Featured News

Verona Car Show founder 'still part of it'

Verona Car Show founder 'still part of it'

Written By: Craig Bakay | Published: August-15-2018 | Category: SOUTH FRONTENAC
Tagged Under: Verona, Events, People

Back in 1995, the economic picture in Verona wasn’t quite what many thought it could be. “We’d lost the GM dealership and some stores,” said Ed Asselstine. That’s when ...

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Merritta Parks marks 100 years!

Merritta Parks marks 100 years!

Written By: News Staff | Published: August-15-2018 | Category: ADDINGTON HIGHLANDS
Tagged Under: People, Northbrook, Pine Meadow

On August 1, Pine Meadow celebrated a very special birthday. This day marked 100 years of age for this very remarkable woman. “It was quite a busy party they had for me at the Lion’s Cent...

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Vandals attack…begonias and gazanias?

Vandals attack…begonias and gazanias?

Written By: Jeff Green | Published: August-15-2018 | Category: CENTRAL FRONTENAC
Tagged Under: Sharbot Lake, OPP, restaurant

Phil and Lorrette Gray of the Maples restaurant can’t figure it out. Nor can Trina Wilson, the gardener who for the last six years has been diligently working the garden beds that surround the r...

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Burger Day showcases local products available at farmers market

Burger Day showcases local products available at farmers market

For the past three years, one of the more popular events at the Sharbot Lake Farmers Market has been burger day. That’s the day they set up the barbecue and make you a locally-sourced burger wit...

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Cloyne art show been helping students for 46 years

Cloyne art show been helping students for 46 years

The Cloyne Showcase Art & Craft Sale just turned 46, and although the number of exhibitors was down slightly this year, most of the exhibitors reported they were doing just fine, boding well for t...

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Election fever in North Frontenac? Only among Catholics

Since all of the positions for North Frontenac Council (Mayor Ron Higgins, Coun. Fred Perry, Wayne G...

July forest fire will result in $14,000 budget overage, says Central Frontenac chief

Central Frontenac will look at putting some money into reserves to cover potential wild fires after ...

Don’t miss the Parham Fair this weekend

The end of summer brings many things, and one of them is the 126th annual Parham Fair, which takes p...

NFLT Summer Camp

There are nine aspiring young actors participating in a drama camp sponsored by NFLT this August. Ti...

Eighth annual Frontenac Frolic more than just cow flop bingo

While the Frontenac Frolic is “geared towards children,” organizer Susan O’Brien M...

Land O’Lakes Traditional Music Hall of Fame adds eight to its roster

It was a hot day Saturday as the Land O’Lakes Traditional Music Hall of Fame inducted its clas...

Motorcycle group asks Council for road pass group discount

The Bytown Motorcycle Association would like to use part of the Arcol Road for its Calabogie Boogie ...

Verona celebrates summer with free afternoon lunch and music

It seems the Verona Community Association just can’t not let summer pass without some sort of ...

Art in the Sawmill returns to Verona for sixth year

Since 2013, Verona’s Art in the Sawmill has hosted an eclectic summer show of quilters, crafte...

Donations to land conservancy help nature, can provide financial benefits

“It’s just for nature to do what nature does,” Vicki Schmolka of the Land Conserva...

NORTH FRONTENAC NEWS

Election fever in North Frontenac? Only among Catholics

Election fever in North Frontenac? Only among Catholics

Since all of the positions for North Frontenac Council (Mayor Ron Higgins, Coun. Fred Perry, Wayne Good, Gerry Martin, Vernon Hermer, John Inglis and Fred Fowler) have been acclaimed, as well as Limestone District School Board trustee Karen McGregor and French Language Public Sch...

Motorcycle group asks Council for road pass group discount

The Bytown Motorcycle Association would like to use part of the Arcol Road for its Calabogie Boogie event Sept. 8 and 9 this year, and were at North Frontenac Council’s regular meeting Friday in Plevna with a proposal. The thing is, Arcol Road is one of North Frontenac’s Crown Land access roads, and it costs $12.95 for a use permit. “We’re only going to be on it for like, three minutes,” said Chris Davis, president of the Bytown Motorcycle Association. “Our ridership for this event is limited to 200, so we’re thinking like $3 each.” Davis said they’d like to enter into some type of long-term arrangement with the Township for use of its roads and trails. “We’d like to work with staff for an appropriate relationship and fee structure,” he said. “We do trail maintenance and have a relationship with two ATV clubs and we’ve come up with $200,000 in grants.” Greg Banks, Calabogie Boogie chair, said the bikes used by their membership aren’t specifically off-road or motocross bikes, more of the “enduro” variety with head and tail lights and spark arrestors in the 100-500 cc range. CAO Cheryl Robson said the Township does have a fees bylaw, but changing it would require a public meeting, and the only available date would be the Aug. 24 meeting. “I don’t know if we’ve given exemptions in the past or refused them,” Robson said. “We’d probably have to wait for Corey (Klatt, manager of community development) to get back from vacation for the answer to that.” “I’m concerned that the ATV users might be annoyed if we gave you a discount,” said Coun. John Inglis. “I think we’re trying to rush into this,” said Coun. Wayne Good. “There are still many questions.” “I agree, and it’s kind of short notice,” said Mayor Ron Higgins. “And our hands are tied for this meeting. “Maybe next meeting.” Council instructed staff to look into it to see if something could be arranged both long and short term.   • • • Council held a moment of silence for former North Frontenac Fire Chief Cor Bakelarr, who died last week. Bakelarr was chief in 2004-2005.   • • • Council passed a resolution to pass on its concerns about a proposed boat launch at the Palmerston Lake Marina, but since it’s on private property, there doesn’t seem to be much else it can do. The biggest issue seems to be that in order to launch larger boats, it’s almost inevitable that launchers will have to encroach on Road 509. “A lot of people can’t back up a boat trailer that’s 45 feet long,” said Coun. Wayne Good. “I don’t know if there’s anything we can do, but I’m not for it.” “They’re still using our road,” said Dep. Mayor Fred Perry. “I don’t think it’s viable.” “People will put in 55-foot trailers and it will affect traffic on 509,” said Coun. John Inglis. “I think we do have the right to step on some toes.” “I don’t think we have any legal right to mitigate and potential issues at this point,” said Mayor Ron Higgins. “I think we could do something about it if we had enough concerns about it,” said Inglis. “Darwyn’s (public works manager Sproule) trying to make it as safe as we can with speed reductions, brushing and signage (‘hidden entrance/no U-turns’),” said CAO Cheryl Robson. “We should put in guardrails so people can’t make a left turn,” said Good.   Coun. John Inglis spelled out in no uncertain terms what he thinks about rules preventing the Palmerston Lake Restoration Project. “The Township doesn’t own it, the Mississippi Valley Conservation Authority does,” Inglis said. “They can’t sell it without permission from the Ministry and when the Township tried to buy it, boundary issues surfaced. “I think this is a tragedy of bureaucracy.”

