Featured News

Addington Highlands to Consult the Public Over Cannabis

Addington Highlands to Consult the Public Over Cannabis

Among local councils, Addington Highlands has been the most pro-active over cannabis regulations. This is, at least in part, because the township was notified by residents several months ago that two...

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Holiday Market packs PCPS on a rather snowy day in December

Holiday Market packs PCPS on a rather snowy day in December

Outside, there were huge snowflakes falling and cars were parked all along Road 38. Inside Prince Charles Public School, there was the hustle and bustle of the 13th annual Holiday Market, a cooperativ...

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Ruttan to chair Limestone Board of Trustees in 2019.

Ruttan to chair Limestone Board of Trustees in 2019.

Suzanne Ruttan has been the South Frontenac Township trustee to the Limestone District School Board since 2010. She has served as the Board Vice Chair for the past three years, and when the new Board ...

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Central Frontenac Council – December 11

Central Frontenac Council – December 11

Central Frontenac Council passed a bylaw allowing for the installation of a stop sign on Cross Road at Armstrong Road at its regular meeting Tuesday in Oso Hall. Acting Public Works Manager David Arm...

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Small Business Expo “brings entrepreneurs together”

Small Business Expo “brings entrepreneurs together”

To a certain extent, last Friday’s Small Business Expo ’18 at the St. Lawrence College Employment Service in Sharbot Lake was a vendors’ market. Many of the local usual suspects were...

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Sutherland challenges closed meeting procedure

South Frontenac Council began their COW meeting an hour early, in order to hold a closed Session pri...

Tips for Air Travel Entertaining and Informative Seminar at The Centre

“You would not believe some of the things we get asked,” travel consultant Carrie Borer ...

Performing for Seniors Nourishes This Singer’s Soul

Mark McDonell loves his job. In a coffee shop earlier in November, the talented father of two talks...

Rotary Cash Calendar

Local Rotary Clubs from Kingston, Napanee and Frontenac are selling the 2019 Rotary Cash Calendars t...

Frontenac County’s Best Landlord Award –$200 prizes at stake

Frontenac County’s Best Landlord Award seeks to champion landlords who strive to break convent...

Frontenac Rentals – taking advantage of the growing accommodation market

Allan Zahara has been living on 14 Island Lake for a number of years, and for most of that time he h...

Jennie Cousineau has one hundred years of memories

Edna Webb was quite young when she gave birth to Jennie, her first child, at home on Little Franklin...

Inaugural SF council meeting

Deputy fire chief says he's being pushed outBill Babcock, Deputy Fire Chief in Portland, addressed C...

Metis Rendezvous

Mr. Flegal’s grade three/four class at Granite Ridge Education Centre class was honoured to ha...

Riverhill Christmas Lights up to the 100,000 light mark

A few years ago, Greg Ducharme started putting up Christmas lights one his Riverhill Farms house. Hi...

NORTH FRONTENAC NEWS

Riverhill Christmas Lights up to the 100,000 light mark

Riverhill Christmas Lights up to the 100,000 light mark

A few years ago, Greg Ducharme started putting up Christmas lights one his Riverhill Farms house. His spread, at 1311 Struthadam Road, is just a short jaunt down the River Road South of Ompah (or north of the Ardoch Road). “After awhile, we’d be sitting watching TV a...

North Frontenac looking at unique family development on Kashwakamak

Despite a rather lengthy agenda that included a public meeting on a unique proposal for a family recreational complex on Kashwakamak Lake, an afternoon information session/open house on the new Zoning Bylaw and recognition of long-serving employees, there wasn’t much actual business done at North Frontenac’s last regular Council meeting before the new Council takes over in December. The proposed development on Kashwakamak prompted county Manager of Community Planning Megan Rueckwald to comment: “this is quite site specific. “The Zoning Bylaw is not going to service every single property in North Frontenac.” Rueckwald said they have received “a number” of letters and emails on the proposal. “I know the Kash Association is against four or five families there because of potential congestion,” said Coun. Gerry Martin. “We didn’t even inform the lake association.” “We have no requirement to tell the lake associations,” said Mayor Ron Higgins. “It was advertised in the paper.” The proposal is unique in that Debbie Rucker owns 101 acres on two lots. There are four grown children who would like to create a family lodge along with parents and small children, 11 family members in total. Writing in the proposal for the family, Debbie Rucker said: “The property was initially purchased with the intention of eventually giving ownership to the current owners’ four adult children. “Its purpose was to be a place where the family can come together, and the owners’ grandchildren have a place to grow up exploring and making memories.” There was a pre-existing trailer on the property when purchased and they have also used two additional trailers and tents. If approved, the plan would include four sleep cabins of varying designs, an outdoor kitchen, bathroom and shower facilities, fresh and grey water, a power/storage shed, a water tower, a garage and a main dwelling. “Our next planning report will address the comments we’ve received,” said Rueckwald. “Today, we’re just getting information,” said CAO Cheryl Robson. “We’re still receiving public input.” “I guess I’m concerned about precedent here,” said Coun. John Inglis. “What prevents anybody from doing whatever they want?” Recycling BluesMayor Ron Higgins expressed concern that the amount of recyclables were going down. “A lot of it is around plastic,” said Public Works Manager Darwyn Sproule. “There’s a shift in what packaging producers are sending us.” “A lot of things are changing in the market so we’ll be bringing a report soon,” said CAO Cheryl Robson. “Toronto is to be barred from shipping its waste to the U.S.,” said Coun. John Inglis. “They’ll be turning their eyes eastward,” said Coun. Gerry Martin. “We have the most capacity in the Frontenacs,” said Robson. “And China isn’t taking as much plastic as they used to,” said Coun. Vernon Hermer.

Thomson, music and the very nature of being Canadian comes together in The Algonquin Ensemble

