Strange twists in North Frontenac

Strange twists in North Frontenac

Written By: Jeff Green | Published: October-20-2014 | Category: NORTH FRONTENAC
Tagged Under: North Frontenac

As municipal voting week started early this week, voters in North Frontenac were already reeling as information about the campaign kept coming out. The election started on a tragic note when Mayor Bu...

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Golden Eagles go one and one at the 2014 Bubba Bowl

Golden Eagles go one and one at the 2014 Bubba Bowl

A picturesque setting sun followed by a bright moon made this year’s Bubba Bowl on October 9 one to remember.. The main event was a double header where the Sydenham Golden Eagles took on the LaSalle K...

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One last taste at the SLFM

One last taste at the SLFM

Written By: Julie Druker | Published: October-15-2014 | Category: CENTRAL FRONTENAC
Tagged Under: Sharbot Lake, Farmers Market

For the final market day of the season on Oct. 11, vendors at the Sharbot Lake Farmers Market offered up some tasty treats to their loyal customers as a way to thank them for their ongoing patronage. ...

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Focusing on Fire Prevention at Snow Road Open House

Focusing on Fire Prevention at Snow Road Open House

Written By: Julie Druker | Published: October-15-2014 | Category: NORTH FRONTENAC
Tagged Under: Snow Road, firefighters

Visitors to an open house at the Snow Road Fire Hall in North Frontenac on October 11 learned a few new things about the best ways to prevent and respond to house fires. North Frontenac fire chief St...

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Trick or Eat!

Trick or Eat!

Submitted by NAEC The students of North Addington Education Centre will be suiting up in their Campbell’s Soup costumes on October 31 and knocking on your door! They will be asking for non-perishable...

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Student Vote at GREC

Candidates for the mayoral race in central and north Frontenac took to the stage at the Granite Ridg...

Groovin' the night away at the Centre Stage Cafe

Music lovers came out in droves to the Sharbot Lake Legion on October 9 for the second installment o...

Pleasing art pairings at Sydenham's Grace Centre

Over 30 art lovers gathered at the Southern Frontenac Community Service Corporation’s Grace Centre f...

North Frontenac Council - Oct 14/14

NF coming to terms with OPP costs North Frontenac Township formally received notification from Dere...

Community Support Services integral to keeping people at home

By Ontario Community Support Association (OCSA) and Sonja Alcock October is Community Support Month...

Central Frontenac Council - Oct 14, 2014

Miniature horses can stay at Clarke Road property for now Two months ago Margaret Mallory and Brian...

Central Frontenac Names Interim CAO

The township of Central Frontenac has announced the upcoming appointment of Steven Silver as interim...

Idle Land? Plant Trees!

by Susan Moore Looking to plant trees on your land? Generous subsidies are available from Trees Ont...

New federal Liberal candidate elected in LFK

Two Liberal gatherings took place on October 5 in the new federal riding of Lanark Frontenac Kingsto...

Tree planting in Arden in recognition of National Tree Day

On October 2 a small group of tree lovers gathered at the Recreation Park in Arden for a special tre...

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ADDINGTON HIGHLANDS

Addington Highlands Council – Jun 17/13

Addington Highlands resident Paul Isaacs brought a proposal to council that the township hire him for a nominal fee of $1 to investigate the...

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CENTRAL FRONTENAC

Searson Sisters sizzle in Sharbot Lake

Photo: Searson at The Crossing pub in Sharbot Lake, l-r: Erin, Colleen and Heather Searson The band of three sisters, known simply as ...

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FRONTENAC COUNTY

Flyers looking for elusive first win

The Frontenac flyers went into Sunday night’s (Nov. 1) game against the Picton Pirates hoping to nail that elusive first win of the season. ...

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NORTH FRONTENAC NEWS

North Frontenac Council - Apr 29/14

North Frontenac Council - Apr 29/14

North Frontenac passes budget amid looming OPP cost crisis After several months of budget-crunching sessions between staff and council, North Frontenac managed to square the circle - almost, coming up with a 2014 budget that established a reserve for long-term infrastructure whi...

North Frontenac Council - Apr 8/14

North Frontenac tax levy to go up by 3% Most of increase devoted to long-term needs While the levy to ratepayers in North Frontenac is going up by 3% this year, the operating budgets of township departments have been trimmed. As part of the asset management strategy that Council took on late last year, North Frontenac has set aside 2% of the money they raise from taxation to put in a fund to cover replacement costs for all roads, bridges and buildings that the township owns. That left a tax increase for township operations of $53,214 (1.06%), even as a number of fixed costs went up. “There was some new spending, including $15,000 as part of our doctor recruitment commitment for the Lakelands Health Team and $54,000 for playground equipment, which will only be spent if we get a grant that we have applied for,” said township Chief Administrative Officer Cheryl Robson. “In order to keep from a larger increase in the levy each department was asked to find cuts, which they did. There were no cuts to service, but it will be a lean year this year.” The township's draft budget, which will include a total levy of $5.2 million to North Frontenac ratepayers, was approved in principle at a meeting of council on Monday (April 7) and will be presented for public comment at the beginning of the next council meeting on April 28. It is anticipated that the budget document will be approved by bylaw at that time. The two other components of the tax bill that goes to North Frontenac ratepayers, county and education taxes, are each up by about $35,000 this year, for a total increase of $125,000 to be split among all the township's ratepayers. Pine Lake It's been almost eight years since members of the Ardoch Algonquin First Nation occupied a piece of public land adjacent to a boat launch at Pine Lake, off Ardoch Road. The small property, which is managed by the Ministry of Natural Resources, (MNR) has continued to be used as a boat launch and there is a small road running over it between Ardoch Road and the lake. Back in 2006, the Ardoch Algonquins asserted an Aboriginal claim to the property by cutting trees and putting up a portable metal building. Their stated intention was to establish a band office on the property. But nothing has happened on the property for a number of years, except that brush has grown where the trees had been cleared. The portable building has remained but has not been used at all. In February, the township authorized CAO Cheryl Robson to write the MNR asking that the portable be removed. “Council requests that MNR remove this derelict portable from this property, at your earliest possible convenience,” said Cheryl Robson in a letter to Michael Gatt of the Bancroft ministry office. Last week a letter of response came from Suzy Shalla, Resources Management Supervisor in Bancroft. “I did want to respond to thank you and the Council for bringing forward your concerns regarding the structure located near the boat launch at Pine Lake. MNR is aware of the structure that is located there, however we will not be pursuing removal of the building at this time.” Township office remediation update - Township staff remain housed in portable offices as well as a temporary office in the Clar-Mill fire hall as Service Master and Concord Engineering continue to work on the heating oil spill that took place in early February. Council received a report from Concord Engineering which says that there is no evidence that the ground under the building has been contaminated, but a number of walls and some flooring has been removed as part of ongoing clean-up efforts. There is no time frame for the completion of repairs, which are all covered by the township's insurance policy. Ompah fire hall and community hall back to square one Council soundly rejected two proposals for upgrades to the Ompah fire hall/community hall property. The first proposal, which came in response to a tender for repairs and upgrades, would have cost $360,000. It was supported by Councilor John Inglis and rejected by the rest of Council. The second proposal, which was put forward by Councillor Wayne Good, would have capped spending on upgrades at $50,000, inclusive of a $10,000 accessibility expenditures that is mandated by the Province of Ontario. Although Council has put aside over $200,000 for the project, Good wanted to redirect that money to build a new township office. Good pointed out that there is only one trained firefighter living within a 5 km radius of the hall, and a limited capacity hall would serve the community needs. His proposal was supported by himself, and no one else. Councilor Betty Hunter then proposed that $180,000 be spent on the hall, and that the Ompah fire hall task force, which came up with the proposal that led to the $360,000 tender, be brought back together to figure out how to spend only $180,000 on the building, and do so this year. Her motion was accepted. An additional $50,000 has been pledged by the Ompah volunteers, and there remains an additional $10,000 available for accessibility features.

