 this year to purchase materials for the pilot project, should it be approved. They also asked the township to consider boat wash station in each of the wards and to use the township website as a tool to educate lake users about the need to wash boats before launching them on new lakes. Finally they want the township to apply for federal and provincial funding to “address the issue before it becomes a crisis.” Mayor Ron Higgins, fresh from a meeting with provincial officials at the Association of Municipalities of Ontario, said he thought he would be able to push the MNR-F towards making a decision on the application for approval. Councillor John Inglis said “The $10,000 can go to our 2019 budget process, but I think we have no choice but to provide you with the $1,500 now.” Councillor Wayne Good asked about the impact of thre burlap on other species. “It will certainly affect lake activity of invertebrate species,” said Bud Griswold, but we will only apply it in limited locations.” The township procedural bylaw precluded approving the $1,500 on the spot. Council considered suspended the bylaw in this case, but Brenda Martin said there was no harm waiting three weeks. “We can’t do anything without the MNR approval anyway,” she said, “and we would need to order the supplies even if it gets approved and that will take time. Besides, I have a big VISA.” On Monday afternoon, one business day after Friday’s Council meeting, MALLA was informed that the application for a pilot project has been approved by the MNR.

CENTRAL FRONTENAC NEWS

Central Frontenac celebrates area trails with 2nd annual Trail Day

Central Frontenac celebrates area trails with 2nd annual Trail Day

Central Frontenac celebrated its 2nd annual Trail Day Saturday with most events happening at the Caboose in Sharbot Lake’s Railway Park. There were trail rides, historic walks, bands, little theatre, pickle ball, washer toss, story tent and end-of-the-trail stew at the Legi...

Sparse crowd but vigorous debate in Mountain Grove

It’s not unusual for candidates debate crowds to be small when the Mayor’s position is already filled by acclamation. When you take out the number of sitting Central Frontenac Council members and candidates from other districts in attendance, it was a rather intimate gathering indeed. However, it did make for some rousing ‘discussion,’ especially when moderator Jeff Green allowed the audience more leeway that is usual for such things. And mixed in there, the four candidates for the two seats in District 2 (Olden), managed to get their points across. Dan Cunningham wanted to see project management applied to every issue, not surprising given his background as a project manager for Stanley Tools. He said the septic reinspection program is a good example of something not being planned out. “We can save a lot of money,” he said. “One way is to stop the reinspection program. “It will cost money that would be better spent on our landfills. “And we need more work on roads.” Victor Heese said he thought stable leadership at the top has gone a long way in the Township. “We’ve gone through several CAOs and Cathy MacMunn being there has allowed us to focus on other things than hiring a CAO,” he said. “I know that hiring a full-time fire chief was controversial but we do now have better equipment for our firefighters, better halls and less liability.” Heese said he wanted to focus on better internet services to attract home-based businesses. Bill Everett said more people likely know his truck (B Sanitation) than himself but promised to “do my best to see improvements in Olden and Central Frontenac in general. “I’m not going to criticize anyone’s ideas — that’s for debate in Council.” Elwin Burke, who was Reeve of the old Olden Township for six years (three as councilor before that) said he’d like to see meetings moved from the 4 p.m. timeslot to the evening so more people could attend. (Mayor Frances Smith pointed out from the crowd that one of the the reasons they were changed to 4 p.m. was to cut down on overtime costs). Burke said he’d also like to see more recorded votes and gravel on the roads. Environmental issues took up much of the evening with a re-use centre at landfills being generally agreed to be something worth pursuing. However, septic reinspection didn’t sit well with three of the four candidates. “I have no issue with septic inspection but I have a big issue with more Big Brother,” said Everett. “Why are we inspecting? Do we have significant numbers of systems that are exploding?” “Around the lakes it can be very important but up here in the hills, where you can be miles from your nearest neighbour, I don’t see it as a problem,” said Burke. “It hasn’t been costed out and it doesn’t even meet the standards for being a project,” said Cunningham. “And, it’s separating people.” On the potential issue of there being a marijuana dispensary in Central Frontenac once it’s legalized Oct. 17, the candidates views were mixed, other than agreeing it shouldn’t be located near a school. “I’m not sure how much Council will have a say in it,” said Heese. “I would go with the provincial legislation,” said Cunningham. “I would have to vote yes,” said Everett. “A lot of people use it for medicinal reasons.” “I’m not a big fan of marijuana so if I lost an election because of it, I wouldn’t care,” said Burke. The purchase of two closed schools also drew a lot of attention. “Selling them off is part of my platform,” said Cunningham. “If I were to buy two schools, I’d want to have a plan of what to do with them, I haven’t seen a plan,” said Burke. “The plan for the Sharbot Lake school is some sort of seniors residences, but the current building will have to be demolished,” said Heese. “The Parham school could be some sort of recreation and community centre. “If we’d waited, they would have been much more expensive.” “I don’t know,” said Everett. “I think I would have been against it but we’re stuck now so we’ll have to make the best of it.”