Musicians finding inspiration from the visual arts is not new. Don McLean’s Vincent (Starry, Starry Night) comes to mind. Hokusai’s The Great Wave is said to be the inspiration for Claude Debussy’s La Mer. But it is rare for a Canadian painter to function as someone’s muse. It’s also rare for the visual art to project as complex as The Algonquin Ensemble. The Algonquin Ensemble is North Frontenac’s own Terry Tufts (guitars) and Kathryn Briggs (piano) along with friends John Geggie (double bass), Lisa Moody (viola), Laura Nerenberg (violin) and Margaret Maria (cello). The visual artist in this case is Tom Thomson. Thomson, the quintessential Canadian artist, while never officially a member of the Group of Seven, was instrumental in their association and arguably responsible for the emergence of Canadian landscape painting as a recognizable genre on its own. He died a mysterious death in his beloved Algonquin Park 101 years ago. For Tufts, who spent much of his high school years in the back of the room sketching guitars, Thomson was indeed a catalyst, but the whole project was actually kick-started by luthier/guitar maker Linda Manzer (who has made guitars for Bruce Cockburn and Carlos Santana). She also made Tufts’ one-of-a-kind instrument, a 50-string part-guitar-part-cittern-three-part-harp that otherwise defies description, known as Manzer’s Palette. “We were looking at Thomson’s work (around the 100th anniversary of his death) with Linda,” said Briggs. “She’s a Thomson freak too and she said ‘I know you could do something with this.’” That chance statement led to some informal exploration. “Kathryn has her piano in our main room,” said Tufts. “I have instruments on every wall. “We’d often get up at night and jam.” “Terry became obsessed,” Briggs said. “I was ready to kill him when he was up at 2 a.m. playing the piano. “Then I smelt pipe tobacco.” Neither of them smokes a pipe. “That was an auspicious start,” she said. “All sorts of synchronous things started happening. “I’d often put a book of Thomson paintings on my piano. “That was my music.” “And there were a lot of gallery visits,” said Tufts. From there Manzer got in touch with bass player Geggie, whom Tufts and Briggs have worked with before. “Almost as soon as Linda met with him, John was enthusiastic,” Briggs said. “And he was well-connected. “He knew string players who would be amenable to playing folk.” The next thing you know, the had a multi-media, three-screen presentation, which they performed at the McMichael Gallery commemorating the 100th anniversary of Thomson’s death, and a CD, Sonic Palette (available through BandCamp). “This has struck a chord with people our age (60+),” said Tufts. “We’ve done five shows with this and standing ovations every show,” said Briggs. “And every show someone comes up to us in tears. “Part of it is probably our connection with wild spaces.” “Also, there’s the story (of Thomson’s death) but we don’t like to focus too much on that,” said Tufts. “Still, we are hard pressed to come up with Canadian stories. “The 150th celebrations were not as ‘yippee’ as 1967. “When you think about the things humanity’s doing to the planet and what was done to our indigenous population . . .” But this too is part of it all. It’s really an exploration of things Canadian, or at the very least, this part of Canada. It started more than 100 years ago, when Thomson started changing the way we looked at this land of ours, through a visual interpretation that resulted in The West Wind, The Jack Pine and Northern River. In a way, it’s almost surprising nobody made the connection to translate the feelings Thomson’s painting into music before. “There are so many things going on in the paintings,” Tufts said. “There are descants running all through them. “Where we live, all those colours Thomson painted, they’re all right there in the snow.” They are indeed. And now, we have those colours in the synesthesia of music.

North Frontenac unravelling history — “one tombstone at a time”

The Clar-Mill Community Archives’ latest project is cataloguing North Frontenac’s cemeteries and as such coordinator Brenda Martin was at North Frontenac’s regular Council meeting last Friday in Plevna to outline how they plan to go about it. “One of the first mysteries to unravel will be the determination of the oldest cemetery in North Frontenac,” Martin said. “Until a recent find, Playfair Cemetery was recorded as the oldest. “Perhaps it is the oldest ‘registered’ cemetery.” Watkins Cemetery (Lot 20 NER, Clarendon) on private land was recently identified and markers and historical writings would place this as the oldest cemetery in the Township with graves dating to 1862 when Bramwell Watkins had Pierpont dig a grave for his brother, Delany, who drowned in Fawn Lake on Sept. 21, 1860. Currently, there are 13 cemeteries recognized in North Frontenac including (Ardoch) Plevna Community Cemetery, Ardoch United Church Cemetery, Cloyne Pioneer Cemetery, Dempsey Cemetery, Donaldson (Mundell) Cemetery, Grindstone (Playfair) Cemetery, Harlowe United Church Cemetery, Ompah Cemetery, Robertsville Cemetery, Sproule Family Burial, St. John’s Anglican Cemetery, St. Killian’s Catholic Cemetery and St. Mark’s Anglican (Harlowe). “We’re looking for input (from Council) as to what to do next,” Martin said. “We want a summer student, and we have people who are willing to help. “But there’s an inconsistent numbering system and improvements needed to the website link.” She said there’s been a drone survey of the Robertsville Cemetery done as a pilot project and they’d like to explore doing more of that. “But we need a Township letter of support for our grant application and after that our biggest issue would be summer students and office space for them to work in.” “Right now we’ve got a lot of old tombstones that lawnmowers are running over,” said Coun. Gerry Martin. “And some of those old Ardoch tombstones date back to the 1880s. “We need to look at getting them fixed.” “I think this is an extremely worthwhile project,” said Coun. Vernon Hermer. As per the Township procedural bylaw, the allocation of funds and resources was deferred until the nex regular meeting.   • • • Council voted to commission a $7,200 engineering study for accessible washrooms at the Snow Road Hall. But it wasn’t a unanimous decision. Mayor Ron Higgins cast the deciding vote (there were only five Council members in attendance) agreeing with Dep. Mayor Fred Perry and Coun. Gerry Martin. Coun. Vernon Hermer and John Inglis voted against. “I’d like to go on record as protesting against this,” said Inglis. “I don’t understand why you have to hire an engineering firm to wire a bathroom.” “I agree with you,” said manager of community development Corey Klatt. “It’s over the top. “But it’s required because of the (accessibility) rennovation.”   • • • Mayor Ron Higgins gave notice that he’d like to review the firearms bylaw next meeting. “We got complaints from a couple of residents,” he said. “People are hunting too close to homes.” “The squirrels are going to be happy if I can’t shoot any more of them,” said Coun. Gerry Martin.   • • • Coun. John Inglis gave notice of motion to discuss options for reducing the speed of heavy trucks and cars through Ompah. “Apparently there are large trucks coming through at 4:30 a.m. and we got complaints from a couple of residents,” he said.