North Frontenac Council Feb. 3

Septic re-inspection program Ed Gardiner, from Kingston Frontenac Lennox and Addington Public Health, made a proposal to council for a mandatory septic re-inspection program. Until now the township has been contracting with the Mississippi-Rideau Septic System office for a voluntary program. But each of the last two years the number of systems inspected has lagged below the target because a number of landowners have been unresponsive to repeated attempts to engage them in a re-inspection. Changes to Ontario legislation have permitted municipalities to engage in mandatory programs if they choose to do so. One of the stipulations is that the re-inspections be done by the same agency that is responsible for approvals to new septic systems. In the case of North Frontenac that agency is KFL&A Public Health. Gardiner said that it would cost the township $12,000 per year for the health unit to complete 160 inspections, with a focus on inspecting high risk systems, properties with no record of approved sewage systems, or properties with systems that are over 20 years old. He said that the program would be run out of the KFL&A office in Cloyne and that inspection reports would be sent to the landowner and the township. As far as enforcement is concerned Ed Gardiner said that if a report says remedial action is required, “a reasonable amount of time, determined by the township chief building official,” should be given. “If no action is taken the chief building official or the inspector will issue an order to comply,” he said. The township has now received two proposals, one from Mississippi-Rideau and one from KFL&A Public Health. In order to proceed they will have to choose one or the other to do all of their inspection work, on new and old systems. Planner ready to go to the OMB if necessary Joe Gallivan, the planner for Frontenac County, presented the second draft of the Frontenac County Official Plan to Council. Gallivan said the plan, which sets out a policy framework and leaves most of the detailed information to the township plan, has been submitted to the Ministry of Municipal Affairs for comment. Based on the response of the ministry to the Renfrew County Official Plan, and the North Frontenac Official Plan, Gallivan said he is concerned about how the ministry will likely respond to the approach the county is taking. “Frankly I'm not that optimistic at this point. It might be that we end up with an OMB challenge on this.” Two issues are of major concern to Gallivan, and to North Frontenac, who are at an impasse with the ministry with their own plan. One is the ministry position that no new development shall be permitted on private roads, even if there are strong rules in place about the quality and width of those roads. The other deals with the ministry's insistence that development be oriented to hamlets and villages, “which is totally contrary to the demand for development on the ground in places like Frontenac County,” Gallivan said. Construction up in 2013 Building permits were issued for over $7.3 million worth of construction in 2013, including six new inland and 20 new waterfront residences. The total for 2012 was $6.3 million. Mayor talks about County Mayor Clayton, who is also the Warden of Frontenac County, said he remains frustrated about the county budget process. “I still feel there is some push back from some of the managers at the county. When we ask them to make cuts they come back with reasons why it is impossible to make any. All we are asking of the two major programs, Fairmount Home and land ambulance, is that they bring costs to the average of costs among services of comparative size, instead of above the average. I think the administration of both programs could be a bit top-heavy,” he said. In summing up a strategic planning session, Clayton said, “There is an expression that goes 'if the people won't change, change the people'. There may be something that needs to happen like that.” War memorial funding frustration Councilor Gerry Martin has been chairing a task force that has been developing a proposal for a war memorial in the township for the past year. The task force was planning to submit an application for funding to the Community War Memorial Program, a five-year granting program administered by Veterans' Affairs Canada that was set to run until 2015. However, when the task force contacted Veterans' Affairs in January, seeking an application form for the program, they received the response that “unfortunately the Community War Memorial Program is no longer accepting funding applications due to higher than anticipated demand.” Martin prepared a letter to MP Scott Reid asking for his assistance in dealing with Veterans' Affairs on the matter. Council approved the letter.

Clayton Doubtful in North Frontenac

“I don't know yet,” said Bud Clayton when asked if he was planning to seek re-election as mayor of North Frontenac after one four-year term. “If things remain the way they are now, I would say it would be no, but things can change.” Clayton added that he had not planed to run during the last election in 2010, but decided at the last minute to give former Deputy Mayor Jim Beam a run for his money since there were no other candidates coming forward. He ended up winning. “I don't want to hang on past my best-before date,” Clayton said this week, “but I have not made a final decision by any means.” Gutowski leaning towards running in Central Frontenac “In all likelihood I will be running,” two-time incumbent Janet Gutowski said when asked if she was going to run for a third term as mayor of Central Frontenac. “I'm very committed to this township and I think there is still a lot to be accomplished,” she said. Among the issues that Gutowski will be addressing during the election year are seniors’ housing and the future of service delivery in Central Frontenac. “I can see us seeking partnerships with other townships and a continued role for Frontenac County as well,” she said. “Provincial policies are always impacting us as a township, and the City of Kingston has an impact on our residents on a daily basis because they run our social services. It is only through the county that we can even talk to them; there is no other venue.”