Fiddlers and Friends Return to Ompah

Fiddlers and Friends return for their yearly concert in Ompah on Thursday, August 9. The band loves to share their joy of music and zany sense of fun. They play a cheerful set of old-time fiddle tunes that has the audience clapping, toe-tapping and singing along. The fiddlers are accompanied by friends playing keyboard, bass, viola, cello, guitar, etc. Lois Webster is an unforgettable crowd favourite with her many homemade instruments and wacky costumes; one never quite knows what she will do next, and even keeps the band guessing. Fiddlers and Friends are delighted to entertain the Ompah audiences, who readily join in to become a real part of the concert. Folks often comment that it is such a fun concert that it feels like a kitchen party. Audiences are always left wanting more. The Fiddlers and Friends concert on Thursday, August 9 at 7pm is a fundraiser for the Ompah Community Centre. Admission is $10 at the door. Following the concert, musicians and audience can mingle over refreshments. For further information, contact Marily Seitz (613-479-2855).  

Cemeteries in North Frontenac To Be A Focal Point for CMCA in 2019

CMCA plans to undertake a comprehensive study of the 15 cemeteries in North Frontenac. The research work is planned to begin in the summer of 2019. CMCA will be looking for a partnership with the township for this extensive project and to many community members who have knowledge of specific cemeteries. Training of CMCA members and the North Frontenac Township staff, Sonia McLuckie, began on June 29. The Ontario Genealogical Society Cemetery Committee Chair, Joe Wilson, did an amazing job sharing the steps and process required to complete a cemetery study. Topics such as GIS mapping, websites to use, resource books to access, checklists to complete, and transcribing data were covered. The work session included a visit to a local cemetery, where participants learned how to detect unmarked graves, and learned about a cleaning process for tombstones, which was remarkable. More information will be shared with the public as this project gets underway. CMCA also received training from the Ontario Historical Society in July to address the handling and storage of archival material. We hope to preserve collected/donated materials for future generations in a manner recommended by the OHS.

Ompah Community Association has been busy, finances healthy, AGM hears

The Ompah Community Association is in good shape financially, even after buying liability insurance and paying $5,000 to the Township for renovations to the kitchen, the Association heard at its Annual General Meeting Saturday morning in Ompah. The cash balance as of July 21, 2018 is $8,127.76 “We decided not to incorporate because that only protects the membership, not the executive,” said President Rob Harris. “So we’re an unregistered association. “But we needed the insurance, which includes some legal advice because all it takes is for someone to trip over a loose cord for us to get sued.” He said recent projects of the association have been a move-in package for new residents, addressing the “noticeable decline in attendance” at events (a recent dance was cancelled because only two tickets were sold) and approaching North Frontenac Council for help in refurbishing the floor at the Hall. “We were told there’s no budget for that,” he said. They also formed a committee, chaired by Janet Arther, to look into a beach on Palmerston Lake, discussed communication strategies including a new FaceBook Page, announced that there is $334.40 in the Birthday Bash Benevolent Fund and asked for more contributions to the Memory Wall. Harris also noted that the Hall has been opened as an official cooling off spot when temperatures warrant. Two spots on the executive were open. Rob Harris and Dave Young were elected to fill them. What positions they will take will have to wait for the executive meeting. “We elect people to the executive and decide at the first executive committee meeting what hats they will wear,” said Harris. After the meeting, the Canada 150 mural by Gleva Lemke was unveiled.               Marily Seitz and John Walters unveil the Canada 150 mural at the Ompah Community Centre. The mural, painted by local artist Gleva Lemke, features the names of many area residents. “The names just kept on coming,” said Seitz. Photo/Craig Bakay

CENTRAL FRONTENAC NEWS

Vandals attack…begonias and gazanias?

Vandals attack…begonias and gazanias?

Phil and Lorrette Gray of the Maples restaurant can’t figure it out. Nor can Trina Wilson, the gardener who for the last six years has been diligently working the garden beds that surround the restaurant. Starting pretty much as soon as she began transplanting annuals in J...

Burger Day showcases local products available at farmers market

For the past three years, one of the more popular events at the Sharbot Lake Farmers Market has been burger day. That’s the day they set up the barbecue and make you a locally-sourced burger with (just about) all the trimmings coming from the area as well. “It’s as local as we can make it,” said burger barista Kate Howes, who took over this year as organizer from Dean Wedden. “They asked for a volunteer, so I volunteered,” she said. “We pushed it back a couple of weeks so we could have local tomatoes and lettuce. “Unfortunately, nobody’s onions were ready yet.” OK, so other than the onions, mustard and ketchup, everything comes from the area. First, you go see Kate and pay for your burger. You can have the basic burger for $5 (but really, isn’t the point to load it up with local veggies?) or the “locavore” for $5.50. Cheese from the Wilton Cheese Factory will bump your burger up to $6. Then you go over to Erik Zierer at the barbecue donated by the Masons Lodge and get your bun (from The Corner Bakery) and your patty (from Tryon Farm and/or Whan Farm). Then you go back to Howes to have her load it up for you. The lettuce and tomatoes came from Learning Curve Garden and there were also sprouts (speckled pea micro shoots to be exact) from Unusual Acres. The final touch was relish and pickles from Maple Lim Farm. (And if you didn’t get the pickles…big mistake. Excellent pickles for a burger.) “And then you also get a (mini) butter tart from Simple and Sweet,” Howes said. Howes said the idea behind burger day is to showcase some of the local products available. It’s also kind of fun in a foodie sort of way.