North Frontenac looking at $350,000 in building repairs

In North Frontenac, there are a few (public) buildings that don’t meet code, Brian MacDonald of McIntosh Perry, told Council at its regular meeting last week in Plevna. CAO Cheryl Robson said McIntosh Perry was contracted to do the Township’s first ever facilities assessment after a successful grant application for just this purpose. “I’ve been around eight years and this is the first time I’ve seen anything like this,” said Coun. Gerry Martin. MacDonald said they looked at 20 municipal facilities with an estimated total replacement value of about $10,000,000, including four fire halls and six public works facilities. While the ‘portfolio’ is currently in generally good condition, if no work were to be done on them in the next 10 years, the portfolio would be in generally “poor” condition, he said. “Approximately $2,171,000 would be required to maintain the facilities in a ‘state of good repair,’” he said. Of the 20 facilities, short term repairs and replacements of about $350,000 would be required on five of them. The Harlowe Community Hall needs $70,000 to repair basement leakage. The Snow Road Fire Hall needs $32,000 for staff washrooms. The Ompah Fish Hatchery needs $30,000 for general repairs. The Ward 1 Public Works Garage needs $40,000 cladding and water supply. The Cloyne Washroom and Change House needs $35,000 for roofing and mechanical work. Just about all of the facilities need some work, mostly related to accessibility. Council praised and accepted the report, but any decisions were relegated to 2019 budget deliberations. However, there were indications that some of the facilities might not survive the budgetary process. “The opportunity for the Fish Hatchery to come back into useful operation is nil to none,” said Dep. Mayor Fred Perry, who was chairing the meeting in the absence of Mayor Ron Higgins. The Cloyne washroom isn’t likely to get much love either. Even though one audience member pointed out that the ball diamond there is used for seniors slow-pitch, manager of community development Corey Klatt said: “This is my 11th year and it was out of service when I came.”   Councillors to be compensated for loss of tax exempt incomeCouncil accepted Treasurer Kelly Watkins’ report on the impact of losing the 1/3 tax-free status for municipal councilors remuneration but put off any decisions until the first meeting of the new Council on Dec. 5. Options range from doing nothing to a new pay structure for meeting attendance, mileage and per diem to outright compensation for the tax-free loss, which Watkins estimated would cost the Township about $17,000. Coun. Vern Hermer was in favour of some sort of compensation. “I don’t think it’s fair that we should take a hit because the federal of provincial governments want a bit more in their coffers,” Hermer said. However, Coun. John Inglis seemed OK with the potential loss in salary. “We’re above the median (in pay) and we’re above Central Frontenac,” Inglis said. “I feel we’re well compensated. “Leave the status quo; for our population, we have a very large staff.” “We won’t attract many young Council members with this pay,” said Coun. Gerry Martin. “Whether John (Inglis) thinks he’s overpaid — which he probably is.” Watkins’ said “across the province, the majority of municipalities are compensating councilors for the 1/3 loss.” Palmerston BeachWhile the Mississippi Valley Conservation Authority is open to sell the Palmerston Beach property to North Frontenac Township (MVCA passed a resolution Aug. 3 granting an “option to purchase for a nominal sum”), just what the Township plans to do regarding the property is undecided. “We did sell property on Malcolm Lake years back that went to a developer,” said Coun. Gerry Martin. “That’s the reason for the buy-back clause.” “I don’t agree that $128,000 should be spent to create a park that would only be used by a few people,” said Coun. Wayne Good.   Good burlap after bad?Coun. Gerry Martin reported that $1,500 worth of burlap has been put down in Ardoch Lake in an effort to combat Eurasian Milfoil. However, Martin was less than enthusiastic about the chances for success in the project. “We have it in so many of our lakes, I think it’s a lost cause,” he said.   NAEC visitWhile applauding the North Addington Education Centre’s interest in municipal government, North Frontenac Council won’t be showing up to an assembly in any kind of numbers, on the advice of Clerk Tara Mieske. “I would recommend only three or fewer go so that no business of Council will be advanced,” she said. Coun. John Inglis volunteered to attend.

CENTRAL FRONTENAC NEWS

Central Frontenac Council – December 11

Central Frontenac Council – December 11

Central Frontenac Council passed a bylaw allowing for the installation of a stop sign on Cross Road at Armstrong Road at its regular meeting Tuesday in Oso Hall. Acting Public Works Manager David Armstrong said this is the final stage of a project begun in September to provide c...

Small Business Expo “brings entrepreneurs together”

To a certain extent, last Friday’s Small Business Expo ’18 at the St. Lawrence College Employment Service in Sharbot Lake was a vendors’ market. Many of the local usual suspects were there and things were for sale. But this one was a little bit different. “We thought we’d take advantage of the expertise in the area,” said coordinator Karen McGregor. “We started calling it the entrepreneurs expo but that wasn’t sexy enough so . . . vendors sale.” But, unlike the various craft shows and farmers markets, sales and fellowship wasn’t the only thing on the agenda. “We wanted to tap into the wisdom of people who’ve been doing this for awhile,” she said. “It’s an opportunity to learn the do’s and don’ts from people who’ve learned them already.” In order to accommodate this exchange in the marketplace of ideas, unlike most similar events, this one was free for the participants. Also, they held it on a weekday. “Most of our participants are busy with other shows on the weekends, particularly at this time of year,” she said. “And, having it next door to the Festival of Trees didn’t hurt either. “Many people coming for the festival stopped in here too.” One of the things McGregor said people were exploring was the possibility of teaming up. “If I take half of your treasures to one show and you take half of mine to another, we cover two shows and double our exposure,” she said. And another thing that set this show apart was the presence of Frontenac Community Futures Development Corporation Director Anne Prichard. “Anne’s an excellent resource,” McGregor said. “It’s one thing to say how do you make your jams and jellies sell and quite another to find loans and grants to get your business off the ground.” This was the first such expo and judging from the response of the 10 vendors present, McGregor said they plan to do it again next year. “It brings local entrepreneurs together,” McGregor said.

Tips for Air Travel Entertaining and Informative Seminar at The Centre

“You would not believe some of the things we get asked,” travel consultant Carrie Borer of Independent by Flight Centre told an audience at The Centre last Thursday in the first of what Rural Frontenac Community Services hopes will be a series of seminars. This one was called Tips for Air Travel. “We had clients going to Las Vegas who wanted a room with an ocean view, another lady who didn’t want a window seat on the airplane because she’d just had her hair done and a guy who wanted two rooms — ‘one for me and my wife and one for my girlfriend.’” Borer said she and colleague Eric Zierer are part of Flight Centre, “so we always have a wealth of information we can share.” First and foremost, she said, was to always carry your passport and a photocopy of your passport when you travel. “Before you leave home, take a photo with your phone of your passport, your insurance papers and itinerary,” she said. “You should always have a tag on your luggage but no name or address — people do hang around luggage carts to see who won’t be at home for awhile.” A business card inside your luggage is a good idea, she said. She said at $35 per bag each way for checked baggage, it pays to know how to pack your carry on. “I like to use packing cubes and roll up clothes in them,” she said. “Usually, if your carry on is too heavy, they’ll let you check it for free. “However, I can tell you something today that’ll be changed tomorrow.” One thing that probably won’t change is the advice to contact the Canadian embassy or consulate in whatever country you’re travelling to to let them know how long you’ll be there and when you’ll be arriving and departing, she said. “If something happens, like a natural disaster or terrorist threat, the Canadians the embassy knows about will be first in line for evacuation,” she said. Also, taking expensive jewelry is a bad idea, she said. “When I go away, I don’t take jewelry, just dime store things and my wedding band,” she said. “And guys, if you’re going to propose while on vacation, do it with a cheap ring and give her the good one when you get back home.” Catherine Tyscick said RFCS is looking for others to hold similar seminars, particularly not-for-profit groups and not closed groups. You can contact her at 613-279-3151, ext. 201 if you might have a seminar.