North Frontenac Council - Dec. 17/13

North Frontenac pulls back from hall redundancy. After meeting with user groups from the Snow Road, Harlowe, and Clarendon and Miller halls, North Frontenac Council decided to rescind part of a bylaw they passed last July, which stipulated that the halls were to be declared as surplus property in the future. Mayor Clayton had maintained that declaring the halls surplus did not necessarily mean they would be closing, only that they would no longer be in line for re-building at the end of their useful life. However, he has also talked about a township preference for building a single, central hall and township office. Councilors have been hearing from hall users ever since the bylaw was passed in July, and at their meeting the clause about declaring the halls surplus was removed. Asset management plan finalized Vicki Leakey, from KPMG, presented the final version of the North Frontenac Asset Management Plan to council. Municipalities in Ontario are required to have these plans in place if they are to be eligible for provincial infrastructure grants next year. Some municipalities have produced basic documents that were created by sending data to a consulting firm and receiving a template-based document back. In North Frontenac's case, KPMG has met extensively with staff and council and the plan has been under development all year. The North Frontenac plan encompasses paved roads, bridges, equipment, and all township-owned buildings. Next year information about gravel roads will be added. Leakey's report concludes, as she told council last month when presenting a draft, that the township has done a good job of investing in infrastructure needs over the last 10 years, and by parceling off an added 2% in taxation towards infrastructure spending into the future, they will come closer to keeping up with the requirement for rebuilding roads, bridges, equipment, and buildings as they age and need to be replaced. Leakey costed out the rebuilding at $7.5 million. “There is not a municipality in Ontario that is not falling behind, at least to some extent, and North Frontenac is probably doing better than most,” Leakey said. One factor that is not in North Frontenac's favour is its negative growth rate, which among other things, means less money is available from property taxes. The report presented it in stark terms. “While the province's population increased by 19.5% between 1996 and 2011, North Frontenac's population dropped by 3.9%.” And those who remain in North Frontenac are ageing. Thirty-nine percent of the total personal income among township residents is derived from pensions, while the provincial average is 14%. “The greater reliance on fixed income pension reduces the ability of the municipality to raise funds through taxation,” said Leakey's report. OPP billing questions The township supported efforts by other municipalities to scuttle a proposed new billing system for OPP services that would see the township charged on a per household basis, including seasonal as well as permanent residents. Township staff calculate this would bring the North Frontenac bill from $205,000 to $1.15 million - a 458% increase. “It's funny how they bill us for the seasonal residents but when it comes to grants they look only at our permanent residents,” said Mayor Clayton. “They like to play both sides of the coin.”

CENTRAL FRONTENAC NEWS

One last taste at the SLFM

One last taste at the SLFM

For the final market day of the season on Oct. 11, vendors at the Sharbot Lake Farmers Market offered up some tasty treats to their loyal customers as a way to thank them for their ongoing patronage. Given that this summer was considerably wetter and colder than most, assistant m...

Student Vote at GREC

Candidates for the mayoral race in central and north Frontenac took to the stage at the Granite Ridge Education Centre cafetorium on October 14 as part of the school's Student Vote program. The program, which has been running at the school since 2003, is being headed up this year by Mr. McVety's grade 12 history class. Since 2003 students at the school have been involved through the program in all of the municipal, provincial and federal elections except for ones that took place during the summer months. On Tuesday the four mayoral candidates, who included Frances Smith and incumbent Janet Gutowski from Central Frontenac, and Claudio Valentini and Ron Higgins from North Frontenac, took to the stage, each advocating why they are the best choice for mayor. The assembly was mediated by senior students Josh Keefe and Brandy Armstrong and the candidates were timed by Caleb Poirier and Geoff Dewar. Students from grades 7 through 12 listened first to the introductions, after which a number of students posed direct questions to the candidates. The questions from students included: 1) What issues does each candidate feel are the most important in the community? 2) How is he or she going to help youth in the community? and 3) Why they feel that they are the best choice for the job. Later in the week students will vote for the candidates and the winners will be announced at a later date. The aim of the Student Vote program is to engage youth about politics and the issues that directly effect them. Randy McVety said that he wanted to “engage students, especially at the municipal level of government, which is the one closest to them and the one that is most likely to impact their lives.” McVety also cited “the abysmally low level of voter turn out at all government elections”. He hopes that getting youth involved will encourage them to remain engaged in the political process once they graduate from school. McVety was grateful to the four candidates, who took the time to come out and speak to the students.

Groovin' the night away at the Centre Stage Cafe

Music lovers came out in droves to the Sharbot Lake Legion on October 9 for the second installment of the fall session at the Centre Stage Cafe. Beloved house band the Feral Five, (though they happened to be just four on Thursday), book-ended a generous set by Centre Stage Cafe regulars Rob and Nancy Moore and their band, which included Nate Paul on drums, Gabby White on fiddle and back ups, bass man Mike Dellios, and the band's latest addition, Dan Keeler on guitar. The six piece charmed listeners with their relaxing eclectic mix of classic and alternative covers. By the end of the night the ladies were up grooving, bringing another great musical night at the Legion to a rousing close. The next Centre Stage Cafe will take place on Thursday, November 13 when the famed Five will be joined by local rockers One Busted Ego. Admission is $5 and don't forget to wear your dancing shoes.    