Fire Department head, ambulance chief, seeking ways to curtail fire department calls to less urgent medical calls

Through an oversite, the tiered response agreement that determines which resources are deployed for emergency medical calls has run out, and in a report to Head of Emergency Services/fire Chief Greg Robinson recommended that Central Frontenac renew the agreement with no changes to keep things rolling along. At a meeting of Central Frontenac Council this week (Tuesday, September 11) Robinson presented a report that also called for the township to consider making changes to one of the protocols in the agreement. Central Frontenac volunteers answered 193 medical calls in 2016, “and that number has gone up since then” Robinson said. According to data collected by members of the Frontenac Paramedic Services, 67% of the time Central Frontenac fire fighters do not provide any medical services during the call. Currently, any time the dispatch service determines that an ambulance is more than 15 minutes away from a call, the fire service is called out. “Most of the time in Central Frontenac, the ambulance is more than 15 minutes away,” said Mayor Frances Smith. Robinson is recommending, in consultation with Chief Charbonneau, that for lower priority calls, those that are priority 4 (non-life threatening) firefighters only be called in if the ambulance is more than 25 minutes away. “Hopefully this will have an effect,” Robinson said. According to statistics provided by Robinson, among Frontenac County fire services, Central Frontenac is more encumbered by medical calls than either North or South Frontenac. “62% of our total emergency responses are medical; compared to 17% for Kingston Fire & Rescue, 30% for South Frontenac Fire & Rescue and 40% for North Frontenac. It is clear that the percentage of medical calls we have is out of proportion to the other Fire Departments in the County,” he said. He indicated that he believes Central Frontenac is being taken advantage of, so that the ambulance that is assigned to the Parham based can be re-deployed to the south in order to supplement the busy Kingston service. “The Parham ambulance is not often available because it gets called into Kingston a lot. It appears that it’s not an operational requirement to keep an ambulance at Parham. This may be due to the fact that Kingston Central Ambulance Communications Centre knows CFFR will respond to any medical call. We often get dispatched to calls that do not meet the response criteria. These calls are for very minor medical conditions but the Kingston Central Ambulance Communications Centre dispatches CFFR anyway when an ambulance will be delayed,” he said in his report. Members of Council want to hear more detail before making the changes that Robinson is suggesting. “This sounds like significant change,” said Councillor Philip Smith, “it certainly requires more discussion.” “Just because the ambulance service says no medical service was provided does not mean the people who made the call did not gain comfort from the arrival of someone within a reasonable amount of time, even if the ambulance does not arrive for 45 minutes to an hour,” said Councillor Brent Cameron. “Medical services were not what we were thinking about when the volunteer fire departments were being set up in the 1970’s,” said Councillor John Purdon “We are being dispatched to calls where we should not be dispatched,” concluded Greg Robinson. “There are provincial protocols for dispatch but there is leeway, and in my view calls come to Central Frontenac that would not go to other fire services. And this affects our fire budget” Robinson When asked afterwards why he thinks Central Frontenac is being singled out for calls, Robinson deferred, but he did confirm that he feels that calls to other locations are treated differently by the dipathc centre in Kingston than calls to Central Frontenac Construction reportConstructions starts were slow in August in Central Frontenac, putting a bit of a damper in what is still shaping up to be a the best year in the last three, and one of the best in Central Frontenac’s 20 year history. Permits for only $120,000 in construction were sold in August, down from almost $850,000 in each of previous two years. But overall in 2018, the township is just shy of $7.5 million, up a million from this time in 2017 and two million over the January to August total in 2016. Permits for 22 new permanent and seasonal residents have been sold this year, up from 21 at this point in 2017, and 14 in 2016. The building department budget is also healthier than in recent, with permit sales over $105,000 already, up from $91,000 in 2017 and $83,500 in 2016. Interim Chief Building Official Allan Revill said that he expects the numbers to keep rolling along over the next month or two as the department continues to be fielding inquiries about possible projects as the summer fades into autumn. Bordenwood RoadReg Peterson appeared as a delegate to Council to talk about what he considers inadequate maintenance on the road he lives on, Bordenwood in Kennebec ward. Mayor Smith encouraged him to call the Public works line during business hours when the road is in bad repair, or his local councillors. Fees waived for youth programMartha Johnson, the youth co-ordinator from Rural Frontenac Community Services (RFCS) appeared before Council as a delegate, A group of teenagers from Arden approached the RFCS Youth department of over the summer with concerns over feeling pulled into “unsafe activities” due to a lack of stimulation available in the local community. RFCS responded by holding a brainstorming session in early August and two other meetings, one in late August and one in early September. AS a result, they are setting up a biweekly drop-in as a pilot project this fall. RFCS is providing the staffing from its youth and family services departments, a private donor has come forward to pay for food, and in partnership with the Kennebec Recreation Committee, RFCS was seeking a waiving of $210 in hall rental fees for 7 Wednesdays between now and Christmastime. Council was happy to oblige.