July forest fire will result in $14,000 budget overage, says Central Frontenac chief

Central Frontenac will look at putting some money into reserves to cover potential wild fires after this summer’s blaze July 12 to July 20 east of Arden Road to the Stone Mills Township boundary. In his report to Council’s regular meeting Tuesday in Sharbot Lake, Fire Chief Greg Robinson said that while there were no injuries due to the fire and no buildings lost, the Central Frontenac Fire department did suffer some equipment loss and the expenditure of consumables such as foam that could lead to an overage on the emergency response capital budget of about $8,000 and an overage of the operating budget of about $14,000. “Central Frontenac Fire and Rescue (CFFR) received direct firefighting assistance from Ministry of Natural Resources fire rangers and helicopters, our mutual aid partners from Stone Mills, South Frontenac, North Frontenac and Kingston Fire,” Robinson said. “CFFR firefighters worked long and hard hours during the eight days of firefighting and due to extreme dry conditions, the fire burned underground and traveled unseen through tree roots and rock crevices, making extinguishment very challenging. “During large wild fires, equipment gets destroyed or damaged and small items get lost (and) some of the equipment suffered damage due to being too old and not well maintained.” Robinson said a Mark 3 pump is unrepairable and represents a loss of $5,398. Other loses include a hose back pack, two hose stranglers, four nozzles, gated Wye, $1,836 worth of hose, $1,200 worth of foam, water and food for a total cost of $10,315 in losses. He said the destroyed and lost equipment has been replaced with newly purchased equipment through the emergency response equipment capital budget. While Council agreed to look at a new reserve fund, Treasurer Michael McGovern said that since it’s impossible to predict when these emergencies might occur, general reserves are usually used to make up such shortfalls. Waste Audit Central Frontenac will be participating in a “waste audit” Aug. 20-31, Council heard at its regular meeting Tuesday night in Sharbot Lake. Clerk-Administrator Cathy MacMunn told Council this is a County initiative and Central Frontenac was chosen as the test site to determine what’s going into landfills. Part of the exercise will be to look into garbage bags to determine if recycling is still being put into bags. “Should we be publicizing this?” said Coun. Bill MacDonald. “This could be a public relations issue if people come in and have their garbage examined?” “I think they want to see what’s going in the landfills on an ongoing basis,” said Mayor Frances Smith. MacMunn said the Oso (Crow Lake Road) site has been chosen for the audit and it was her understanding that people won’t have to wait around while their bags are checked. “They just want to have somebody open them up and audit what’s going in,” she said. Gap analysis Still with fire, Robinson said there will be one more report before his final one on the fire and emergency gap analysis. He said that many of the areas have and are being addressed but one area of concern is still the recruitment and retention of firefighters. “We’ve developed a training program but not yet implemented it,” Robinson said. “We’re still tweaking it and not yet getting sufficient ‘buy-in’. “We want to take baby steps with it but the first step is going to be a big change for our firefighters.” “The term you used, ‘buy-in,’ tweaked my interest,” said Coun. Phillip Smith. “How are you going to go about getting that?” “There’s a big section about that in the report,” Robinson said. “There’s a thing called trench culture. “People have been doing things in certain ways for years and fire services are notorious for that.” Mandatory septic redux Council passed a resolution asking staff to bring back a mandatory septic system inspection bylaw for a future Council meeting even though many of the details such as cost to residents ($100 of the expected $125 was mentioned) have yet to be worked out. Dep. Mayor Tom Dewey, who is a member of the committee studying the issue said they want to get the bylaw passed first and then settle on the details. Legion get tax break Council passed a bylaw to exempt the Legion branches in Sharbot Lake and Arden from the municipal (township and county) portion of their taxes for a further 10 years. Legions still pay the education portion of their taxes. Cemeteries to be assumed Council asked for a report on whether or not to assume the St. Paul’s Zealand Cemetery. Concerns were raised as to how many other cemeteries there are in the Township in similar situations. Consensus was there are at least four or five. Shared Services Council also passed bylaws concerning a shared services agreement with North Frontenac and establishing the Kennebec Wilderness Trail. CBO search on again Council decided to continue advertising for a new Chief Building Official as they were looking for more qualifications than those offered by the three applications they did receive. Alan Revill will continue in the job until a replacement is found.

Don’t miss the Parham Fair this weekend

The end of summer brings many things, and one of them is the 126th annual Parham Fair, which takes place this weekend, August 18th and 19th, at the Parham Fairgrounds. This year brings new features; Blackrock Climbing’s Obstacle Course, Jumpy Castle, and Cross-Fit Tower. Its not the only way to have some friendly competition with your friends and neighbours – the weekend is filled with events for everyone. For the kids, a Parham Fair weekend wouldn’t be complete without the egg toss and the pie eating contest. Sure, you might get a little messy, but victory is sweet, and this might be your year. There are many other games to compete in as well. On Sunday’s pet show, show off your dog, cat, or anything you call a pet. Many kids around Parham are spending this week with nets trying to catch the fastest jumping frogs for the Frog Jumping Contest. As memories serve, this is a finely tuned balance of species, size, and instinct! Of course, others are completing their crafts and baking for the Palace competition, right alongside their parents and grandparents. The Palace shows off all the talent our community has to offer – everything from cookies, and quilts, photography to giant zucchinis. The judging wraps up around noon on Saturday, and a line-up can be seen for anxious competitors waiting to see who has come out on top this year! If you have always thought about entering – this is your year. Memberships can be purchased at Hope’s General Store for $10, which covers all entries. Items for the Palace need to be dropped off at the fairgrounds between 5 -8pm on Friday evening. If you still haven’t purchased your membership, you can also do it when you drop off your exhibits. The Cattle Show begins bright and early on Saturday. Even if you know nothing about cows, its pretty fun to try and pick the winners. Everyone has worked very hard with their animals to prepare them for the event, and its great to see their hard work pay off. In the afternoon, stick around for the Horse Draw. Choose your favourite team and cheer them on, as the weight is added and added again. Maintaining and training these horses is a labour of love, and watching them work together is always wonderful. For those new to agriculture, or if you just like seeing farm animals up close, the Livestock Exhibit is located next to the Palace. It features many of the animals raised on the Tryon family farm as well as poultry from Treegap Farm. There will also be someone there to tell you about the animals all day. New to the fair this year is a Silent Auction and Toonie Raffle. Generous craftspeople and business owners have donated many Community finds honour and strength in traditions such as plowing match by Catherine Reynolds items to bid on. Visit the Fair’s Facebook page to see some of the lots that are being offered and come visit the Palace, on Saturday, to place a bid or play. All proceeds from both events go to the Parham Agricultural Society and will contribute to next year’s fair. Live music is always a staple at the fair. This year, the music starts at 3:30 and features the talents of several local artists. First in the line-up is folk singer Chris Morris, who performs original work as well as a wide range of popular musicians from Pete Seeger to Bob Dylan. Next up is local favourite fiddle sensation Jessica Wedden, who will be performing with Reilly Donnelly, a talented young country and rock musician. Rounding out the musical line-up is local band After the News, with their folk-rock set. Featuring band members Lee Casement, James Robert Young, Shaun Weima, & Mike Verner, it’s going to be a great way to close down Saturday night at the fair. Sunday at the fair brings the much-loved Demolition Derby. Run for the second year by Dave Cox and Mitch McVeigh, it features four different classes of automotive destruction. Always a popular event, the entire day of the fair is devoted to the Derby.