Central Frontenac Council - Oct 14, 2014

Miniature horses can stay at Clarke Road property for now Two months ago Margaret Mallory and Brian Skillen received the good news that Central Frontenac Township had decided to stay proceedings that would have forced them to remove their two miniature horses, Teddy and Tommy, from the garage on their one-acre property on the Clarke Road. The stay was to remain in effect until the township had an opportunity to evaluate the bylaw prohibiting livestock on small lots. At a Council meeting on Tuesday afternoon (October 14) council received a report from Frontenac County Planner Joe Gallivan on the bylaw. In his report Gallivan said that the current bylaw “does not provide sufficient definitions, policies or requirements regarding livestock and small-scale agricultural uses, such as hobby". He outlined four options for council's consideration. The first would be to re-zone the property as a rural-exception zone but this would not be suitable given the size of the lot. The second would be to amend the zoning bylaw to clarify agricultural use, essentially classifying miniature horses as pets instead of livestock, but this would lead to confusion about which animals are pets and which are livestock. The fourth option would be to do nothing and apply the bylaw as it stands. The third, the recommended option, is to conduct additional research into how other townships deal with these kinds of issues and how OMAFRA (Ontario Ministry of Food and Rural Affairs) views the issue, and essentially re-write the bylaw to deal with this and other small-scale agriculture issues on under-sized lots. This option was supported by Council. “There are a number of families coming into the township with a view towards starting up small farm operations. It would be good for us to clarify the rules,” said Mayor Janet Gutowski. To a question about who is going to pay for the work required, Gallivan said that since it is the township that is ordering the work, there will be no charge for it. Even though the township may not in the end determine that miniature horses would be permitted on one-acre lots since it appears they would not be permitted in any of the townships mentioned in Gallivan's report, Council decided to maintain the stay on proceedings under the bylaw until Gallivan has completed his work. Chief Administrative Officer Larry Donaldson told Council that the Ministry of the Environment has conducted their own investigation into the converted garage where the horses are housed, a garage that also contains the well head for the property. “In short, subject to one minor issue (a hole in the well casing that the wires to the pump go through needed to be siliconed shut) the MOE have no additional objections to the situation,” Donaldson said. Satisfied with the result, Mallory and Skillen, along with 20 or so supporters, left the meeting in a chipper mood. Presumably, back on Clarke Road, Teddy and Tommy were relaxing and enjoying the unseasonably sunny, warm weather, unaware of all the fuss they had caused. Feds want rent for Sharbot, Crow Lake docks The last time the township interacted with the federal government over dock facilities was several years ago when the government agreed to rebuild the Crow Lake dock, which was in tatters. At the time, the government indicated that as a condition of the rebuild, the township would have to resume ownership of the dock. Nothing happened after that as neither side followed up. Last month the township received a letter from the Department of Fisheries and Oceans stating that rent has not been paid on the docks since 2006, and almost $5,000 is owing. They propose to bill the township about $500 per year for the next five years under a new agreement. “This letter came as a surprise,” said Donaldson. “As far as we can tell we were never invoiced for this money, which is why we never paid it.” Given that the cost of major repairs to the docks can run into the tens of thousands, Councilor Frances Smith said, “I think we should pay the $5,000 and sign a lease for as long as we can on this, and hope they leave the docks as they are.” Councilor John Purdon said he did some research on the Fisheries website and found that of the 399 such docks in Ontario, over 300 have been divested and most of the rest are in the process of being divested. “Of the 29 that are still in the hands of Fisheries and Oceans, we have two,” Purdon said.

Central Frontenac Names Interim CAO

The township of Central Frontenac has announced the upcoming appointment of Steven Silver as interim CAO. The appointment will be formalised at the next meeting of Council. Mayor Janet Gutowski stated: “Given the recent announcement and timing of Larry Donaldson's departure for a position at Tay Valley and the timing of the upcoming municipal election, council wanted to get this announcement out to staff and the public as soon as the arrangements were confirmed.” Mr Silver has broad professional experience. He is retired from the position of CAO of the United Counties of Leeds and Grenville in 2012. In 2011, he was received the Prestige award from the Association of Municpal Managers, Clerks and Treasurers of Ontario in recignition of the work he had done while CAO of Lanark, Leeds and Genville, and earlier of Frontenac County in pre-amalgamation days. He recently served as interim CAO in Bancroft. Residing in Kingston, he has been active with the United Way. His appointment is set to last for six months and among the tasks he will oversee for the newly elected Council which will take office on December 1st will be the hiring of a new CAO and consolidation of the Public Works Department. Mayhor Janet Gutowski and other members of Council have indicated that Kyle Labett, who has been the waste management co-ordinator, will be taking on the Puibcli Works Manager position on an interim basis.

SOUTH FRONTENAC NEWS

Golden Eagles go one and one at the 2014 Bubba Bowl

Golden Eagles go one and one at the 2014 Bubba Bowl

A picturesque setting sun followed by a bright moon made this year’s Bubba Bowl on October 9 one to remember.. The main event was a double header where the Sydenham Golden Eagles took on the LaSalle Knights in two very exciting and close games, one going to Sydenham and the other...

Pleasing art pairings at Sydenham's Grace Centre

Over 30 art lovers gathered at the Southern Frontenac Community Service Corporation’s Grace Centre for a stellar afternoon of great art, both in works and words thanks to two accomplished local artists, Wendy Cain and Margaret Hughes. While their works are in no way similar, hung side by side they represent two very different approaches to art, the results of which are surprisingly complementary. Margaret Hughes, a former potter and co-owner of Cornerstone, Kingston's premiere fine Canadian craft and Inuit art store, took up chalk pastels years ago. Enjoying their directness and rich hues she approaches painting like one would a lump of clay, digging right in and working in a very direct, hands- on way. As a result the works are fresh and vibrant, and burst forth in an explosion of colour. Her past as a potter is literally apparent in her compositions; her colorful functional ceramic pieces are included in many of her still lifes. Hughes creates her paintings by layering colour upon colour, often beginning on a black paper background. By allowing some of the black paper to show through, the colours have an added intensity. Pattern and surface decoration are key in these works, with rich, broad swaths of gorgeous colour lying side by side and portraying various table and wall coverings that boast rich plums, bright oranges, purples, blood reds and deep blacks and blues. These works are reminiscent of other colour and pattern-focused painters like Matisse and Cezanne, both of whom Hughes said are influences. In her talk Hughes spoke of her former work as a potter for 30 years and how working with coloured glazes eventually led her to pastels. “The interaction of having made the pots and then re-presenting them in a two-dimensional form as part of a still life composition presents a stimulating challenge and connects my current practice to my past.” Artist Wendy Cain, a printmaker/papermaker who teaches printmaking at the Ontario College of Art and Design in Toronto and who has participated in over 250 individual and group shows, spoke next. Cain developed her own pulp paper painting technique and currently works out of her studio in Newburg, Ont. Paper and printing making are more process-oriented art forms and Cain's works are crisp, clean and precise, with a certain lightness that makes her pieces appear effortless. In her presentation she demonstrated through slides the processes she uses, and it became clear that each piece involves numerous carefully pre-planned steps. Her most intriguing pieces include her homemade patterned papers, which form the backgrounds of the piece. These beautifully patterned background sections boast mainly fish and natural foliage motifs, on top of which are screen- printed, larger, more central images - things like Grecian urns and other subjects that lend the works a more cerebral quality. Cain likes to play with juxtaposing seemingly unrelated images in a single frame and this is what gives her work its edge. Considering how the images relate is part of the puzzle she seems to offer up to her viewers and as we learned from her talk, her work is always changing and developing. In contrast to these, some of her newest works involve actually using the pulp/paper mixture as paint by spraying it in layers and creating unique landscape pieces where swirling blue skies are often front and centre. The complementary nature of both artists’ work and their talks, which gave additional insight into the minds of these two creative and finely tuned artists, made for a very worth-while visit to the Grace Centre on Thanksgiving weekend. The show will be up until December 12 and many of the works are for sale.