Butter Tart Challenge brings a crowd to Sharbot Lake Farmers Market

There were 14 entries with names like Queen of Tarts, Love Made Edible, Bush Bunny Butter Tarts and Tartas del Capitan, but in the end there could be only one winner in the 4th annual Sharbot Lake Farmers Market Butter Tart Challenge at Oso Beach last Saturday. And that was Tanya Labelle, who won the challenge with Tanny’s Tarts with a top score of 208. Labelle said her father-in-law was instrumental in persuading her to enter the contest. “I’ve only been baking butter tarts for about seven years,” she said. “I got the recipe for the pie crust online but the filling is my mother’s recipe. “I entered last year but didn’t win but I’ll definitely be back next year (to defend her title).” Speaking of titles, organizer Andrea Duggan said not only does the winner get a $50 cheque, but also the “prestige and title of ‘best butter tart in Frontenac County.’” Second was the Mapelly Maple Tart submitted by The Maples restaurant and third was the Mommy & Me Mostly Maple Tart submitted by CoriAnne Newlove with scores of 203 and 182 respectively. Two of the more popular figures at the annual competition were Audrey Bateman and Natsuki Heese, who circulated around the crowd with samples of the tart being judged at the moment. Hazuki Heese served as the official tallier. The judges were Martha Merrill, Steve Blight, Anderson Bateman, Dave McNeil and Mike Procter.

Silver Lake Powwow has one of its biggest years ever

“A lot of things were different this year,” Silver Lake Powwow organizer said. “Shabot Obaadjiwan gave us some funding and so we didn’t charge for admission to the Powwow, only donations. “We were too busy to take a head count but by 2:30 p.m. there were 100 cars parked across the highway at the smoke shop. “There just was no parking left in the park.” One thing that was quite noticeable the minute you stepped through the gate was the colourful regalia. Not only were there more participants, but it seemed like their regalia was more elaborate than in recent memory. Often, the dance circle was a sea of magnificent colours the like of which hasn’t been seen before. Danka Brewer, who served as announcer said there was more word of mouth and advertising this year but she had another theory that contributed to the full arena this year. “I think a lot of dancers came out to show their respect and support for Annmarie Wilson, who passed away earlier this year,” she said. “I’ve been involved with the Powwow committee maybe 20 years and I’ve only seen it like this maybe once or twice. “For the Grand Entry both days, the Flag and Eagle staff Carriers had to wait at the Eastern Entrance while all the dancers filed into the arena.” And while the weather was quite hot, the arena was busy, with many dancers joining in, taking a break to get some water and/or sit a minute, and then joining back in. The heat becomes a factor when you consider everything the dancers are wearing but still they continued on. “It’s a workout, for sure,” Brewer said. “Anishinaabe aerobics.” But, she said, regalia forms a big part in the spirit of a powwow. “When you see Native dancers in regalia, that’s their best dress,” she said. “Many are wearing deer hide dresses, shawls, leggings, moccasins, breast plates, feather bustles, chaps. “In many cases, that can add up to more than 20 pounds and the songs they dance to last five minutes on average.” So why do they do it? “It’s a spirit journey,” Brewer said. “It’s prayer time and you’re dancing on behalf of the Creator.” All in all, the organizers were quite pleased with the way things went at the 24th annual Powwow, even if it was exhausting for many of them. “We were worked to the bone,” Brewer said, chuckling. “I’m going to need two weeks to recover.”

SOUTH FRONTENAC NEWS

Storrington meet the candidates event draws a good crowd

Storrington meet the candidates event draws a good crowd

It was a considerable attendance last Thursday night at the Storrington Centre as the Battersea Loughborough Lake Association hosted a meet the candidates event for residents to ask questions of the three Mayoralty candidates (incumbent Ron Vandewal, Coun. Mark Schjerning and Phi...

Grace Hall Scene of Big Sewing Bee

On Saturday, September 8, the members of Sydenham Women’s Institute turned Grace Hall into a well-organized workroom for members from five area counties to participate in an all-day sewing bee. Their goal: to produce, sort and prepare for shipping 1,000 items for the Canada Comforts Society, to be sent to children in need throughout Canada and the developing world. The items included baby clothes, girls’ dresses, boys’ shorts, sweaters, blankets, washcloths, diapers and socks. The hall was filled with work stations for cutting, sewing (14 machines arrived), ironing, inspection, vacuum bagging and packing. Thirty women worked all day, and many more dropped in with donations of fabric and clothing. A student volunteer acted as runner, assisted by Councillor Brad Barbeau. Mayor Vandewal  and David Townsend came to welcome the workers.  Linda Bates of Verona, the Kingston Area WI President, opened the day by thanking Southern Frontenac Community Services for donating the use of the hall, and soup for lunch, and Wilton Cheese and Wilton Wheat Kings for the cheese and bread. Bates says other donations came from Hartington Community Care, Harrowsmith Oddfellows and Rebeccas, and Sydenham area residents. At 9am the hall already had some tables heaped with new goods sent ahead of time by Institute members who could not be present. By the end of the day, 943 items were neatly packed for shipping, with promise of more to come. Bates has no question their very ambitious goal will be surpassed.