NFLT Summer Camp

There are nine aspiring young actors participating in a drama camp sponsored by NFLT this August. Tim White, choreographer and director, has coordinated a drama program for the kids along with co-facilitator Barb Scantlebury. Although some of the participants have had experience on stage before in NFLT productions, three have not. Last Friday, I enjoyed watching what they had been working on since the camp started on Tuesday, August 7. Their introductory song and dance number will definitely be a show stopper. It is a mashup of four songs from The Greatest Showman, and the kids were doing very well with the choreography that Tim provided. The campers have chosen to perform a scene from two previous productions. One scene is from the show Aladdin and the other is from the recent spring show this year, The Little Mermaid. The kids have learned their lines quickly and this Monday had to rehearse without scripts. Tim and Barb are putting them through their paces in a very limited time-frame. This Thursday, they will present their show at the band shell at Sharbot Lake beach as part of the entertainment for people attending the Community BBQ. The show will begin at 5:30 and go till approximately 6pm. You might even call this “dinner theatre.” Remember to bring a lawn chair. It is time to start putting together a production crew for our fall show entitled “The Red Plaid Shirt” by Canadian playwright Michael Wilmot. We need a director (experienced), producer, set designer, and stage crew. This play has a small cast of two females and two males of retirement age. It is a comedy based on the theme of facing retirement. Both men have different ways of dealing with this sudden change in their lives, and therein lies the humour. With a little subtle redirection from their wives, they find the right track…eventually. Please contact us at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. if you wish to get involved and assist us in this production, or call me, Pamela Giroux, at 613-279-2961.

SOUTH FRONTENAC NEWS

Verona Car Show founder 'still part of it'

Verona Car Show founder 'still part of it'

Back in 1995, the economic picture in Verona wasn’t quite what many thought it could be. “We’d lost the GM dealership and some stores,” said Ed Asselstine. That’s when he and fellow antique car enthusiast Larry Teal got an idea. “We thought ...

Verona celebrates summer with free afternoon lunch and music

It seems the Verona Community Association just can’t not let summer pass without some sort of get-together. This year, it was Verona Celebrates Summer in the Village, last Sunday at the Lions Hall complex. The food was free (hot dogs, ice cream and vegetarian pizza donated by Gino’s in Harrowsmith), as was the music (The KingsTown Tenors). “Last year, we had the ecumenical service,” said co-organizer Linda Bates. “This is the first year we’ve done this. “We like to do something.” Bates said they used to do Music in the Park at McMullen Beach, but felt they needed a bigger space. “We needed more room for the barbecue, the train and crafts,” she said. “By having the barbecue out here, all the mess stays outside and then we can move indoors for music.” Bates said this won’t be the last summer event in Verona, pointing out that they’ll be hosting the annual car show next weekend (Aug. 12). Sixteen volunteers manned the event, but there was another aspect to this gathering. Supervisor Melissa Elliott brought the EarlyON program to the Verona event. “We operate six days a week and there will be a permanent place in Sydenham shortly,” she said. “But we will bring programs to north of Hwy. 7. “Right now, we’re going to many events like this one to advertise the program. “We put the stuff out (crafts and games), the kids come over and then we get to talk to the parents.”

Art in the Sawmill returns to Verona for sixth year

Since 2013, Verona’s Art in the Sawmill has hosted an eclectic summer show of quilters, crafters, image-makers and artists, and this year was no exception. From the jewelry of Carolyn Boyle and Bill Anderson to the animal depictions of Lisa Ferguson and Katie Ohlke (loved the bear), there was a wide range of visual interpretations on display last Saturday and Sunday in the old converted mill house. One of the more intriguing entries this year is newcomer Elaine Farragher, whose acrylic landscapes often feature scenes of the K & P Trail, many featuring water. But as interesting as her above-water scenes are, perhaps her most fascinating works are those that take place below the water’s surface, featuring what’s going on with the area’s fish population. “I’ve begun snorkeling where we live on Hambly Lake,” she said. “When you look under the water, there are so many fish. “And I actually do like painting fish.” She said there are lots of fishermen on her lake and her paintings lead to discussions. Her fish paintings also include a lot of bubbles, understated, but still a fascinating inclusion. “I also love painting bubbles,” she said. “And maybe the underwater scenes are an excuse to paint them, but it’s mostly the fish. “Especially the perch — they’re so pretty.” Farragher started painting in her 20s but stopped for about 30 years while living in Toronto. “I took some night courses in Toronto, but that was about it,” she said. “When we moved to this area about 12 years ago, well, I couldn’t not paint. “This is a very inspiring area.” Farragher works in acrylics from photos downloaded to her laptop. “I don’t have a lot of room where I work,” she said. “Just enough for an easel and the laptop. “But I did get an underwater camera.”