Metis Rendezvous

Mr. Flegal’s grade three/four class at Granite Ridge Education Centre class was honoured to have local Métis community members, Candace Lloyd and Nicholas Delbaere-Sawchuck, visit and share their knowledge and teachings through guided discussion and questions last week,. Students learned about the Métis culture and the significance of the sash and the colours they used. They engaged in a finger weaving technique used for sash-making and created their own mini bracelet.  Candace and Nicholas introduced the students to Métis music and the basic steps of “jigging”, a traditional Métis dance.   The Indigenous Studies and Indigenous English classes (and a couple of other visitors) also learned jigging from Candace Lloyd.  It was a very energetic and fun workshop, which required fans and open windows.  Ms. Lloyd also taught the students the traditional Metis method of dot-painting, and students made a collaborative work of art consisting of “tree cookies” (disks cut from the limb of a birch tree).   Candace Lloyd is a citizen of the Métis Nation of Ontario and Elected Secretary Treasure of High Land Waters Metis Community Council. This council is a chartered council of Métis Nation of Ontario.  She is a Traditional Knowledge Holder for Métis Way of Life. Giant Indigenous Map In addition to the Métis Rendezvous, students and staff had the opportunity to walk across Canada last week.  The Canadian Geographic Society’s Giant Indigenous Map was laid out in the gym and various Elementary and Secondary classes visited and learned a variety of lessons.  On one of the days, Gillianne Mundell, the Indigenous Consultant from the LDSB, led students through some learning experiences.   There are very few post-contact place names on the map, so students and staff struggled to orient themselves.  Students learned about a variety of subjects, including climate change, treaties, language, and residential schools.

No Support for Hillier Initiative at Central Frontenac Council

Central Council passed a resolution stating that it does not support MPP Randy Hillier’s request for support in his investigation of Conservation Authority practices at the final meeting of the outgoing council on November 27. Coun. Brent Cameron questioned some of the Conservation Authority practices. “I will support Council in its decision but CAs aren’t as easy to deal with as perhaps they might be,” Cameron said. “Remember when Welly Smith Road was flooded? “There was a beaver dam on Authority property and we went back and forth with them on it too long. If it were anybody else, we could have forced action on it far more quickly.” CAO/Clerk Cathy MacMunn said that she supported the CAs as they do site visits when planning matters are involved that would be far more expensive if private companies had to be engaged to do the same inspections. “If their (CAs) responsibilities were downloaded to municipalities, there’s no way we could afford it,” said Coun. Bill MacDonald. “Downloading can happen bit by bit,” said Mayor Francis Smith. “And we have been downloaded on before. “It’s more cost effective for a small rural municipality to do it the way we’ve been doing it.”

SOUTH FRONTENAC NEWS

Holiday Market packs PCPS on a rather snowy day in December

Holiday Market packs PCPS on a rather snowy day in December

Outside, there were huge snowflakes falling and cars were parked all along Road 38. Inside Prince Charles Public School, there was the hustle and bustle of the 13th annual Holiday Market, a cooperative effort between the school’s parents council and the Frontenac Farmers Ma...

Sutherland challenges closed meeting procedure

South Frontenac Council began their COW meeting an hour early, in order to hold a closed Session prior to the main meeting. The four agenda items for the closed session were listed as:”Litigation; Matters concerning an Identifiable Individual (listed twice, as two separate items); and Matters subject to Client Solicitor”. This is South Frontenac’s usual way of introducing “in camera” sessions. This week Councillor Sutherland attempted to make a motion challenging the minimal nature of the information given to the public concerning the nature of the matters to be discussed, prior to going into closed session. Quoting the Ontario Ombudsman who said the motion to hold a closed meeting must: “give as much information about the subject as possible, without undermining the reason for closing the meeting,” Sutherland contended that telling the public what the general subject of the meeting is to be, would increase transparency and openness. He registered his disapproval at what he saw as ‘improper procedure.’ Mayor Vandewal reminded Sutherland that this was a Committee of the Whole meeting, and motions could only be voted on at Council meetings. He deferred to CAO Orr, as the authority on procedure. Orr said he had ‘sought advice’ on the issue, and felt Council was acting appropriately. “We are following the procedure we have used for the past nine years.” “I will bring this motion back,” said Sutherland, as Council moved into closed session. Splash Pad Report Recreation Supervisor Tim Laprade presented a feasibility report on a splash pad park, prepared at the request of the Loughborough and Portland district recreation committees. The report listed preferred locations, benefits, risks, capitol and operating costs, and included comments from other municipalities. There seems to be strong support from the increasing number of young families in the area, and almost all the municipalities that have installed splash pads report that they are extremely successful and well-used. However, there is little question that they are expensive to build, and have high ongoing operating costs. All the returning Council members were reluctant to move forward without first taking into consideration the rest of the Township’s recreational costs and needs. Councillor Morey asked whether any community groups had shown interest in doing serious fundraising for the project. Laprade said there had been ‘some awareness’. Sleeth was not in favour; “There are lakes everywhere we look.” (One of the proposed sites was Harrowsmith, where there is no nearby lake.) Revill, though listing some of the pending costs for maintaining the Township arena, said the demographic was changing. Mayor Vandewal said “There will always be large-ticket items; I’d like to see a more strategic long-term recreation report, which would include (this proposal) as well as other pending recreation needs. if we’re putting this off for now, the public needs to know why, and what our long-term vision is.” Skate Park FeasibilityLaprade’s second report recommended Council increase the budget for a skateboard feasibility study from 2018’s (unused) $5,000 to a maximum of $15,000 for 2019. The study was not done last year, for study proposals from skate park companies had ranged from $13,500 to $50,000. For several years, there have been delegations and petitions to Council asking for a skateboard park in South Frontenac. A feasibility study based on consultation with the skate park advisory group would provide a concept plan, a draft implementation plan including costs, funding opportunities, and location recommendations. Mayor Vandewal said that the increasing number of young families meant that a splash pad would have more ‘uptake.’ Sutherland said the skateboard group is a poorly-served population, and Roberts said that there have been skateboard requests coming to Council for many years, now. Revill said a feasibility study would give Council ‘something to work with.” Laprade’s recommendation will go forward for budget consideration. Fire Services: Operational Review and RecommendationsFire Chief Darcy Knott spoke to a 51 page report with 25 recommendations. (“I trust you have all read this,” said Mayor Vandewal to Council.) Saying that “The current state of the department is good and has a potential to be great,” Knott outlined the needs for an increase in the level of service to residents, greater accountability, and steps to mitigate liability. Some of these issues can be attributed to changes in legislation, and some to lack of full amalgamation of the Township’s fire services. Knott listed his top priorities: Hire an Assistant Deputy Chief of fire prevention, Recruit 25 more firefighters, using a publicity campaign and orientation sessions, Close Station #9 (off the Burnt Hills Road, East of Battersea.) It is moldy, unused and full of rodents, Repurpose Station #8 (Sunbury) and construct a new station a few km north, to serve Battersea and Sunbury, Surplus the old station #6 Perth Road, Get budget to buy a demo Air Trailer Unit. This would be used to refill the Department’s 100 air bottles, both annually and after each use. Usual cost of such units is between $135,000 and $155,000 new: Knott has an option on a lightly-used one for $32,000, fully serviced and warranted. Currently the Township has the use of a non-mobile unit on short-term loan. Spare pagers: some are needed for reserve when the present ones need repairs. Council agreed that Knott should not have to wait for the budget process to get the Air Unit: reserve funds could be used now, and replaced from the 2019 budget. They also asked him to get prices on a bulk purchase of pagers to serve present needs and to supply the anticipated new volunteer recruits. Knott will bring this information to next week’s Council meeting. Cataraqui Trail RestructuringCouncillor Sutherland reported from the Cataraqui Conservation Authority that there had been a restructuring of the responsibilities for the Cataraqui Trail. Though the Trail has always been owned by the Conservation Authority, it has until now been maintained by a volunteer work group of Friends of the Cat Trail. However, due to some major need for expensive repairs (especially several washouts), the Conservation Authority will assume responsibility for the trail upkeep, with continuing assistance from the volunteer group.