Touring the Universe with Terence Dickinson

There is probably no better guide to lead a tour of the universe than celebrated Canadian astronomer, Terence Dickinson. Dickinson, who resides in Yarker, was invited to Prince Charles PS in Verona by Laurie Swinton, former chair of the parent council, to give an evening talk about the universe on October 2 to listeners of all ages with curious minds. Dickinson, who became fascinated by the stars at age five, has made an admirable career as a renowned astronomer and has authored 15 books on the subject including “Nightwatch: A Practical Guide to Viewing the Universe”, “The Backyard Astronomer’s Guide” and “Exploring the Night Sky”. For years he edited the magazine Astronomy and in 1995 he founded and is still editor of the Canadian astronomy magazine SkyNews. Over his career he has held numerous posts as staff astronomer at such places as the McLaughlin Planetarium in Toronto and was assistant director at the Strasenburgh Planetarium in Rochester, New York. He has won numerous honors and awards including a honorary PhD from the University of Trenton. He was also awarded the Order of Canada and has had an asteroid named after him. However, it is his passion for his subject and his ability to deliver information in understandable terms for all ages that made his appearance at PCPS such a treat. Dickinson used models to demonstrate the magnitude of the universe, inviting one youngster to hold a yellow golf ball representing our sun and inviting another to hold a second white ball representing the next nearest star system, Alpha Centauri. He informed the second youngster that he would have to take his white golf ball all the way to Winnipeg to give a true scale representation of its distance from our sun. Understanding the scope and size of the universe is a daunting task even for the most nimble minded. It is estimated that there are roughly 100 billion galaxies in the universe with each on average having 100 billion stars, which brings the estimated total numbers of stars in the universe to 10,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 stars (or 10 to the power of 22). While listeners were awed by what they heard, Dickinson also accompanied his talk with a slide show of equally awe-inspiring photos. One, a view of the earth as seen from the moon was particularly breathtaking. Following his talk he invited guests to view the moon on what thankfully was a perfectly clear night. He explained that with the strength of present-day telescopes, viewers that night in Verona could actually see the moon as close up as the astronauts who orbited it in space had seen it. He spoke of what a shame it is that in Toronto one cannot view the sky as he was able to as a boy in suburban Toronto so he is glad that in the more northern towns like Verona and those even further north, people are still able to enjoy dark skies and are doing their best to preserve and promote them. Dickinson hopes that his passion might ignite a flame in the young minds of local students and he will be returning to Prince Charles later in October to speak to the students about the subject he loves and knows best. By the way, those who have played the board game Trivial Pursuit have Terrence Dickinson to thank for most of the astronomy questions and answers found there. Photos- 2038-famed Canadian astronomer Terence Dickinson awed listeners at his talk “A Tour of the Universe” at Prince Charles PS in Verona on October 2 2042-a slide in his presentation shows earth as seen from the moon  

New students at Sydenham High School get their colours on at Gould Lake

Grade nine students at Sydenham High School participated in a special school orientation event at the Gould Lake Outdoor Centre on September 25, which geared them up for the school year. Organized by the school’s grade 11 recreational leadership class under the direction of SHS teacher Mark Richards, the event had students don their school colours and participate in a number of games and activities at eight different stations. The activities included potato sack races, tug-of-war and a number of other games. According to Mark Richards the annual event has two key aims. “It provides an opportunity for the grade nine students to get acquainted with their peers while having some fun and also gives the grade 11 students a chance to demonstrate their leadership skills.” The new students learned the SHS school song "Bobaloo", which no doubt will be heard at the annual Bubba Bowl tonight, Thursday, October 9 where Sydenham’s junior and senior Golden Eagles will be taking on the LaSalle Knights. The junior game kicks off at 6pm with the senior game to follow. Admission to the game is $2 and the canteen will be open. Proceeds from admission will be used to cover the cost of the event and to support SHS athletics.

South Frontenac Council

Public Meeting over Condo Application Over 60 people attended a lengthy public meeting to review an application for a plan of condominium development on the northeast shore of Loughborough Lake. One primary concern was the short two-week notice residents had in which to study the related documents and prepare a response: several asked for a second public meeting. Mat Rennie pointed out that at least three of the lots had wetland as their waterfront, asking, “Won’t these people expect to get access to the lake from their property, through these wetlands that are supposed to be protected?” Ed Koen said the monitoring test on his well was done in April, at a time when the well was not connected to his cottage, yet the report referred to fluctuations due to personal consumption: “Why weren’t these tests done in midsummer, when the water levels are at their lowest?” Another speaker begged the Township to stick to their stated goals and Official Plan: “There seems to be a lot of bending and variances to accommodate this development.” Mike Keene, planner for the developer, corrected some issues: ie, the developer will be fully responsible for any alterations to Township roads which are needed to accommodate entrance requirements. He said he would need only two weeks to prepare responses to all other concerns raised in the meeting. In the end, the present Council decided to defer any decision for three months so the incoming Council could deal with it, and recommended a second public meeting so all the residents’ concerns could be fully addressed. Compensation Refused Gail Dickenson, co-owner of Hillside Cafe came a second time to Council requesting compensation for loss of more than $12,000 revenue over the summer months due to construction on Rutledge Road. Council refused on the advice of their lawyer, who said that the Municipal Act forbids granting this form of assistance to commercial enterprise. The chief reason seemed to be fear of setting a precedent for both future and past projects. Naish Resigns Mayor Davison expressed regret over the resignation of Councillor Naish, Storrington district. Naish notified Council that he had moved outside the Township, so was no longer eligible to sit on Council. He will not be replaced, due to the short time left before elections. Long Swamp Bridge The Long Swamp Bridge has been deemed safe enough to be seasonally reopened for the next two years with a 5-Tonne single load limit. Segsworth said a full assessment is planned, to fully evaluate options for rehabilitation, replacement of removal of the bridge. Reduced Speed Limits On the recommendation of the roads department and the Public Services Committee, Council approved a by-law establishing speed restrictions on several roads in the Eastern part of the Township. Museum Support Council gave their approval to the establishment of the “Township of South Frontenac Old Stone School Museum” in Hartington, so the Historical Society can pursue further funding opportunities and partnerships. This approval is subject to being successful with the accessibility grant application. Bubba Bowl this Thursday, Oct 9th. Entry to The Point by foot traffic only.  