Works manager confident major projects will be done by Labour Day

Public Works Manager Mark Segsworth said he’s confident the Township’s three major projects for this summer will be completed by Labour Day. Segsworth was responding to a question from Coun. Mark Schjerning at South Frontenac Council’s regular meeting Tuesday night (the only Council meeting scheduled for August). Segsworth said asphalt is scheduled for this week and next on the Harrowsmith intersection, Harrowsmith-Rutledge Road and Bedford Road projects. “Weather permitting we should have everything completed, including the line painting, by Labour Day,” Segsworth said. “This has been a stifling hot summer and I can’t say enough about how well our staff has done in it. “There’s not much chance you can go full out in this heat but we’ve got everything done, including a few of our other projects,” he said. And Segsworth expects the traffic lights to be working at the Harrowsmith intersection as well, however, he cautioned that they will take some adjusting. “It is going to take a while to get the timing right on the lights,” he said. “There will be some adjustments to be made according to traffic density, rush hour, etc. “We’re not going to get that right right off the bat.” Johnston’s PointCoun. Ross Sutherland’s attempt to get Johnston Point Condominium project back on the table has failed. Sutherland argued that Bylaw 2018-34 passed at the June 5 Council meeting should be reconsidered on the grounds that the developer has yet to sign the condominium agreement. “We passed that bylaw on the assumption that the Township would be able to go in and investigate complaints such as tree cutting and blasting,” Sutherland said. “But we can’t do that until the developer signs the agreement. “And there has been a complaint subsequent to our passing the bylaw.” His Council colleagues disagreed however. Bringing the bylaw back to the table for debate required a two-thirds majority vote of Council (ie six votes). The motion was defeated 7-1 with Sutherland being the lone ‘yes’ vote. Stone Buildings capture Heritage Commitee’s attentionA report from the Heritage Committee suggesting future plans with respect to heritage buildings led Deputy Mayor Alan Revill to wonder aloud “are we changing the focus of the committee, which up to this point has been rather passive?” “The committee has been revising its priorities by looking at buildings of interest,” said CAO Wayne Orr. “But it’s still functioning within its terms of reference.” Of note has been David Jefferies’ Stone House Heritage Route Project but Coun. Ross Sutherland suggested there were “some really fascinating wood structures still intact like Fermoy Hall.” “The committee has had discussions on that but decided the stone buildings would be a good starting point,” said Orr. “The stone buildings do catch the eye,” said Coun. Pat Barr, who is on the committee. “If we do get this registry of fascinating buildings nobody knows about completed, we could start tours for events like the ATV rally,” said Mayor Ron Vandewal. “It’s a step in the right direction.” Phone company to expand fibre networkCouncil voted to enter into an agreement with North Frontenac Telephone Company for the installation of fibre optic cable for high-speed internet connection along the length of the K & P Trail from Tichborne to Orser Road. Council agreed to the waving of $1,750 in license of occupation fees. High mark for building permitsIn the second quarter of 2018, $13,050,191 worth of building permits were issued in the township, the first time in the last four years that over $13 million in permits were issued in one quarter. For the first six months of 2018, over $16 million in permits have been issued, up from just under $15 million in 2017, $14 million in 2016, and $10 million in 2015. Overall the value of permits has been trending upwards over the last 4 years, as annual values have risen from $27 million to $32 million in the three year period between 2015 and 2017 and it appears that will only go up this year The number of permits for new homes in the first half of the years is 31, 26 permanent dwellings and 5 seasonal dwellings.

Ken Garret Park needs your bottles

The Inverary Youth Activities Group, which runs Ken Garrett Park in Inverary, has run into an unexpected financial snag this year, and is hoping to cover a shortfall through a fundraising drive. Registration fees, earnings from the canteen, and sponsorship revenue usually cover the annual maintenance costs to run the park. But there are a number of one time capital costs that have come up this year, including the need for a new fridge, fencing costs, repair of field nets and new foul ball nets. But the largest costs was for a replacement mowing machine. “With ten acres to maintain, and a mower that could no longer be counted on, we had to look for a new one. We got a good deal on one, but it still has created a shortfall,” said Judy Borovski, of the committee. The park is seeking the public support to help cover the shortfall. So, during ball tournaments at the park on August 18 and 25, there will be a bottle drive. Members of the public are invited to bring beer, wine, and liquor bottles and cans to the canteen, where volunteers will be on hand to collect them. Proceeds from returning the containers to the Beer Store for rebate will all be donated to Youth Activities Group. For those who are unable to attend the tournaments, there is a trailer set up for bottle and can drop off, at 3950 Round Lake Road. It will stay up until the end of August. Organizers of the drive are hoping to be able to make and announcement about further sponsorship which could make donations of bottles more beneficial to the local community who have supported the park over the years. “For now, all we can say is every little bit helps,” said Borovski.

FRONTENAC COUNTY NEWS

T & A’s Condiment Company

T & A’s Condiment Company

Tracey Jarvis-Craig loves hot sauces. Not only does she use hot sauce on just about everything, from breakfast to dinner, and likely on late night snacks as well, she likes to use different sauces with different dishes. That interest started her on a quest to make her own hot sau...

A few changes as nominations close in municipal campaign

This is the final version of an article originally written on July 24, reflecting the status as of the close of nominations on July 27 Phil Archambault, an Inverary resident who ran for the Liberal Party in the 2016 Federal election, finishing second to long time Conservative MP Scott Reid, is making the move to municipal politics. “I think it is time for a change,” Archambault said moments after submitting his nomination papers on Tuesday afternoon (July 23) There are now three candidates for Mayor of South Frontenac, incumbent Ron Vandewal, and current Loughborough Councilor Mark Schjerning. In other locations,there is less of a contest. In Addington Highlands (AH), there is  a single contested position, that of Reeve. Alice Madigan has jumped into the race this week, preenting long term incumbent Henry Hogg from being acclaimed to the position once again. There are two candidates for two positions in both ward 1 (Kirby Thompson and Royce Rosenblath) and ward 2 (Bill Cox and Helen Yanch),  and a single candidate for all of the relevant school board councils in the towsnhip In neighbouring North Frontenac, the only contested position as of early this week was one of the ward 3 (Palmerston-Canonoto) spots, but then incumbent Denis Bedard withdrew. If the nominiations are ratified next week, the new council will be same as the old one, except Fred Fowler will be one of the Palmerston Canonto councillors in place of Bedard, In Central Frontenac there will be a contest in ward 4 (Hinchinbrooke) as incumbents Brent Cameron and Philip Smith are being challenged by Niki Gowdy.  There are also contests In ward 2 (Olden)  where Victor Heese, Elwyn Burke, Dan Cunningham, and Bill Everett are all running. In ward 3 (Kennebec) Tom Dewey, Cindy Kelsey and newcomer Isaac Hale are running. Elsewhere in Central, no one is challenging Mayor Frances Smith thus far, and in ward 3 (Oso) incumbents Bill MacDonald and Sherry Whan are the only ones running. In South Frontenac, aside from the race for Mayor, in both Storrington and Bedford wards acclamations are looking pretty likely at this point. The incumbents, Alan Revill and Pat Barr (Bedford) and Norm Roberts and Ron Sleeth (Storrington), may see themselves declared elected next week.  The other two South Frontenac Districts are being contested, however. In Loughborough incumbent Ross Sutherland is running again, as are Fran Willes, Randy Ruttan and Farrah Soaft. And there is a crowded field in Portland District, which is essentially an open contest. Brad Barbeau, who finished third in 2014 but was appointed to council when Bill Robinson died, is running again. Four others, (Ray Leonard, Doug Morey, Bruno Albani, and Tom Bruce) are also seeking election. Incumbant Councilor John McDougall is not running. There are also numerous trustee races taking place.. Our readers in the Maberly area of Tay Valley Township will be inundated with electioneering in comparison to everyone else. There are three candidates for Reeve, incumbent Kieth Kerr, Susan Freeman, and Brian Campbell , two candidates for the Deputy Reeve position, Barry Crampton and Judy Farrell, and three candidates for the two South Sherbrooke ward position, incumbents Mark Burnham and Roxanne Darling as well as Rob Rainer.    