Jim Kelly – community linchpin, dead at 77

Jim Kelly had a distinguished career at Queen’s University, but what he is being remembered for in the days following his passing on Sunday, is his devotion to his family and the local humanitarian causes in Sydenham, Loughborough township and beyond. Jim was a long-time member of the Sydenham Lion’s Club, where he not only held every position on the executive at one time or another over the last 14 years, but also spearheaded the Vision Screening program at the elementary schools in Sydenham and Harrowsmith. He also founded a Lion’s golf tournament to fund the medic alert bracelet program in all of the school’s in South Frontenac. He was also one of the dedicated members of the Loughborough Christmas and Emergency Relief Committee, that provides Christmas baskets each year for dozens of families and also helps cover critical costs for families facing the threat of eviction, hydro disconnection, and other urgent situations. Jim also served on the Board of the Frontenac Community Futures Development Corporation. In 2013 he was named as a Volunteer of the Year by South Frontenac Council. He is survived by his wife Bev, daughter Alison and her partner David, and his son Christopher and his wife Karen, and grandchildren Sarah and Jason. For funeral or wake information, go to trousdalefuneralhome.com 

Inverary Youth facing $24,530 in unexpected expenses

Inverary Youth Activities came to South Frontenac Committee of the Whole Tuesday night in Sydenham asking for “$10,000 to $15,000” in financial support to offset “this year’s extreme and unforeseen expenses totalling $24,530 over normal year expenses.” Treasurer Judy Borovskis told COW that in a normal year, the organization takes in about $30,000 from various sources mostly related to activities at Ken Garrett Memorial Park in Inverary. In a normal year, that represents the break even point. But this year, the organization was faced with replacing foul ball nets ($16,240), underground wiring repair for diamond lights ($710), replacing a lawn mower ($7,380) and replacement of the canteen fridge. They’ve been able to pay the bills by borrowing the $9,545 in the playground fundraising account, she said but general costs between now and the start-up of next season (insurance, hydro, bank fees, property taxes, employee wages fro September and October and the initial float for starting up the canteen) total $8.616.32. When combined with paying back the playground fundraising account, the organization is $18,161.32 in the hole. Borovskis said they’ll continue fundraising through bottle drives and the advertising sign campaign. She said they’re looking at other possibilities such as doing lawn and diamond maintenance for the township park on Latimer Road for a fee, hosting children’s birthday events, a family fun day and a pizza dough sale. But the organization is facing washroom renovations to meet accessibility standards as well as work to the holding tank and a variety of other expenses. Councilors were in general sympathetic to the organization’s plight. “I would urge Council to support this application to cope with the burden they’ve got financially,” said Coun. Ron Sleeth. Mayor Ron Vandewal had some more practical and immediate suggestions. “There’s a lot of history here and I don’t think the youth group wants the Township to take over the fields,” Vandewal said. “But we do give them a $600 grant every year and looking at the property tax expense ($1,643.76) I think we can do something there. “We can’t waive taxes but we could increase the grant to the amount of the taxes. We’ve done that for other groups.” CAO/Clerk Wayne Orr said he could have a resolution prepared to that effect for next week’s Council meeting. Vandewal also suggested that the group approach the County for information on grants available for accessible washrooms and said that if some of the financial problems could wait for budget time, they could probably help more. “I think there’s potential for you cutting Township grass,” Vandewal said. “I’m sure you can do it cheaper than we can. “That’s just the way it works.”   • • • The South Frontenac Museum would like to focus more on the entire Township instead of just the “west side,” secretary Alan Boyce told COW. He said they’ve been working with Bedford district for use of empty rooms in the basement and have been discussing ways to create an “oral history” archive. However, like most organizations these days, lack of volunteers, particularly on the executive, remains a roadblock to many of their plans. “The big thing for us operationally is to get more people in,” Boyce said. “There’s no doubt the support we receive from the Township is substantial.” Boyce said one example of this is providing summer student Vanessa Kennedy, a third year museum administration student whom Coun. John McDougall described as “a crackerjack.” Anyone interesting in joining the museum board or executive is asked to contact Boyce at 613-985-8404 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or president Andy Adamson at 613-389-3619 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

South Frontenac Council – September 18

Interim Grant for Inverary Park Council voted to increase their annual $600 grant to Inverary Youth Activities Inc. by a further $1,050 drawn from the “Grants to Organizations” fund. Inverary Youth Activities Inc is a non-profit, volunteer-led group which has owned and operated Ken Garret Memorial park since 1975. The park has three ball diamonds, associated programs, a canteen and playground equipment (towards which SF Township granted $20,000 in 2017 for playground improvements.) The group has been very active and largely self-supporting until this last year, when they were faced with unforeseen capital expenses. Staff have been directed to explore several options for future support of this group, and will bring their recommendations to the 2019 budget process.   2019 Budget Cycle Because of the pending election, the Township’s budget process cannot begin as early as usual. Treasurer Fragnito has submitted a budget schedule to be presented to the new Council when it takes office in December. The goal is to have the new budget approved in early March at the latest.   Dog Park Overruns Council agreed to reallocate the $5,000 budgeted for a 2018 Skateboard Feasibility Study to fund unbudgeted expenses for the Centennial Dog park in Harrowsmith and the Point Multi Use Court fencing in Sydenham, on the understanding that the skateboard park will be included in the 2019 budget. Segsworth said that $5,000 will not be sufficient for the study.   Library Recognition Council has declared October to be Canadian Library Month; October 1420 will be Ontario Public Library Week. Our Public Libraries offer access to information, support per-al growth, economic renewal and quality of life and are a vital service to our communities.   Parking Restrictions Council voted to impose parking restrictions on Perth Road at the Devil Lake culvert, due to residents’ concerns about commercial fishing operations using the area at night. Parking restrictions on Moreland/ Dixon Road at Inverary Lake will be held over until staff discusses the problem with the adjoining property owner who rents out access to the launching sites there.   Re-titling of Management Team Council approved CAO Orr’s recommendation that the title of Public Works Manager be changed to Director of Public Services, and the title of Treasurer become Director of Corporate Services/ Treasurer. This is a housekeeping issue, and involves no change of roles.   Praise for Roads Department Councillor Sleeth said residents of Storrington have been very positively impressed with the work ethic of the road crew working at Lyons Landing, and both Mayor Vandewal and Councillor Barbeau commented on how successful the new Harrowsmith intersection and traffic lights have been at calming traffic without causing undue interruptions in traffic flow.