FRONTENAC COUNTY NEWS

Idle Land? Plant Trees!

Idle Land? Plant Trees!

by Susan Moore Looking to plant trees on your land? Generous subsidies are available from Trees Ontario. And we supply the planting crew. Planting trees on your property can help fight climate change, increase wildlife habitat and improve water conservation. Trees Ontario is wo...

New federal Liberal candidate elected in LFK

Two Liberal gatherings took place on October 5 in the new federal riding of Lanark Frontenac Kingston to decide which of the two Phils, Phil Somers or Philippe Archambault, would become the new federal Liberal candidate for the riding. Former House leader, Peter Milliken, chaired both meetings, the first at Sydenham's Grace Centre and the second at the Perth Civitan Hall, where each of the two candidates gave their final speeches leading up the vote. At 5:30pm after the total of 222 ballots had been counted, both candidates were called outside of main hall at the Civitan hall in Perth and minutes later both re-entered, one with both arms raised above his head, celebrating his victory. Philippe Archambault was invited to the podium first to make his victory speech and after first thanking his wife Melanie, his team, supporters and his fellow candidate Phil Somers, he reiterated much from his earlier speeches in the day. Archambault emphasized the need in moving forward to work together to make progress in a number of areas, including increasing employment opportunities, creating more housing and health care initiatives, increasing support for elders living at home, protection of the environment, and creating more opportunities for youth and young adults. He ended by stressing the need for members of the party to come together to create a single united front. “Scott Reid will not be easy to get out in 2015 and we will need to use the newest technology and to reach out to younger voters. I think it is very feasible that we can win this riding. We have a great leader in Justin (Trudeau). We will build a great team and we will work hard together and I promise that I will do everything I can to beat Scott Reid in the next election,” Archambault said, to much applause. Phil Somers spoke next and thanked his family, his team and supporters. He congratulated Archambault for conducting such a “strong and positive campaign”. Somers geared his campaign to what he described as the issues that matter most to people in this riding, namely restoring democracy in Ottawa and said he enjoyed his campaign experience. He encouraged all of his volunteers and supporters to “get behind Archambault in order to win the riding in the 2015 election”. He spoke of the importance of signing up new party members as soon as possible and said that he is “so passionate about getting Stephen Harper out of Ottawa that he will continue to work hard to win this riding for the Liberals.” Following the announcement of his win, Archambault told me he felt that it was a tight race and that the vote could have gone either way. “I definitely know that I came from behind since I entered the race in February whereas Phil Somers had a two-year head start on me. Still, that being said, I had a good feeling from the start and knew that I had support and know that I worked hard for this.” Archambault said he feels confident about winning the riding in the upcoming 2015 federal election. “This is just the beginning. If we work hard and talk to people and put out the Liberal message I think that we will have a good chance to beat Scott Reid, who has been the MP is this riding for the last 14 years.” As far as celebrating his win, Archambault said that he would heading home, would talk with his wife and would be getting up early to make lunches for his young children. Basically he said he “would be getting back into the family routine and working full time”.

Province lowers the boom, announces OPP costs.

The townships of Addington Highlands, North Frontenac, and Central Frontenac have received their 2015 invoices for policing, and the news is not good. Each of the townships will see an increase of $40 per household in 2015, the maximum increase that is allowed per year under the new formula. In Addington Highlands, where there are 2,763 dwellings, that amounts to an increase of $110,000. The township paid $515,409 to the OPP this year, and will pay $625,000 next year. But that is not the end of it; the costs will increase by another $110,000 in 2016, and a further $27,000 in 2017 when the township will reach its target cost of $766,317, a 50% increase over the 2014 cost. The News is worse in North Frontenac, partly because the old model was very kind to North Frontenac. In 2014 the township paid only $230,000 to the OPP, less than half of the amount paid by Addington Highlands even though there are substantially more households in North Frontenac. Controversially, households include seasonal residences, leaving North Frontenac with 3,464 households. Based on the $40 per year increase cap, the cost to North Frontenac will go up by $139,000 to $370,000. But it does not end there. The cost will increase by $139,000 each year for three more years, and in the fifth year, 2019, it will go up a further $58,000. By the end of the entire phase in, North Frontenac ratepayers will be paying $845,000 for policing, an increase of $615,000 over 2014, or more than 300 per cent. In Central Frontenac, which has 4008 dwellings, the $40 capped increase means the cost will go up by $160,000. The township paid $787,000 in 2014, and will pay $948,000 next year. The price will go up by $40 per year for another 2 years and by 2017 it will cost $1,270,000, a $483,000 annual increase for 3 years, or 60%. The average ratepayer in Addington Highlands will see a $40 increase in both 2015 and 2016 and a $10 increase in 2017. The average ratepayer in North Frontenac will see a $40 increase in 2015, 2016, 2017 and 2018, and a further $17 increase in 2019. What do all these numbers mean? Taxes are going up.