County looking to assume downloaded roads in order to obtain more grant money

It might seem like an elaborate sleight of hand manoeuvre, but Frontenac County Chief Administrative Officer Kelly Pender is asking members of Frontenac County Council to consider setting up a county roads system, on paper only. And the payoff could be some heavy virtual paper money, as much as $5.7 million in grant money, every second year. Over time, the Federal and Provincial governments have developed different funding programs aimed at helping cash strapped municipalities pay for expensive infrastructure maintenance and upgrades on roads, bridges and other assets. The source of funding that has been available for this for the last 10 years is the Federal Gas Tax program, which provides $840,000 each year that is split among the townships on the basis of the amount of property assessment they each have, with another $840,000 going to Frontenac County. Since all the roads and bridges in Frontenac County are owned by the local township, for the past 5 years the counties’ $840,000 has been transferred to the townships “The County has been informed that, starting next year, the federal gas tax program will bring less money to Frontenac,” said Kelly Pender. “It will be tied to population and since population growth in Ontario is under the national average and rural Ontario population growth is lower still, we project a decrease in our funding.” A new program, the Ontario Community Infrastructure Fund, (OCIF) is now on stream as well. It is split between upper tier (County Level) and Lower Tier (Township level) funding in a similar way as the gas tax is. However it differs in two significant ways. While the gas tax can be used for a more broad range of infrastructure purposes, including trails, the OCIF is more narrow. It can only be used for roads, bridges, water and wastewater projects. The second difference is that only jurisdictions which are in possession of these kinds of assets can apply for the funds. That’s where the need for a Frontenac County virtual roads department comes in. “In order for Frontenac County to be eligible for OCIF funding, we need to have ownership of eligible infrastructure assets,” said Pender. The easiest way for Frontenac County to do this would be to assume arterial roads from the townships, and the contract back the maintenance on them to the township roads departments. That way nothing changes on the ground or in staffing at the roads departments, but extra money would come to the county to cover major repairs and upgrades to those roads every two years. In order for this to happen, Pender is presenting a path forward to Frontenac County Council this week. His proposal is to explore setting up a virtual roads system and report back in January to the new council, which takes office after the upcoming municipal election. The most likely scenario would be for the county to assume the former provincially owned roads that were downloaded in 1998 (Road 38, Perth Road, Road 506/509, Road 96 on Wolfe Island, and Road 22 on Howe Island) The Public Works Managers from all four townships meet with each other regularly to foster communication and co-operation and if the road plan goes through the managers group will take on a more decisive role. Another part of the proposal would be for the townships to re-flow some of the federal gas tax money back to the county to help fund county-wide initiatives that gas tax money can be used for but OCIF money cannot be used for. These initiatives, including trails and investments in plugging gaps in cell coverage, are already in the county spending plans and will need to financed through direct taxation of borrowing otherwise, according to Pender. The proposal provides for an option for each township to opt in or out of the virtual roads system, and can only go forward if at least two townships opt in. It also carries a guarantee that the benefit of OCIF funding to the local townships will be greater than any loss of gas tax funds. (The meeting where this matter is being raised takes place on Wednesday, July 18 and council’s decision will be posted on Frontenacnews.ca) OCIF, which is also based on federal and provincial funds, is a $100 million fund, and is slated to grow to $300 million, although that will need to be confirmed as the result of the recent change in government in Ontario. If the fund remains at $100 million, Pender projects it will be worth about $950,000 per year to Frontenac County, and that figure would triple to $2.85 million per year if the new Ontario follows through with an increased commitment to bring the fund to $300 million per year after 3 years.

Local green energy co-op faces new Ford reality

Until late last week, The Wintergreen Energy Co-op (WGC) had thirteen 250 kilowatt solar energy projects ready to proceed in South and Central Frontenac and rural Kingston under the Feed-in-Tariff (5) program. Not anymore. The WGC projects are among the 758 green energy projects that were cancelled this week by the new Ontario government. WGC President David Hahn said on Tuesday that the solar projects had been waiting for the final go ahead from Ontario’s Independent Electricity Service Operator (IESO), which was to come in the form a Notice to Proceed (NTP). “My understanding is that all of the projects waiting for the NTP have been cancelled,” he said when contacted at his farm on Canoe Lake Road, “which would include our projects”. Hahn said that Wintergreen itself was not facing a large financial loss as the result of the cancellations. “We invested time and effort in it, and some money, but the way these work we don’t take ownership until the project is up and running. Our partner, SolarShare, and the contractor we work with, Soventix, as well as the landowners who will not be getting any benefit from the land leases, are all out of pocket for all the work and costs associated with getting approvals and arranging for the tie-in to the grid. They are all worse off than the co-op itself from these cancellations.” Hahn said that projects were all set to create jobs locally and regionally, but “that is all gone by the wayside now. For the WGC, the future is unclear as until now they had been promoting community based renewable projects under the soon to be scrapped Green Energy Act, but Hahn thinks it will continue to have a role to play. “We will discuss this at our Annual General Meeting in the Fall, but I am hopeful that net metering projects will still be viable, and maybe we can do some of those on a community basis. Net metering refers to small scale projects that feed energy back into the electricity grid, lowering or eliminating hydro charges to the customer who produces the power, “If we can pool groups of homeowners to feed energy back into the system, hopefully that will still be something that will be acceptable to the new government,” he said. The Wintergreen Energy Co-op was set up in 2012 to promote community based green energy projects in Kingston Frontenac and Lennox and Addington. “We envision a region where our energy needs are met through renewable and clean energy technologies. Community ownership and participation provide the foundation for all Wintergreen Energy Co-op projects” is how its mission is described on its website.

Working with landlords to prevent homelessness

Landlords in Frontenac County are encouraged to connect with Amanda Pantrey, new Rural Housing Liaison Worker, to find out about the incentives and perks that come with working with the rural Housing and Homelessness Collaborative Team, based out of Southern Frontenac Community Services in Sydenham. The Housing and Homelessness program in the County of Frontenac aims to serve high-needs, low-income families in need of assistance to secure and maintain safe, appropriate, and affordable housing. Landlords are a key partner in the success of the program, and in return for working with the Collaborative Team, landlords gain access to supports and incentives. “There are benefits for rural landlords to work with the Collaborative Team,” says Pantrey. “First, landlords will have an advantage because their units will be entered into our database, which our staff can use to successfully match clients with appropriate properties. As well, landlords can be confident knowing eligible tenants can access on-going support, such as funding to help them get and stay on their feet, or to cover unexpected costs such as utilities arrears.” “Landlords working with our team are also included in our information-sharing networks and will get insight to incentive programs, such as Kingston-Frontenac Renovates Program – Accessibility Enhancement Program.” Pantrey adds, “This program is exciting. Landlords could be eligible for a forgivable loan up to $20,000 to assist in accessibility upgrades. The deadline for that program is August 31, so landlords are encouraged to call me as soon as possible to get started.” Southern Frontenac Community Services is one of three agencies working together in the Housing and Homelessness Collaborative that serves the County of Frontenac, administered by the City of Kingston’s 10-year Municipal Housing and Homelessness Plan. Rural Frontenac Community Services and Addiction Mental Health Services, KFL&A make up the rest of team. “Homelessness and housing insecurity in Frontenac County is very real,” says SFCSC Executive Director, David Townsend. “The demand for services keeps growing. Building relationships with local landlords will not only benefit our clients, but the community as a whole. When families who want to live here are able to stay, everybody wins.” For more information on the Housing and Homelessness Program in the County of Frontenac, and how we can help you, call Amanda Pantrey, at SFCSC, at 613-376-6477 ext. 208.