FRONTENAC COUNTY NEWS

Frontenac County Council politicians vote themselves a 27% wage increase

Frontenac County Council politicians vote themselves a 27% wage increase

Rejecting a consultants report which called for their wages to more than double in order to keep up wiht wages in other Counties, Frontenac County Council raised the pay for members of Council from $9,400 to $11,900 for the new council, which takes office on December 1st. The wag...

Fury Family Fun Day features equipment swap, sock sizing, barbecue

Frontenac Fury hockey organization president Lynn Newton welcomed the public to the Frontenac Community Arena Sunday for a get-together that featured sizing for hoodies and socks, an equipment swap, skate sharpening and an opportunity to meet new teammates and bench staff. “It’s also an opportunity to ask questions for everybody new to the organization,” she said. The Frontenac Fury Girls Hockey Association will field 10 teams this year including the First Shift program for those new to hockey, as well as five house league and three competitive teams (peewee, bantam and midget). “From atom to midget, our membership has quadrupled in the last five years,” she said. “They all drank the Kool-Aid.” She said more than 150 children have gone through the Fury and Frontenac Flyers programs in the past three years. Part of the reason for this get-together was registration for the upcoming season which is set to start Sept. 22 but (online) registration continues, she said. “You can still register online after the season starts,” she said. Another reason is for the players to get fitted for socks and hoodies. “The hoodies have the names of our sponsors on the back and the girls can wear them anywhere,” Newton said. “We used to put sponsors names on the individual jerseys but they’d have to be removed each off season and this preserves the jerseys a little while longer. “Plus, many of the girls tuck the jerseys inside their pants and you can’t see the sponsors’ names.” She said they want to see every girls who wants to play on the ice and there is (confidential) financial assistance available through the Jessie Arthur Bursary. Jessie Arthur was a young area athlete who succumbed to cancer. For information contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. The Arena opens Sept. 14 with a free skate from 6-7 p.m.

Landlord information sessions

Landlords in Frontenac County are encouraged to register to attend one of five rural landlord information sessions during the week of September 17-21. The purpose of the sessions is two-fold: One goal is to bring attention to the services provided by the Housing and Homelessness Collaborative that supports vulnerable families in Frontenac County stay sustainably housed. Workers based in Frontenac County will work with landlords and tenants with limited funding, referrals to other community services, and more. A second purpose is to hear from landlords in Frontenac County. As the program coordinator, Amanda Pantrey puts is, “There may be innovative ideas that landlords want to see. We will have municipal staff on hand for most of the sessions and together we can brainstorm ideas together that will encourage landlords.” “There is a tremendous shortage of rental housing options in Frontenac County,” adds Pantrey, “so we are encouraging people who are interested in renting to attend as well.” There will also be discussions about other unique approaches, such as co-housing. The dates, times and locations of the info sessions are as follows. Refreshments will be provided, and all participants are entered into a draw for a $150 gift card. Sep 17, 6:00pm–8:00pm, Grace Hall, Sydenham Sep.18, 10:00am–12:00pm, Oso Hall, Sharbot Lake Sep 18, 2:00pm–4:00pm, Clar-Mill Hall, Plevna Sep 19, 1:00pm–3:00pm, Storrington Centre, Sunbury Sep 20, 12:00 pm–2:00 pm, Lions Hall, Verona Southern Frontenac Community Services is one of three agencies working together in the Housing and Homelessness Collaborative that serves the County of Frontenac, administered by the City of Kingston’s 10-year Municipal Housing and Homelessness Plan. Rural Frontenac Community Services and Addiction Mental Health Services, KFL&A make up the rest of team. For more information and to register, contact Amanda Pantrey, at SFCSC, at 613-376-6477 ext. 208, or by email at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

#HikeCRCA Challenge Returns for 2018 With New Category

The first incarnation of the #HikeCRCA Challenge was such a roaring success with area residents and visitors last fall that the Cataraqui Region Conservation Authority (CRCA) has decided to bring it back for 2018. This is an opportunity for individuals, groups, or families to spend some quality time together in nature, exploring the various trails at CRCA-owned conservation areas, and possibly win some great prizes. The #HikeCRCA Challenge runs from 8am Sept. 1 to 8pm on Oct. 31, and features a simple, three-step process: First, hike the designated challenge trail at each of our conservation areas and at least one designated section of the CRCA-owned Cataraqui Trail and find the special challenge sign with the #HikeCRCA logo. To find the challenge trails, visit the website at the bottom of this article. The second step is to take a selfie with each of the challenges’ signs and post it to social media – Facebook, Twitter or Instagram – and make sure that the hashtag #HikeCRCA and the location are included in the post. Finally, once you have hiked the designated challenge trails at each of our eight conservation areas and the designated portion of the trail on the Cataraqui Trail, fill out the challenge form to enter our grand prize draw. All eligible entries as of the closing of the contest will be put into a random draw for the prizes. A special twist to this year’s event is a family-friendly challenge where a family only has to visit four out of the nine locations. They will be able to enter a draw for a special family challenge prize. Besides that and the regular grand prize, there will also be draws for four CRCA annual passes, which gives users free entry to both Little Cataraqui Creek Conservation Area and Gould Lake Conservation Area. The CRCA is appreciative of the generous sponsors who help make the #HikeCRCA Challenge a success: Atmosphere Kingston, Trailhead Kingston, County of Frontenac, Go Green Baby, and the County of Lennox & Addington. For more information, including full contest rules, visit www.crca.ca/hikecrca.