Three FPS Paramedics recognized by Ontario Association of Paramedic Chiefs

In a formal ceremony at last week’s Ontario Association of Paramedic Chiefs’ Awards Gala, two Frontenac Paramedic Service paramedics received the Governor General’s Emergency Medical Services Exemplary Service Medal, and a third received the McNally Award of Bravery. “I am very proud of our paramedics who work every day to keep us safe, and continue do so in a manner that warrants such prestigious acknowledgement,” says Denis Doyle, County of Frontenac Warden. “I encourage the citizens of the City of Kingston and Frontenac County to express gratitude to all of our dedicated paramedics for their commendable service.” Major General Richard Rohmer presented Exemplary Service Medals to paramedics Marc Lawler (for 30 years of service) and Richard Russell (for 20 years of service), for performing services to the public in an exemplary manner, characterized by the highest standards of good conduct, industry and efficiency. County of Middlesex Warden Joanne Vanderheyden, OAPC President Norm Gale and Keith McNally, son of Dr. Norman McNally presented the McNally Award of Bravery to FPS paramedic Joe Ferguson. The McNally Award recognizes acts of conspicuous bravery by paramedics in the performance of their duties. It was established in 1976 to honour its namesake who many consider the “father” of the Ontario ambulance system. Joe received the award for his actions during a call he attended on December 4, 2013 where a car went into the side of a house, coming to rest on a natural gas meter and creating a major gas leak. Combining factors meant there was high potential for an explosion, and the driver was trapped in the car. Without regard for his own safety, Joe pulled the driver over the gear shift, out the passenger side door and dragged him twenty feet to safety, where he began to perform emergency medical treatment. Major-General Richard Rohmer is Canada's most decorated citizen and the Honourary Chief of the Ontario Association of Paramedic Chiefs.

Frontenac County Disability Access Award

The County of Frontenac will accept nominations for the 2014 International Day of Persons with Disabilities Access Award until October 30, 2014. Community members are encouraged to nominate those individuals and organizations in the Frontenacs who are going above and beyond to help enable persons with disabilities equal access to opportunities within the County. “Eliminating barriers and promoting inclusion is crucial to building resilient communities,” says Denis Doyle, Deputy Warden of the County of Frontenac. “This award helps bring awareness to accessibility issues across the County and celebrates the forward-thinking people and organizations who are making important, tangible differences every day.” The County, in partnership with the Frontenac Accessibility Advisory Committee (FAAC), created this award in 2013 to recognize persons, groups or organizations that have made or are making a significant contribution beyond legislated requirements, towards improving access for persons with disabilities in the County of Frontenac. Improving Access can include the design of new or renovated buildings, an employment program, a transportation system, a recreational or leisure program, or anything that contributes significantly to persons with disabilities living independently. Nomination forms can be found at www.frontenaccounty.ca and can be submitted at the County Administration Office or at any Township Administration Office. The winner will be announced at December’s County Council meeting with a luncheon to follow. For more information about this award, visit www.frontenaccounty.ca or contact Jannette Amini, Manager of Legislative Services/Clerk at 613-548-9400 ext. 302 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

ADDINGTON HIGHLANDS NEWS

Trick or Eat!

Trick or Eat!

Submitted by NAEC The students of North Addington Education Centre will be suiting up in their Campbell’s Soup costumes on October 31 and knocking on your door! They will be asking for non-perishable food items which will be donated to the local food bank, which is experiencing ...

Community Support Services integral to keeping people at home

By Ontario Community Support Association (OCSA) and Sonja Alcock October is Community Support Month. This is intended to increase awareness and celebrate the achievements of what community support services are and why they are an important part of the health care system. Home and Community Services are critical in helping family caregivers and supporting seniors and persons with physical disabilities to remain in their homes. Land O’ Lakes Community Services (LOLCS) in Northbrook is one of 600 agencies in this province alone, which provides a wide variety of services such as adult day programs, Meals on Wheels, transportation to medical appointments, Home Care, Diners’ Club/Congregate Dining programs, caregiver support services; Diners’ Club; Home Help/Homemaking. The inability to keep up with the growing health budget is a concern for government and Ontarians alike; by supporting a strong and robust home and community care sector, the government gets better value for the dollars they spend. Home and community support services such as Land O’ Lakes Community Services are the key to a sustainable healthcare system. Community Support agencies are working with their partners: the Local Health Integration Networks (LHIN), Community Care Access Centres (CCAC) and other health care providers to integrate care for Ontarians. Their services help alleviate backlogs in emergency rooms and get people out of hospital beds and back home with programs that help them manage their chronic diseases, and reduce demand on long-term care homes and acute care health services. Basic Facts about Home and Community Support agencies: They work to strengthen and promote home and community support as the foundation of a sustainable health care system. There are over 600 community based organizations providing services…which include over 25,000 paid staff…and 100,000 volunteers across Ontario! These agencies are community governed and not-for-profit; many are charities like LOLCS. This means that when surpluses occur they are reinvested back into services/programs for clients. In addition to program funding from the Ministry of Health and Long Term Care, our agencies also fundraise in the community and often charge low client fees for some services to help offset what is not covered by the government funding and fundraising efforts. Home and community health service providers deliver compassionate, cost effective health and home care to one million Ontarians per year. These services support people to live independently in their own home, thereby delaying or avoiding the need for long-term care or reducing the need for more expensive health services such as hospital care. Thus improving their quality of life. Most, if not all, these agencies would not function at all without the many volunteers that willingly give of their time, talent, and trust to help those in their community. The population is aging and the prevalence of chronic conditions and disabilities is on the rise. Ontario’s senior population is expected to double in the next 15 years. Almost 80% of Ontarians over the age of 45 have a chronic condition, and of those, about 70% suffer from two or more chronic conditions. And persons with disabilities develop age-related diseases much earlier than the general population – at 50 years of age. They also have much higher incidents of chronic diseases. On a happy note: the quality of life is improved when individuals can receive a range of personal and medical care services at home and in their community. The impact of community support and supportive housing on clients has been researched in Ontario [Lun, Simonne, & Williams, 2005]. Some of the indicators arising from that research include: reduction of emergency department visits; reduction of 911 calls; reduction of caregiver burden; improved mental well-being [peace of mind]; increase in personal perception of health and social connectedness.