ADDINGTON HIGHLANDS NEWS

Merritta Parks marks 100 years!

Merritta Parks marks 100 years!

On August 1, Pine Meadow celebrated a very special birthday. This day marked 100 years of age for this very remarkable woman. “It was quite a busy party they had for me at the Lion’s Centre [in Northbrook]. There were people coming and going all afternoon,” she...

Cloyne art show been helping students for 46 years

The Cloyne Showcase Art & Craft Sale just turned 46, and although the number of exhibitors was down slightly this year, most of the exhibitors reported they were doing just fine, boding well for the future of the show. “I’ve been coming here consistently for 14 years and it’s always been reasonably good,” said woodcrafter Ken Waller. “People have been coming up to me saying ‘I bought a bowl from you years ago.’ “I tell them, ‘good, you probably need another one now.’” The show, which has always been a fundraiser for the North Addington Education Centre to secure art supplies for its students, continues that tradition. “It’s also a way for students to show off their works,” said organizer/art teacher Katie Ohlke. “The students have two tables here.” It’s always been that way, said Eileen Flieler, who taught at the school for 20 years and was involved in the first show. “This started as a way to display works of students,” she said. “I was involved in that first one and I helped out with the posters. “I was also in the show for several years with teddy bears and crib cults. “I still put up posters — all the way from Myer’s Cave to Arden.” And then there’s Marion Young, who at 89 still displays her hooked rugs and wall hangings. She proudly displays a patch that proclaims “Love Those Hookers.” “In those early days, you knew everybody and you had to be a local taxpayer to get a table,” she said. “Then about 12-15 years ago, they opened it up for everybody.” Gwynneth, who has been painting oils in an impasto technique (“I have 50 palette knives”) has returned to the show after a long sabbatical. “I used to be here from ’76 to ’83,” she said. “Last year was the first one back since ’83.” And then there’s Bill Vanwart. Despite painting for 40 years, teaching art for 30 years (of which five were spent at NAEC), this was not only his first time at this show, it was his first show, period. “Yeah, I taught here, Odessa, Napanee, even Northern Manitoba,” he said. “I sometimes wonder how things would have been if I’d lived in Toronto or Montreal.” That’s a good question. Vanwart is one of those rare finds you sometimes see at the various art/craft shows and you wonder where he’s been hiding all these years. His acrylic technique shows a gift for rendering, be it people, landscape or animals (he had an excellent moose on display). One series features various characters playing hockey on frozen ponds. “I’m interested in the ice,” he said. But what made Vanwart stand out was his series of surrealistic dancers, flights of fancy that bring to mind Chagall or Dali. “I started doing those in university sketchbooks,” he said. “It only takes about a day to paint one once I finally got around to doing it.” Serious art collectors might want to make a note of Bill Vanwart.

Land O’Lakes Traditional Music Hall of Fame adds eight to its roster

It was a hot day Saturday as the Land O’Lakes Traditional Music Hall of Fame inducted its class of 2018. The class included country crooners Water Cameron, Albert St. Pierre, Ralph (Curley) Taylor, bass player Doreen Black, drummer Ernie Smith, fiddler Neil Perry (posthumously), and Dean Northey (posthumously). Multi-instrumentalist/singer Howard Northey was recognized with the Lifetime Achievement Award. After MC Joe Saunders’ welcome, the Rev. Jean Brown asked for a moment of silence to honour the late Murry Northey, Red Paquin and Boyd (Buck) Warren. First up was Flinton’s own Doreen Black, who performed with the house band. “I’d like to thank my family and friends for voting for me,” she said. “And for standing by me.” Black was a long-time member of the Country Four. Next was Walter Cameron, who also did a number. “Many times, he played at the old Parrish Hall in Plevna,” said presenter Bill White. “He also played with the Country Gentlemen and played for the Governor General.” Not to be upstaged, Sharbot Lake’s Albert St. Pierre played a tune along with his wife, Patty. His induction prompted Central Frontenac Mayor Frances Smith to say a few words. “You’re the first one we’ve ever done for our Township,” she said. “Thanks for 50 years of rocking the country.” Next was a tribute to the late Dean Northey, whom everyone credited with being a driving force towards bringing bluegrass to the area, including large concerts held on the Cataraqui River in Kingston featuring names like Bill Munroe and Clinch Mountain. The band played St. Anne’s Reel in his honour. This was followed by a tribute to inductee Curley Taylor. Taylor couldn’t attend for health reasons, but Centre Hastings Mayor Tom Deline said after he left Flinton he was heading right to Taylor’s house in Madoc. “He promised he’d have a beer waiting for me,” Deline said. Next, Joe Saunders played Silver Haired Daddy of Mine in tribute to inductee Ernie Smith. Then there was an explanation of the Lifetime Achievement Award given to octogenarian Howard Northey as well as a tribute sone. This was followed by Sid Prescott playing the fiddle tune Cragrock Pass to honour inductee Neil Perry as well as presentations to the Perry family.