T & A’s Condiment Company

Tracey Jarvis-Craig loves hot sauces. Not only does she use hot sauce on just about everything, from breakfast to dinner, and likely on late night snacks as well, she likes to use different sauces with different dishes. That interest started her on a quest to make her own hot sauces. When friends and neighbours tasted her sauces, they asked if she could make some for them, and said they would buy her sauces if she was willing to sell. That’s when T&A’s Condiment Company came to be. Almost two years ago Tracey and her wife, Anne Craig, decided to get into the sauce and condiment business. That’s where the business got its name. In addition to the tomato-based hot sauces that they make, there are also lines of beer-based mustards and salsas available under the T&A Condiment Company brand. Their original sauce is still a staple for them. It is called Firewalker, and Tracey describes it as a “straight up hot sauce, excellent for dipping wings.” Although it has some pretty hot peppers in it, including habaneros, Tracey describes as “not crazy hot.” Backdraft is a sauce that appears mild and flavourful at first, “but the heat catches up with you a bit later” says Tracy about the most popular of the hot sauces. Fading Ember is a milder sauce with lots of fresh vegetable flavours such as celery, carrot, onion and garlic. Incendium is a genuinely hot sauce featuring a smoked hickory flavour, with habanero and ghost peppers providing much of the heat. It is T&A’s bestselling hot sauce. Part of the business model that Tracey and Anne have set out to develop is a collaborative approach with the community of producers that is developing in Frontenac County and vicinity. All of their tomatoes come from Sunharvest in Glenburnie, and they have struck up a relationship with Les and Nicole at Blended Roots Farm in Battersea, who are growing several varieties of peppers, as well as onions, carrots, and a number of other vegetables for them. As far as selling their product goes, they have been very active seeking out locations across the region, but particularly in Frontenac County. “The way we look at it, we are all in it together, and the more we can do to support the people who sell our sauces, mustards and salsa’s, the better off we all are,” said Anne, who handles a lot of the promotion and social media for the company. One key collaboration is with the King’s Town Beer Company from, you guessed it, Kingston, which provides all the beer for the three beer-based mustards T&A’s produces. The mustards are called Honey Hop, Amazon Ale, and Spankin Stout and recently a fourth mustard joined the others. This one is a beer free, yellow mustard, called 1904, which looks like a standard ball park mustard, but tastes “100 times better,” said Tracey. T&A also makes two kinds of salsas: Sword Swallower - a Sriracha lime salsa, and Strongman, a mild, smokey salsa. “We really started this business by the seat of our pants, learning on the fly and investing our own money into it. It’s a lot for us since we both work full time, but it’s a real passion for us as well,” Anne said. “We are serious about making this business a success.” T&A’s Condiment Company hit the market in April of 2017, and has been growing ever since, adding stores, participating in marketing opportunities at music and beer festivals, at the Springer Market in Kingston, and at one-time events such as the opening of Smart’s Mercantile in North Frontenac on the July 1 weekend. They make their sauces at a commercial church kitchen in Kingston, with which they have had a great relationship but are hoping commercial kitchen options open up in Frontenac County. They are also getting into sponsoring kids’ sports teams, a baseball team in their hometown of Sydenham and a Kingston-based hockey team. Tracey and Anne aren’t sure where their growing business will take them, they have been too busy keeping up with all of the momentum they have already created.

ADDINGTON HIGHLANDS NEWS

Addington Highlands Township will look at agreement to fix flooding road

Addington Highlands Township will look at agreement to fix flooding road

Addington Highlands Council agreed to pass the matter of flooding on Addington Road 5 over to its public works supervisor to see what can be done at its regular meeting Monday in Flinton. The decision followed a presentation from resident Erroll Ruth, who told Council that when ...

Alice Madigan – candidate for Reeve of Addington Highlands

Alice Madigan says that before and after she chose to run for Reeve she has been talking to constituents from all parts of the township and the message she heard was consistent and overwhelming “They want change,” she said, in an email interview early this week. Madigan was raised in Slate Falls, near Denbigh, and left the area for work. She moved back seasonally in 1991 and permanently in 2010. She became involved in the effort to maintain the Denbigh ambulance and as a volunteer on committees of the township, such as the policing and roads and waste management committee, and in 2014 she ran for council and lost out to Kirby Thompson and Tony Fritsch. She has remained as Chair of the Denbigh Ambulance Committee since then. She also teaches Sunday School and is a volunteer business manager for a children’s camp. Since her background is in business finances and management, she can provide a perspective on township finances if elected as Reeve. “I'm a very dedicated person with strong leadership skills who will serve the people honestly and diligently,” she said. She can be reached at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. of 613-333-9542