Addington Highlands: Fire Prevention Week

Addington Highlands Township Reeve Henry Hogg would like everyone to have a fire safe year. He encourages everyone to test their smoke alarms monthly and replace the batteries at least once a year or more often if the “low battery” chirps. Every year people die needlessly in home fires as a result of no smoke alarm or smoke alarms not working due to batteries being dead or removed. Reeve Hogg says “we need to change this by installing, maintaining and testing our smoke alarms”. Ontario law requires there must be at least one working smoke alarm on every level of a dwelling and outside all sleeping areas. Please note “dwelling” can be a home, cottage, hunt camp or camper trailer. In 35% of Ontario’s fatal residential fires there was no working smoke alarm, in 41% of those fires there was no battery in the smoke alarm or the battery was dead. Working smoke alarms increase your chance of surviving a home fire by up to 50%. Just like milk or bread, smoke alarms have an expiry date. Smoke alarms should be replaced after 10 years. There will be an expiry date on your smoke alarm. All families should have a home escape plan with two ways out and practice it with the whole family. Your home escape plan should have a meeting place that everyone knows, a safe distance from the building. You may have less than three minutes to get out before the house becomes unsafe. If you have any smoke alarm or fire safety questions please contact your local fire department.

LOLTA seeks new members

by Lucas Wales For over 70 years the Land O’ Lakes Tourist Association (LOLTA) has been working to add value to our region of Ontario, to create a sense of place, and to establish the small rural communities within it as a destination. The association is one of the best shared services that our local municipalities and business owners make an investment in each year. General Manager of LOLTA, Lucas Wales, says the association has been doing a great job in terms of marketing the area over the short term, but it is time to start looking at some of the bigger picture items that need to be addressed. “Our region’s growth rates are not flattering to the long term sustainability of our small communities. Without the means for proper investment we are going to be facing some major challenges within the next decade. If we are unable to invest in the infrastructure that is crucial to growth, we will remain stagnate; that hurts our communities, but it also hurts our tourism industry...We need to continue to focus our efforts on bringing people here from Kingston, Ottawa, and Toronto, but what is critical is that while we have them here we are making a sales pitch as to why they should retire or start a business here. That can be either formal, or informal through projects like community improvements plans and beautification projects which many communities have begun undertaking.” For those who already own a business one of the most important marketing connections they can make is with the Land O’ Lakes. “Each year we print 70,000 tourist information maps for the region that go all over the province, including inside the region as well at local gas stations, accommodations, restaurants, tourism centres, in outdoor boxes, and countless other locations. If you run any type of business that is tourism-related, you need to get yourself listed on our map and on our website. We currently have about 180 businesses who are members of the association, but there are so many more out there with whom we still need to connect.” According to a recent report from RTO 11, tourism is a $440 million industry in Ontario’s Highlands alone every year. Our job is to connect as many of those dollars being spent within the industry with our piece of Ontario here in the Land O’ Lakes. This summer our social media outlets were driving our focus on our small festivals and events, which create a huge economic stimulus within our communities. Next year we will publish our first ever festivals and events map for the region, highlighting exactly what is going on, where, and when to connect visitors with an added incentive to visit our communities. We will also be focusing on driving tourism to our trails systems as we move into 2015. With winter quickly approaching we are building a relationship with the OFSC to draw on Snowmobile Tourism into our region. We will be working with our accommodators to highlight which businesses remain open in the winter months, and how we can connect snowmobilers with their businesses. Anyone wishing to become a member of LOLTA, please contact Lucas Wales at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., or call 613-336-8818 to find out more information about the benefits of membership.

The History of Meals On Wheels

By Sonja Alcock (referenced from Wikipedia)   It all really started during WWII in England during the “Blitz”, the bombing of the UK by German forces, which destroyed the homes of many people. Therefore they were unable to cook meals on their own. A group of ladies from the Women’s Volunteer Service (WVS) provided and delivered food for those who were unable to provide for themselves. The name “Meals on Wheels” came about by the WVS bringing meals to servicemen.   The first home delivery during the war was made in Hertfordshire, England in 1943!! Baby prams were “the wheels” and straw bales or felt hats were used to keep the meals warm during delivery. Eventually the news of what the WVS ladies' “Meals on Wheels” program spread around the world. The program began in Australia in 1952 where the meals were delivered via a tricycle by one lady, until the Red Cross stepped in to help.   In 1954 the first home-delivered meal began in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States. Here most of the volunteers were teens and they were given the nickname “Platter Angels”. These teens would cook, pack and deliver the meals to elderly and disabled people in their town.   Eventually it spread across the nation so the organization, “Meals on Wheels Association of America” was established.   In 1963, 20 years after the war, seniors in Brampton, Ontario were the first to receive their meals in Canada!! Brampton Meals on Wheels started with delivering six meals a day!!   Seventy-one years later the delivery of meals is completely different, but the concept is still the same. Meals, either hot or frozen are prepared by volunteers and delivered to shut ins, seniors, and disabled people all across the land. The program has gone from delivering meals by prams and tricycles to cars; from keeping the food warm by using straw bales to modern containers that keep the food fresh and hot in one, or cool and frozen in another.   It has gone from just providing meals to providing companionship as well. Often the only person a senior may see for that day is the one who is delivering them a meal. Depending on the program, some volunteers are paid to drive, but most is done by volunteers. Within each volunteer is a heart for the person to whom they are delivering the meal. They are often the ears and eyes that check on the health and safety of each client, so it goes deeper than just providing a meal; it’s also about providing friendship, support, and care.   Here in the Land O’ Lakes area, Land O’ Lakes Community Services is one of those caring providers who have been running the Meals on Wheels program ever since 1997. There are 20 volunteers, from cooks, to drivers providing between 40 to 50 meals per week for about 36 to 40 seniors in our area. (This data will vary from week to week).   And to add to our little history lesson about Meals on Wheels, it goes in a full circle. When it first started during the second war, meals were delivered to servicemen. Today one of our delivery volunteers is a retired serviceman!! So when he comes to your door give him a hug for his service to our country, and to our community.   If you are interested in getting Meals On Wheels for yourself or a family member please do not hesitate to call Marlene Dacuk at Land O’ Lakes Community Services at 613-336-8934 ext 233; by email at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. The service is for seniors 55 and over, persons recovering from illness, surgery or with physical disabilities. Clients can order a hot meal that is delivered every Thursday. Meals in the south are prepared at Barrie Hall or Kaladar hall by volunteer cooks. The cost is $6 - Northbrook, Cloyne, Flinton, Kaladar, Denbigh      

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