Limestone joins with other boards calling for sex-ed curriculum to be reinstated

Last Friday, (July 27) the Limestone District School Board joined with other boards in Ontario who are urging the new Ford government to reconsider its decision to pull the health and physical education curriculum that was instituted in 2015 from Ontario schools. In a letter to Minister of Education, Lisa Thompson, , Board Chair Paula Murray and Director of Education Debra Rantz ask for clarity around recent direction to revert to the what they called an “antiquated 1998 curriculum which does not support today’s students or families.” The Board is asking the Ministry to “maintain the 2015 documents so educators may continue to support our students on important topics such as gay marriage, gender identity, sexting and sexual consent.” In their letter, Murray and Rantz referred to the Ontario Equity Action Plan (2017) to illustrate the role that the curriculum plays in the healthy development of the students in the Kingston, Frontenac and Lennox and Addington region who attend Limestone schools. The Act says that the “the success of our graduates necessitates building their confidence in who they are and their resilience in the face of adversity and ensuring they feel accepted and included … Students must also experience teaching and learning that is reflective of their needs and of who they are.” In the Limestone context, the letter says “in Limestone, we know firsthand the importance of this work. We know that our students must see themselves reflected in our curriculum, in our buildings, in our culture, to feel safe and supported, and to ensure their well-being. Our staff has used this curriculum to help empower our students to reach their full potential while supporting their emotional, mental and physical needs. Reverting to an outdated curriculum flies in the face of this progressive work and the Board does not support such a move.” Within the City of Kingston there was a 53% increase in reports of sexual assault in 2017. Rantz and Murray say the increase may by in part due to the #MeToo movement giving confidence and support to Kingston residents to come forward. “Our students need to learn about the concept of consent and the vocabulary of body parts so that they can speak clearly to police, and we can all work together as a community to prevent sexual abuse and ensure the safety and well-being of all of our students. This partnership is well supported by dedicated and experienced educators who have been professionally trained on how to respond and support students in need,” they wrote. Finally, they referred to the “three pillars of Wellness, Innovation, and Collaboration” that the board adopted as core priorities several years ago. “We are fiercely committed to those priorities, which include inclusion and equity for all,” they wrote, saying that the 2015 Health and Phys Ed curriculum plays a significant role in making the “board responsive to our students’ needs and ensuring they have the learning opportunities they deserve in 2018. “We want everyone to see themselves in Limestone and this curriculum is key to helping achieve that goal.” As of Tuesday (July 31) 20 Ontario Boards have sent similar letters to the Minister, including the Toronto District School Board, Durham District School Board, Kawartha Pine Ridge, Thames Valley, Ottawa Carleton, Simcoe County and Lambton Kent. Opponents of the change in curriculum point out that the old curriculum, which is slated to be re-instituted this year, had been in place since 1998, when the impact of the Internet and Social Media on students was not yet a factor. For her part, Minister Thompson referred only to the recent past in defending the old curriculum. “Teachers are going to be going back to what they taught in 2014, and they’re familiar with that curriculum,” she told the Toronto Star

Government programs support private land conservation

The Land Conservancy for Kingston Frontenac Lennox and Addington wants landowners in the region to think about two things that aren’t normally thought of at the same time, Canadian tax law and the beauty and diversity of their rural property. Landowners would like to see the wild lands that they have enjoyed over the years to continue to be a place for nature and are looking for reassurance their land will not be clear cut or subdivided for cottages, are also concerned about the future tax burden on their families. That’s where the Land Conservancy comes in. An information session is set for the Piccadilly Hall in Godfrey on Sunday, July 29th at 9:30am. “Through an Ontario Trillium Foundation Grant and the Ontario Land Trust Alliance, we have been able to assemble a team of specialists who can provide information about Canadian and American tax laws. These sessions are for both Canadians and Americans who own land with conservation value in Ontario,” explains Vicki Schmolka, president of the Land Conservancy for Kingston, Frontenac, Lennox and Addington. There are options for landowners to consider if they want to work with the Land Conservancy. Lands can be donated, and a charitable receipt for the market value of the property can be provided. The land can also be partially donated and partially sold to the Conservancy. Lands that are transferred can also include the right for the landowner to continued to use the property for a period of time. This enables them to continue to enjoy the property for a number of years without paying annual property tax. “Both the Ontario and federal governments have several programs that provide incentives for private land owners to conserve the natural values of their land – the Ecological Gifts program, sections of the Income Tax Act, split-receipting, conservation easements. There are many ways for landowners to contribute to land conservation and protect the land they love. This may ensure their land can stay in the family as a place for nature,” said Schmolka.“The governments have signed on to an international agreement to protect 17% of land for conservation. Ontario is only at 11% now so there is some way to go to meet the agreement commitments,” she added, “The incentives that will be explained at the workshops can help the province and the country reach their conservation goals.” A tax expert from Grant Thornton will be on hand at the meeting, and there will be special information of Americans who own land in Canada. The Land Conservancy’s “We need nature” booklet and the Ontario Land Trust Alliance’s handbook with tax scenarios for American landowners will be available at the meetings.For more information about the Sunday information session, contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. The session is free. About KFL&A Conservancy Lands The Conservancy protects 8 properties, a total land holding of 212 hectares in Frontenac and L&A. Those properties include the Meyer Woods and Arthur Nature Reserve properties, the Lee Nature Reserve on the Salmon River, and the Depot Creek Nature Reserve (formerly owned by Kim Ondaatje) near Bellrock, which is accessible to the public. For information on the Depot Creek Reserve, go to landconservancykfla.org/visiting-depot-creek-nature-reserve. The Conservancy also holds conservation easements on two properties, totalling 85 hectares and 990 metres of shoreline, one near Westport and the other on the Salmon River.

EDITORIALS

  • There will be another Option for Brian, if he wants one
    Brian Lipsin is surprised by the outpouring of community support after his record store was flooded last Saturday, ruining much of his stock of records, cd’s, tapes and posters. No one else is. Lipsin, who lives on a farm property near Harrowsmith, has been Brian of Brian’s Record Option to…
    Written on Wednesday, 08 August 2018 10:30 in Editorials
  • Programming, the rural challenge and the Basic Income Guarantee
    I’m a programmer. I love the challenge, and I especially love how a few lines of code can save hours of monotonous labour. So much human potential is wasted carrying out mind-numbing tasks, and it’s my hope that one day technology will free us up to focus on the things…
    Written on Wednesday, 08 August 2018 10:30 in Editorials
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LETTERS

  • Re- parking in Sharbot Lake.
    On a recent return to my hometown, Sharbot Lake, I was struck by the traffic in what I used to refer to as "uptown." Cars lined both sides of the street from the old Catholic Church to the top of the hill on Elizabeth Street. Upon commenting to a friend…
    Written on Wednesday, 08 August 2018 10:28 in Letters
  • Sharbot Lake - 2038
    Perhaps surprisingly, we have over 120 business within 10 km. of our village. Over the past decade, we have seen businesses essential to Sharbot Lake’s life and well-being change hands and grow. Examples are numerous: The Crossing, Mike Dean’s Superfood Store, Seeds Accounting, Robinson’s Asset Management, Pharmacare, Gray’s Grocery &…
    Written on Wednesday, 25 July 2018 13:26 in Letters
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