Milligans meats in Cloyne

A year ago Brian and Joanna Milligan decided they wanted to open a butcher shop in Cloyne. It had taken a long time to decide this was what they wanted to do. Brian worked as a butcher for Quinn’s abbatoir in Yarker when he was young but had gone on to do other things. Joanna had her own path as well, but they both ended up together in Cloyne on a rural property. And they got married on July 5th, 2017. Brian had returned to working Quinn’s a couple of days a week, “and although I liked the work, this time I knew I had to find something else for myself, and I told Brian Quinn that I wasn’t going to be back working full time for him. I knew that people missed having a butcher in Cloyne ever since Cloyne Village Foods closed, and people encouraged us to think about opening one” said Brian last week, during a lull in the now thriving shop Once they realised opening their own shop was what they wanted to do, finding a location was the next step, and that took some time. The former Cloyne Home Hardware store is located really close to their Snider Road property but it was not the first place they looked at. “We thought it was a much larger building than we needed,” said Joanna. But eventually they took a look at it, figuring they could use as much of the building as they needed at first, and find something that fits in the rest of it. In February, they looked seriously at the building, and consulted with the people at the Prince Edward/Lennox and Addington Community Futures Development Corporation (PELA CFDC). “They really encouraged us. They looked at our numbers and said it could work, and helped with funding as well,” said Joanna. By the end of February they owned the building and from then on it has been a constant string of long days and short sleeps. They carved out a third of the building for the butcher shop, sold off or moved everything into another part of the building they are now using for storage, built a butcher shop and retail area, and were ready and approved to open by July, a quick turnaround. The store area is done in deep reds and black, giving the store a very contemporary feel. “I wanted to open an Irish Pub and Brian wanted a butcher shop, so I made a shop that feels like a pub,” said Joanna, who designed the store. “The butcher shop is visible from the front, however, and it is bright and clean. They just missed opening on Canada Day weekend, and opened instead on the 5th of July, their first anniversary. “We really wanted to be open right at the start of summer, but given how buy we were when we opened on the 5th, I’m kind of glad we missed the long weekend,” said Brian. Since they have opened, they have been overwhelmed by the community support they have received. “We are committed to quality, custom cuts, talking to people about what they want to eat, and bringing in the best products, not only the meat, which we get from Quinn’s, but cheese and other products as well, and people have really responded to that. They want us to succeed and they appreciate the efforts we are making,” said Brian. As the summer begins to wind down, Joanna and Brian are finally taking the opportunity to start thinking about the winter phase of their business. One of the first orders of business will be to complete the construction and licensing of a second work space for a wild meat abattoir in time for moose and deer season. “That’s a service we know is needed in this community and the region as well,” said Brian. Other work will be done on bringing other specialty food in for customers. “We would love to be able to offer local wine or beer to customers, just like we want to be able to offer local food, but that is not going to happen in Ontario just now,” said Joanna, “but we will be working on web promotions, putting together different meat orders for people, a bunch of things that we haven’t had a chance to do because the summer has been so busy we have really only been trying to keep up.” One thing that hasn’t been rushed at Milligan’s is service. Not only are the staff engaged with customers, Brian likes to use some added touches reminiscent of the old idea of a village butcher shop. “I thought, from the start, that I would use butcher paper and string, instead of tape. It doesn’t take a lot longer to wrap a piece of meat in paper and grab string off a roll, tie it and cut the string instead of slapping on tape, and I like doing it. Customers like it as well, even young ones who don’t remember the way butcher shops used to be,” said Brian. Joanna and Brian see their shop, and some of the other efforts people are making in business, as a new beginning for Cloyne and area. They hope to find another business to use the rest of the building in time, but before they do that they are focussing on making Milligan’s meats a success. And one year after coming up with the idea, they have already made an impressive start.

Fresh produce at reduced prices in five pilot locations

Good Food Stands increase access to healthy food Food Access has emerged as a theme for poverty reduction in Kingston and Area, providing enhanced access to sufficient, safe and nutritious food for all residents of KFL&A. As part of the community’s Poverty Reduction Initiative, United Way of KFL&A and the City of Kingston co-chaired a Food Advisory Committee. The committee has worked diligently over the past year to develop strategies to address food access. With input from service providers and people with lived experience of poverty and food insecurity, an initiative has just been launched to make fresh produce more readily available and affordable for everyone in the community. On August 27, Good Food Stands will begin popping up across Kingston, Frontenac, Lennox and Addington, as part of a 12-month pilot project to provide improved food access for individuals and households in our region. Good Food Stands will be open to the public once a month, offering a variety of fresh produce at reduced prices. No appointment is needed and the community is invited to experience the friendly atmosphere of shopping. The stands are located at five secondary schools throughout the region, including Sydenham High School in Frontenac County. The locations and schedule for each Good Food Stand can be found at www.goodfoodstand-kfla.ca/ “We recognize that many people experience barriers to accessing sufficient, safe and nutritious food,” says Bhavana Varma, President & CEO of United Way of KFL&A. “It is our hope that the program will make it easier for people across the region to access fresh produce, and as a result, eat healthier. “We are excited about all of the multi-sectoral partnerships that made this initiative come together.” The Good Food Stand pilot is a collaborative effort with many partners across the region who have come together to co-develop and launch this initiative. The focus is on providing a local, sustainable solution to address food access and its root causes, and on making a difference in our community. Tony Deodato & Sons Ltd. will supply fresh produce that in turn will be sold to the public at a reduced price. Local school boards and their unions have worked together to arrange for program delivery and support from school volunteers at five high schools in the region. A coordinator from Kingston Community Health Centres will facilitate program delivery at each school from 3pm to 5:30pm for one afternoon each month during the year. The use of schools as hubs to connect to community provides lots of opportunity for expansion of the program in the future and provides connections to other programs and initiatives. The Good Food Stand initiative is supported by the KFL&A Food Access Advisory Committee and co-funded by the City of Kingston, United Way of KFL&A, and the Community Foundation for Kingston & Area. In-kind marketing and evaluation support have been provided by KFL&A Public Health. For more information about the Good Food Access plan for KFL&A and a complete schedule for the five Good Food Stand locations in KFL&A, visit: www.goodfoodstand-kfla.ca or email Good Food Stand Coordinator, Kathy Sturmey, at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Merritta Parks marks 100 years!