Performing for Seniors Nourishes This Singer’s Soul

Mark McDonell loves his job. In a coffee shop earlier in November, the talented father of two talks with awe about his work as a professional musician. “I don’t take it for granted,” he said, “I’m from a small town and I didn’t have a lot of money growing up. Now, I get to travel to different countries and perform. I’m 48 years old and I keep wondering, “When are people going to find out it’s all smoke and mirrors?” A professional singer and guitar player since high school, Mark is the face of AMBUSH, a popular band in Kingston and Frontenac County. Known for their new country sound, the band has played to sold-out crowds from coast-to-coast. “We’re very busy as a band,” he admits, referencing the band’s rise to fame in Canada since he arrived in Kingston approximately 20 years ago. “We’re going to Canadian Forces Station Alert next week to perform for the troops. We’ve done some crazy stuff.” Nowadays, Mark divides his time between performing for big crowds and singing for smaller groups such as residents of retirement and long-term care homes. “It’s kind of interesting,” says Mark about performing at the homes with just an acoustic guitar and speaker. “The band has had a lot of big shows, performing in front of thousands of people. My performances at the retirement and long-term care homes are smaller and more intimate, which is very rewarding. Music is a healer.” Growing up in a musical family, Mark began playing with his father for seniors in Perth when he was just 10 years old. He is now doing the same with his son. “The old folks love the kids. It’s like I’m not even in the room,” he says with a laugh about the reaction his son receives when he starts to play the drums. He also talked about the pleasure he derived when he played for his mother-in-law, Nancy Langs, when she was battling cancer. “A lot of patients would gather outside her hospital room when I performed for her,” he says quietly. “A lot of the classic country songs I’m singing now for residents is what I was singing for Nancy.” Before her death earlier this year, Nancy leaned down and told Mark, “Keep doing this.” Those three words left a lasting impression on him. “I find it low-key, but I leave the homes feeling more fulfilled as a musician,” he says with honesty. “It’s just giving back really.” Opening with the song “You Are My Sunshine”, Mark talks about his enjoyment performing for residents & staff while accompanied by Nancy’s 78-year-old husband, Garry. “He’s my roadie,” says Mark with a chuckle about his father-in-law. “He would prefer to be out doing something, rather than being home alone. He loves to see the reaction of the people. He loves these shows. I have never gone into a home where the reaction hasn’t been fantastic.” A regular performer at dance halls across the region, Mark is hoping to play for more seniors in Frontenac County. “I try to make them smile and laugh,” he says kindly about his popular show for seniors. “I truly, truly enjoy it.” To reach Mark McDonell, please contact him at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Jennie Cousineau has one hundred years of memories

Edna Webb was quite young when she gave birth to Jennie, her first child, at home on Little Franklin Lake near Perth Road on December 6, 1918. WWI had just ended, and horse power still ruled on the roads. The Webb’s - George, Edna and baby Jennie, soon moved to Ida Hill, at the Washburn Road in the southeastern corner of Storrington Township, in what would become South Frontenac 80 years later. At the age of 82 Jennie was one of the recipients of the second annual South Frontenac Volunteers of the Year Awards in June of 2000. The award recognised her decades long commitment to the Women’s Institute, 4H club, the United Church and numerous other community efforts. The other winners that year included Mel Fleming from Bedford, Percy Snider from Loughborough and John McDougall, Portland. A lot happened to Jennie Webb between 1918 and 2000, and a lot more has happened since. As she reflected last week on the occasion of her 100th Birthday at Fairmount Home, with her eldest daughters Nadine and Linda at her side, a picture of a life of family, hard work, faith, and a love of the rural, farming life, emerged. Jennie Webb grew up at Ida Hill, where she attended elementary school at the Ida Hill School. She was not an only child for long, as 6 younger brothers arrived in succession. Her father George worked for the telephone company as the service was being built out in the region, and was an active beekeeper. After leaving Bell, he had as many as 250 hives on his own property and the properties of many neighbours around the countryside. Jennie’s mother Edna was a midwife. When Jenny was 15, a family from Desert Lake, near Verona, bought the farm across the road from the Webbs. John Abraham was the eldest son of that family. He was about 22. With his sister, he walked the family’s stock of cattle over from Desert Lake to Ida Hill in one long day. There must have been a first glance, a first time when 22-year old John Cousineau and 15 year, Jennie Webb saw each other soon after the Cousineau family arrived at Ida Hill. That first impression is still alive in Jennie. It comes out when she looks at some of the family photos she keeps by her side, a sign of her enduring love for her John Abraham. Two years after meeting, Jennie and John were married. When John passed ten years ago, at the age of 97, they had been married for 72 years. Jennie and John purchased their own farm on the Battersea Road, and moved there in 1942. They have four daughters, Nadine, Linda, Shirley and Marilyn. They ran a Holstein Dairy Farm, and raised chickens for meat and eggs on the farm. It took John ten years to build a new brick house for the family on the property, since he was running the farm while building the house, and they moved into the new house in the 1950’s. In those days, there were four hotels in nearby Battersea. At the Cousineau farm, they would raise 500 chicks at a time. Calls would in from one of the hotels for 3 or 4 dozen broilers for the next day, and Jennie and John were pretty experienced and efficient at preparing chickens. It took them 7 minutes to kill, dry pluck and prepare a chicken for delivery. They would bring up the chickens in the morning, for serving that evening in the dining room. Local food was a way of life back then. Jennie lived in the house until January of last year, when a month after her 99th birthday, mobility issues, hearing and vision loss had progressed to the point where it became necessary to move to Fairmount Home. The farm is still operating, as a cow-calf operation now, in the hands of one of Jennie’s grandsons, one of many family members who continue to live nearby, and her house has been sold, to her great grandson. Jennie’s daughter Linda lives across the road, Nadine is in Inverary, and Shirley lives nearby as well. Marilyn lives in Guelph, but has a summer cottage in Verona. Jennie has 9 grandchildren, 21 great grandchildren, and 6 great-great grandchildren, with another one on the way. Just as they visited at the farmhouse often, her children, grandchildren and great grandchildren drop by Fairmount Home on a regular basis. The changes that have taken place in the world during Jennie’s lifetime are unprecedented in human history. She has bridged the era of horse and carriage and driverless cars. It is a tribute to her lifetime of hard work and devotion to community and family that the rural values she grew up with are still alive in her, and in her family as well.

Inaugural SF council meeting

Deputy fire chief says he's being pushed outBill Babcock, Deputy Fire Chief in Portland, addressed Council about his pending retirement: “I feel that I am being forced to retire: some of my duties have been removed, and I signed my agreement (to retire) under duress.” Babcock said he was 73, in good physical condition, and in the 48th year of service in the department; “April 20, 2020 is my 50-year mark, and I’d like to complete my service then.” He gave Council a document certifying good health, and letters of support from the community. Mayor Vandewal told Babcock that he had asked for a full staff report, in order to bring all council members up to date on the situation, before further discussion. Over 30 supporters left Council chambers with Babcock. Swearing inThe inaugural meeting of South Frontenac Council opened with the swearing-in of Mayor Vandewal and Council members, three of whom, Ray Leonard, Doug Morey and Randy Ruttan are rookies: Pat Barr, Alan Revill, Norm Roberts, Ron Sleeth and Ross Sutherland were all on last Council. “South Frontenac Township is in a strong position, both financially and organizationally,” said Mayor Vandewal in his welcoming address; “but lots of work lies ahead. You will have to make many decisions, not always popular ones. It’s up to you to do what you feel is right.” He listed updating the Official Plan and hiring a new CAO as two of the many challenges ahead, along with the ongoing pressures of taxation and financing. Warden Higgins brought greetings from the County. Rezoning the RezoningA property on Bedford Road Sydenham had been rezoned last May to recognize a reduced road frontage and lot size for a new residential lot and a retained parcel. The intent was to remove a frame house and garage which were very close to the Bedford Road improvement area, and to permit two residential lots in their place. However this rezoning had been prematurely brought to Council by the then planning department, before the survey was completed. In October, when the survey was submitted, it was found that both lots had shorter frontages and one had a smaller lot area than had been indicated in the original information. The current rezoning is a largely technical correction, as the properties are within the Sydenham settlement area, and will be served by municipal water. Only one comment came from a neighbour: “I’d like to see them get on with (tearing it down!)” When Council passed the new amendment, they also agreed to charge the applicant only half the usual fee, for although the change required staff time and work, it appeared to have been a staff decision to initially bring the issue to Council with incomplete information. Hartington-related MotionsTwo motions related to the Hartington Subdivision, one requesting reimbursement of $28,792 to the Hartington Community Association for consultant fees, the other for Township funded twice annual private well testing, were deferred until the appeal period of the OMB decision is completed. Recreation CommitteeTim Laprade, Township Recreation Supervisor, asked Council to authorize and include in the 2019 budget, the engagement of an external facilitator to help in the revision of the Recreation Committee structure in order to better meet the current and projected recreation and leisure needs of the whole Township. He also asked for budget approval for a new software  package to do program registration and facility booking. The current software has been discontinued. This would be a one-time capital cost of $6,000 and an annual operating cost of $8,650. Council accepted these reports, and Laprade assured them that the review and revision will recognize the continued importance and involvement of community volunteers. Sleeth emphasized that he is opposed to any ‘centralization’ of recreation committees, and wants to keep the local rec committees.     Private Lane UpgradesMark Segsworth, Director of Public Services, asked Council to approve payments totalling $78,109. for 2018 Private Lane Upgrading Assistance. It is the tenth year for this popular program which subsidizes up to 50% of completed private road work which will improve access for emergency vehicles. This year, 27 lane groups were approved to submit invoices for subsidy of completed work. Mayor Vandewal complimented Segsworth for all his work in having initiated and developed this very successful program. 2019 Budget ScheduleCouncil received the 2019 budget schedule which will begin Dec 11, and wind up in mid-February or early March. CAO Orr reminded Councillors that Saturday Jan 26 must be set aside for an all-day budget session. Council AppointmentsAfter some minor wrangling about procedure, Council selected Deputy Mayors, and agreed that each Deputy Mayor should serve for one year, in the following order: Sleeth, Sutherland, Barr and Leonard. Councillor Revill was chosen to serve the next four years as Township representative on County Council, along with Mayor Vandewal. (Sleeth was also nominated, but respectfully declined.) Staff AppointmentsAngela Maddocks was promoted to Township Clerk and Division Registrar for South Frontenac, and the role of Deputy Clerk was transferred to CAO Orr. Maddocks has completed Clerk I and II training in the past year, as well as training in election operations. Emily Caird was welcomed as the new Executive Assistant, and Michelle Hanna has been hired as a Planning Assistant. Bale Wrap RecyclingSleeth commended Mark Segsworth on his leadership in developing a means of recycling bale wrap. Segsworth reminded him that Councillor Larry York had been the one who had pioneered the idea. Three-way Stop a Good StartCouncil agreed with Mayor Vandewal’s motion to make the corner of Latimer and Round Lake Roads a three-way stop, until completion of projected construction to improve the intersection. January 2019 meeting DatesAcknowledging a reluctance to hold Council meeting on New Year’s Day, Orr announced the January meeting schedule will be moved forward one week: Council will be on Jan 8 and 22; Committee of the Whole will meet January 15.

FRONTENAC COUNTY NEWS

Ruttan to chair Limestone Board of Trustees in 2019.

Ruttan to chair Limestone Board of Trustees in 2019.

Suzanne Ruttan has been the South Frontenac Township trustee to the Limestone District School Board since 2010. She has served as the Board Vice Chair for the past three years, and when the new Board was sworn to office last night in Kingston, she assumed the role of Chair of the...

Rotary Cash Calendar

Local Rotary Clubs from Kingston, Napanee and Frontenac are selling the 2019 Rotary Cash Calendars this month. The $20 calendars are similar to other calendars in featuring scenes from Kingston and Frontenac County (many of the photos in the calendar are the work of Inverary-based photographer Joe Furtado) Purchasers of the calendars are also eligible for daily draws throughout the year, each of which carries a cash prize, ranging from $25 on regular days, to $500 on special holidays. There are a total of $15,000 in cash prizes available, and no more than 3750 calendars are sold. Rotary has deep roots in Frontenac County. It is one of the founding organisations behind the RKY Camp on Eagle Lake in Parham, (RKY stands for Rotary/Kiwanis/YMCA) and has an active membership from South Frontenac. The Sydenham High School Music Program is also selling the calendars as a fundraiser for their program, and the calendars are available at the school. In addition to Sydenham High School, the calendars are available at Ormsbees Mercantile, The Sunbury General Store, Inverary Pharmasave, at Sydenham Farm and Pet Supply and Willow Agriservices Ltd. For further information or to arrange for purchase/delivery, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Frontenac County’s Best Landlord Award –$200 prizes at stake

Frontenac County’s Best Landlord Award seeks to champion landlords who strive to break conventional standards and provide their tenants with the best service possible. We are looking for local landlords that go above and beyond to provide safe and affordable housing for the individuals and families in these communities. The winning landlord and the tenant that nominated them will each receive a $200 gift card. Nominations for this award close December 20th, 2018. “We are looking for good landlords, we know they are out there – we have had the good fortune to work with them throughout the Housing and Homelessness System. But we need to know who else is out there that fits into this category of being a good landlord,” says Amanda Pantrey, Rural housing liaison worker at Southern Frontenac Community Services. “It is no secret that we experiencing a major housing shortage situation in the county, and finding landlords has proven to be difficult. This award is about trying to encourage existing landlords to work with us and keep people safe and at home in their own community,” adds Pantrey. For more details or to nominate your landlord, simply visit www.sfcsc.ca/landlord and tell us why you think your landlord deserves the title of Frontenac County’s Best Landlord. Details are listed on the website. Call Amanda at 613-376-6477 ext. 208 for more details.