On August 1, Pine Meadow celebrated a very special birthday. This day marked 100 years of age for this very remarkable woman. “It was quite a busy party they had for me at the Lion’s Centre [in Northbrook]. There were people coming and going all afternoon,” she said on Tuesday morning over the phone from the nursing home as she was getting ready to head out to the weekly Drop-In in Northbrook. It is no surprise that the hall was filled, as Merritta has quite a large immediate family. She has 11 children, “13 if you count the two who passed away, one at ten months and one at 6 weeks,” she recalled. She also has 31 grandchildren, and as great grandchildren are concerned, she isn’t exactly sure how many there are. “There were 50-some the last time we counted,” she said. Her family were out in force that day as most of her children, the youngest of whom is in their 60s, live within the local region, and she has one living in Napanee and one in Oshawa. Alongside family and friends, Merritta cut the cake and ate some as well, while entertained by musical band “Dave & Marg.” Pine Meadow staff provided reflections and fun facts of what she has been witness to over the past 100 years, everything from black & white television to iPods and PS4s! Merritta was raised on a farm on the Flinton Road, and when she was 14 she started working in a boarding house at Kaladar, later working in the kitchen at the Kaladar hotel. The hotel was located south of Highway 7 when she first worked there, before it was moved by being loaded onto logs pulled by horses to its eventual location north of the highway. When she married, she lived on a farm near Kaladar, and her husband worked in logging and construction. He worked at Sawyer Stoll in Northbrook for a time, and there was very little work in the area when the children were young, so he eventually began working in construction in Kingston, leaving every week on Monday morning and returning on Friday night as Merritta maintained the household. “It wasn’t easy,” Merritta said. The kids ended up going to school in Cloyne, and when her youngest was four, Merritta started working at the gas station in Northbrook (now the Northbrook Petrocan station). When her husband retired, she was talked into retiring as well. He died a number of years ago and Merritta moved to the Pine Grove apartment complex in Northbook, where she lived for over 20 years before moving to Pine Meadow 3 years ago. With her characteristic dry humour, she said that at Pine Meadow “I get fed good and they don’t make me work,” although she does have to chair a meeting once a month since she is the President of the Resident Council at Pine Meadow. Although she does not leave the home every day, Merritta is active at the home, taking part in activities in and around the home. She also gets to Church when she can, having been a member of the congregation at the Bethel Pentecostal Church for many, many years, since long before the current church building was constructed in 1972. “Merritta is a wonderful asset to Pine Meadow and we look forward to many more celebrations with her!” said a release from Pine Meadow marking her birthday. She said that her memory is not as good as it used to be as she prepared to hang up the phone to leave for the Drop-In on Tuesday morning, her voice strong and assured. She must have had a pretty good one back in the day.

EDITORIALS

  • Is Sydenham on the wane as the centre of the South Frontenac universe?
    There was a 100% increase in the number of stoplights in Frontenac County when the new light was switched on at Road 38 and the Wilton Road in Harrowsmith a couple of weeks ago. Both of the stoplights are located in South Frontenac. There is one on Perth Road in…
    Written on Wednesday, 19 September 2018 09:53 in Editorials
  • The Limestone School Board trustee election just got a lot more interesting
    (The following has been edited since being published in the print version of the Frontenac News on September 13, to include statements from PaulaMurray, the chair of the Board of Trustess with the Limestone Board) Eleven candidates for Limestone School Board Trustee, including one in South Frontenac, have signed on…
    Written on Thursday, 13 September 2018 09:27 in Editorials
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LETTERS

  • Statement from Limestone District School Board Chair Paula Murray
    (Editors note - Last week we ran a column in which LDSB Trustee Mahoney was quoted concerning the attempt he was about to make to take back his seat at a meeting of the Board of Trustees on Wednesday, September 12. As is made clear in the following, he was…
    Written on Wednesday, 19 September 2018 09:52 in Letters
  • Re- Limestone School Board
    Thank you for your excellent editorial on Limestone School Board policy for muzzling critics, concealing information from taxpayers and suppressing debate.  It is hard to believe, and equally sad, that some seemingly dictatorial board members are empowered to direct the education of Canadian youth toward leadership roles in a nation…
    Written on Wednesday, 19 September 2018 09:52 in Letters
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