Frontenac Rentals – taking advantage of the growing accommodation market

Allan Zahara has been living on 14 Island Lake for a number of years, and for most of that time he has been working in the e-learning sector in healthcare. “It has meant heading off to Toronto from time to time, and maintaining a professional profile outside of where I live. My goal now is to live and work in South Frontenac and Frontenac County, and that’s what got me into the accommodations field,” he said, in an interview from Sharbot Lake in early November. Zahara has been developing his new company, Frontenacrentals.com, for a couple of years. “I saw that there is a lot of potential for waterfront property owners to take advantage of the global market for the lifestyle that some of us enjoy all the time around here, but don’t know where to start and what they need to do,” he said. Using himself as a bit of a test case, Zahara developed a 500 square foot cabin on 14 island lake, on his own property, which he rents out on a nightly basis at a premium price. He uses Airbnb as a booking service, and his cottage is booked from early spring until well into the fall, even into the winter, belying the traditional concern that it is only possible to rent out a cottage in the summer months. Frontenacrentals.com provides a set of services for property owners looking to generate revenue from their waterfront properties. These include: online marketing and customer service, concierge and security services, staging and design, professional cleaning and maintenance, and account setup and training. “There are some key factors involved in establishing the kind of 5-star ratings that can elevate a property to a gold star rating on Airbnb. We managed to get there for our property and the increase in interest has been dramatic,” he said. One of the key factors to get to that point is to cover all the bases, from staging a property the way a realtor might, to excellent photography and making sure that visitors are greeted, the house rules are clear and reasonable, and that everything is impeccably clean. "Homeowners may not realize they are sitting on tens of thousands of untapped revenue potential and that it can be done with very little effort or risk. They just need to ensure the whole experience, both online and on site, is white glove to appeal to a global market. When online shoppers see top reviews from people from many countries, the bookings flow in. It's all about knowing how to get those top reviews while ensuring your property and guests are in good hands." Zahara thinks that the development his business, and others, reflects a change in the tourism potential for Frontenac County in the near future, “I think that something is happening in our region. New businesses are coming up, visitors from all around the world are interested in coming. It is a good time for new people to step forward, and we are hoping our business can help that happen,” he said. For a full list of Frontenac Rentals services go to their website or contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Frontenac welcomes new Community Safety Officer

For many, police officers are modern day heroes. To be a good police officer means performing a job that is difficult, dangerous and idealistic.. It is also incredibly rewarding. Speaking from the Ontario Provincial Police (OPP) detachment in Hartington, Const. Curtis Dick was happy to talk his job as the new Community Safety Officer (CSO) for Frontenac County. Tall and confident, the ambitious father of three assumed the role from Const. Roop Sandhu on July 2. He has been with the police force for almost 22 years, most of which with special operations. “I’m enjoying it immensely,” he says with a smile when asked about his work to make the community & police department closer and stronger. “There’s a lot of great organizations in the Frontenac area that are doing great work. It’s remarkable.” Looking down at a sheet of paper with his short and long-term goals, Const. Dick speaks with passion about community mobilization. One of his first priorities is to help people with mental health issues. “When people are dealing with the police, they’re either at crisis or in crisis,” he explains. “Everyone needs a conversation. There are a lot of resources that can be accessed. We need to condense it and make it easier for people to get the help they need.” Raised in Cobden, Const. Dick has served with the Frontenac OPP Detachment since January 2017. He says many of the issues facing this jurisdiction are the same as other rural areas. “What we’re dealing with here is very common, unfortunately,” he explains. “Some families could benefit from parental skill building and programs for children. How do we get them the resources – that’s the number one thing. “My philosophy is very simple. My goal is to make you better,” he says sincerely. “I want to strengthen your ankles to help you walk on your own. It’s quirky, but it opens some doors. “How do we help you now,” he explains kindly. Reading from his list of goals, Const. Dick plans to use the next three years to support and build relationships across Frontenac County. He talks about working with community groups already helping seniors become less isolated through day programs such as Seniors and Law Enforcement Together (SALT) and partnering youth with peer mentors. He also wants to increase police presence in schools to show students the person behind the uniform; building relationships with a promise to serve and protect. “There are 3,700 seniors in this area. How do we reach them?” he asks rhetorically.. “We need to continue to build on community connections to reduce their isolation.” The new CSO also wants to promote a service by the police auxiliary that helps residents safeguard their property from break and enters. Some of his long-term goals include increasing the detachment’s exposure through social media & community events and strengthening bonds with lake associations.. “If even half of these goals come to fruition, it would be awesome,” he said. “Policing is not just a job, it’s a calling,” he said “How many people can I get to know? How many lives can I impact?” To learn more about Constable Curtis’ goals and the services offered by the Frontenac OPP Detachment, please contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or (613) 305-2193.

ADDINGTON HIGHLANDS NEWS

Addington Highlands to Consult the Public Over Cannabis

Addington Highlands to Consult the Public Over Cannabis

Among local councils, Addington Highlands has been the most pro-active over cannabis regulations. This is, at least in part, because the township was notified by residents several months ago that two separate growing operations were up and running within its borders. One of them...

Community Builder Awards

The Township of Addington Highlands awarded the Community Builder Awards at the Township’s Annual Christmas Dinner on November 23, 2018. The Committee added new categories to the list of awards this year and named a  Sportsperson of the Year and Emerging Youth Leader. Joel Hasler was presented with the Sportsperson of the Year Award, this award is to recognize an individual who has dedicated their time to sport in our community. These are individuals have demonstrated leadership, encouraged sport ethics and fair play and contributed to improving sport opportunities in the community. These individuals are positive role models or have made exceptional contributions within the sporting community. Avery Cuddy was presented with the Emerging Youth Leader Award, this award is to recognize an individual who has been a positive role model, who demonstrates strong leadership qualities and who has contributed to the community individually or as part of a team. Individuals who inspire volunteerism in others through their own initiative, enthusiasm and commitment. The Township of Addington Highlands thanks all those who help build a better Community and congratulates this year’s recipients.

Addington Highlands holds special meeting to talk about going to pot

Addington Highlands Township seems to be a bit ahead of its neighbours on the cannabis question and last week held a special Council meeting to determine what its options might be. To that end, Council invited Nancy Wartman, a planner with the IBI Group, to run them through what the rules are as they currently exist. Wartman outlined the various governmental roles — federal, provincial and municipal — as well as cannabis for medicinal use, and cannabis for recreational use. But most importantly, she outlined the issues municipalities have to consider, including cultivation, processing, personal cultivation, both recreational and medical, retail stores for recreational use and the opt-in/opt out aspect which municipalities must decide by Jan. 22, 2019. “When regulating the following — cultivation, processing, personal cultivation, retail stores (coming April 2019) — we need to be thinking about land use compatibility, odour, noise, traffic/parking, secutiry/safety and servicing,” Wartman said. All of these pertain primarily to recreational marijuana. “The federal government regulates medical marijuana,” she said. “And Health Canada is to inform municipalities when there is a a grow-op in their jursidication.” “Except that they don’t,” interjected Reeve Henry Hogg, referring to grow-ops on Upper Flinton Road and Clarke Line Road. “The biggest issue we’ve had is grow-op. “I’ve been told there are 8,000 plants in the Township.” “We’re not entitled to know the exact number of plants under the Protection of Privacy Act,” said CAO/Clerk-Treasurer Christine Reed. Still, when it comes to medical cultivation of cannabis, there likely isn’t much a municipality can do, Wartman said. For federally licensed producers, the considerations are, she said: • Do you want large scale producers to come to your municipality • Do you want farmland to be utilized for growing of cannabis • What level of servicing is required for indoor/greenhouse/outdoor growing • Do you want to differentiate betwwenn indoor growing versus greenhouse growing versus outdoor growing • Are there lands available for these types of uses/where do you envision them locating. And, when it comes to medical cultivation, local regulation of medical cannabis potentially engages Charter (of Rights and Freedoms) issues, she said. When it comes to personal recreational use cultivation, it could be handled in the Official Plan, Zoning Bylaw, a new licensing bylaw or a nuisance bylaw (for odour). “But can we really regulate where it is grown or if it has to be grown in a greenhouse?” said Hogg. “We’ve had odour complaints about a pre-existing operation but how much control can we have?” “I guess we have to realize we have quite the underground economy here and of course you can get it online,” said Dep. Reeve Helen Yanch. When it comes to retail operations, there are some incentives to opt in, such as $15 million in funding available from the provincial government, job creation, tax assessment and tourism. However, they require a municipality to opt in before Jan. 22, 2019. Wartman said she thought a municipality would have considerable control over the location of retail operations through zoning, either by treating it as retail use (ie C1 Zone) or defining a Cannabis Retail Facility and permitting it only in new, use-specific zone or existing zones where appropriate. Such a new zone would likely include provisions to regulate separation from sensitive land uses, separation from other retail cannabis stores, parking, signage, lighting, hours of operation, etc. Reed pointed out that if you opt in, that’s it, you’re in for good. If you opt out (ie prohibiting retail sales), you can opt in at a later date, but it’s likely that the $15 million in funding would no longer be available. “My recommendation would be to opt out to buy some time,” said Reed. “It would be good to have some more public input which could be a survey on the website,” said Coun. Kirby Thompson. “We enjoyed the presentation but It just kind of makes our water a little more murky.” “I don’t think this going to work out the way the federal government thinks,” said Coun. Tony Fritsch. “If you can grow your own, why would you buy it?”

OPP - Break And Enter To Garage

(Napanee, ON)- On Thursday, November 15th, 2018 an officer with the Kaladar Detachment of the Ontario Provincial Police responded to a report of a break and enter in Cloyne, Township of Addington Highlands. The victim reported that sometime overnight between 9 p.m. on Wednesday, November 14th and 2:00 a.m. on Thursday, November 15th an unknown person(s) stole a Stihl MS362 chainsaw, with a 20 inch bar, orange and black in colour, from their garage. Further police canvassing of neighbours in the area revealed that a full 5 gallon red gas can was stolen from a nearby residence as well. Anyone with information in relation to this incident is asked to contact the Kaladar OPP at 1-888-310-1122 or Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477 (TIPS), where you may be eligible to receive a cash reward of up to $2,000.

Land O'Lakes Bells of Peace

Remembrance Day 2018 will long be remembered by the young and not so young people of the Land O’Lakes area. Thanks to the Frontenac News (Nov 8 - Ringing Of Bells...) for mentioning Bells of Peace commemorating Armistice 100. Quick calls late Friday night revealed that no such commemoration was planned for the area. Hastily, social media was activated, friends called friends and 36 hours later, the Lions Hall was filled to capacity (120) with some standing. The Cloyne and District Historical Society lent us the church bell acquired from the defunct Anglican Church in Cloyne and at sunset, Scouts, Girl Guides and other young children rang the bell 100 times while a You Tube video of the sacrifices made during the Great War played in the background.   Sadly, the Land O’Lakes Royal Canadian Legion closed its doors last year. It was felt that not unlike many young soldiers during wars, the torch must be picked up by others when comrades fall if the goal is to be achieved. Hence, the Lions Club of Land O’Lakes picked up the torch, the community responded and our goal of remembering Them was achieved. Moreover, some of those who rang the bell may not know now why they were doing it, but you can be sure that they will forever remember doing it.   The Lions thank all for the excellent response and the numerous comments received. With your help, we will continue in our quest to live by our motto “We Serve”.

EDITORIALS

  • Remember when ... pot became legal
    It has now been two weeks since marijuana became legal in Canada, and it is also about 10 days, for most Canadians, since the novelty will have worn off. The tv cameras are all gone from the new legal dispensaries, as are the line ups, but apparently not the product…
    Written on Thursday, 01 November 2018 11:30 in Editorials
  • The misguided fear surrounding Proportional Representation
    A recent opinion piece, titled “What history can teach us about proportional representation,” published on September 9 in The Toronto Star, concludes that Proportional Representation (PR) was to blame for the 15 European democracies that fell into dictatorship in history. The basis of this argument was “governments often lacked effectiveness,…
    Written on Thursday, 01 November 2018 11:29 in Editorials
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LETTERS

  • Re – Hartington subdivision
    The Hartington Community Association (HCA) was formed to pursue public concerns about the quantity and quality of groundwater in the Hartington area. Local residents and farmers are dependent on private wells for drinking water and livestock watering purposes. This fact, together with ongoing problems in well wwater yield experienced by…
    Written on Wednesday, 12 December 2018 12:07 in Letters
  • Re – “Taking Aim”
    Before the last municipal election, I attended an all-candidates meeting at the Storrington Centre.  Two of the candidates commented that now our local MPP, Randy Hillier, was in the elected government, South Frontenac had a better chance of receiving provincial funding for some outstanding projects. When I read in the…
    Written on Wednesday, 05 December 2018 14:17 in Letters
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