Featured News

New public works manager is “a big roads guy”

New public works manager is “a big roads guy”

With 25 years experience working on roads crews, new Central Frontenac Public Works Manager Brad Thake hopes to be a “voice of reason” and provide the same sort of stability in the position that his p...

...

Electoral systems, federal debt subjects of discussion evening

Electoral systems, federal debt subjects of discussion evening

“The closer you come to true proportionality, the more complex it becomes,” speaker Norm Hart told a discussion group gathered in Sharbot Lake’s Oso Hall last week. “(So) you can never achieve true pr...

...

Stuff The Cruiser campaign gives food bank “a presence”

Stuff The Cruiser campaign gives food bank “a presence”

For many years now, food bank volunteers have been joined by OPP auxiliary members and it’s been a mutually beneficial arrangement. In Sydenham, Verona and Sharbot Lake (like last Saturday), auxiliar...

...

5 Star Farm draws an Easter Crowd

5 Star Farm draws an Easter Crowd

5 star farm is located on Scanlan Road, and is easy to reach from either Road 38 or the Village of Sydenham. Curtis and Tracy, who run the farm with help from their children, bought the property in 20...

...

Unanswered questions in the Srigley case

Unanswered questions in the Srigley case

Written By: Jeff Green | Published: April-19-2017 | Category: Editorials
Tagged Under: OPP, People

It’s been almost 4 years since Bob Srigley was shot by police on the porch of his trailer on Arden Road. We know a few things about what happened, but only a few. He was armed with what the Special I...

...

Secure funding for Paramedicine program

Frontenac Paramedic services took some initiative a few years ago establishing paramedicine services...

Firearms stolen in South Frontenac

The Frontenac Ontario Provincial Police (OPP) is investigating a break and enter that occurred at a ...

Desert Lake Resort noise exemption granted limited one-year trial

South Frontenac Council granted Desert Lake Resort an exemption from its noise bylaw that will allow...

Perth Festival of the Maples Celebrates 41st Year: April 29th

The annual Perth Festival of the Maples has been a welcome rite of spring since 1976. As the festiva...

School Project Connects Generations

Elinor Rush, in her role as fibre artist in Loughborough Public School, shows grade one and two stud...

Accommodations in Frontenac

The County of Frontenac is looking for input from residents and businesses as it’s trying to find wa...

Training course at Shabot Obaadjiwan office

A construction worker training course co-sponsored by the St. Lawrence College Employment Centre in ...

Brad Barbeau joins SF Council

In January, South Frontenac Council invited Harrowsmith resident Brad Barbeau to fill the vacancy on...

Big Pot, and big taxes, will rule the day

When I plant a garden each year, I am free to grow as much lettuce, peppers, tomatoes, squash, peas,...

Off to deliver hot lunches in the rain

Some senior residents of Southern Frontenac were delighted and surprised a week ago Tuesday (April 4...

50 STORIES 150 YEARS

Virgil Garrett: A Salute to a Teacher and Beekeeper

Virgil Garrett: A Salute to a Teacher and Beekeeper

Q. What do grandfather clocks and bees have in common? A. Virgil Garrett This past summer there was a construction project on Road 38 at the northern edge of the village of Sharbot Lake. For a time there was a stoplight for southbound traffic in front of Virgil and Beryl Garret...

Wolfe Island Past and Present – as of 1973

In 1973, Winston Cosgrove published a 60-page book on the history of Wolfe Island. Wolfe Island Past and Present outlines how the island came to be settled, how it remained in use by indigenous peoples as fall and winter fishing and hunting grounds until the middle of the 19th Century, and how the population peaked in the late 19th Century before beginning a long decline that has only recently been reversed. The book is written in a kind of discreet manner that suggests its focus was more in the past than on what was then the present, and of course 40 years have passed since it was published. It contains, however, much information about how the island community developed from the late 17th until the 20th centuries. In 1685, Robert Cavallier, Sieur de Lasalle, having been granted the Signeury of Fort Frontenac by King Louis the 14th ten years earlier, conferred ownership of what would become known as Wolfe Island on James Cauchois. It was the “first conveyance of any part of Ontario from one subject to another”. The land remained in the Cauchois family for over 100 years, until it was sold in the early 1800s to David Alexander Grant and Patrick Langan for one shilling an acre. Grant had married the Baroness of Longeuil in 1785, and although the sale of the island to Grant and Langan severed all ties to the French monarchy it did establish the Baron of Longeuil as a major force on Wolfe Island. In 1823, David Alexander's son, C.W. Grant, the 4th Baron of Longeuil, owned about 11,000 acres on the island. A similar amount was split among the three daughters of Patrick Langan. Two-sevenths of the land had been turned over to England's King George when the British overturned French rule in the entire region. Grant sold off 100 acre lots starting in 1823, and settlement began in earnest. He also had a large house constructed near Marysville. The house, which was called Ardath Chateau, was known locally as the “The Old Castle”. It had 25 rooms, a dungeon, a carriage house and servants' quarters and was the “focal point for many years of life on the island”. In 1929 the house, which had been unoccupied for at least 15 years, was razed in a fire. “Being a native born Islander, this writer recognises the staunch loyalty among the Islanders for one another and out of respect for this tradition, would prefer 'to let sleeping dogs lie' rather than delve further into the matter.” This suggests that Winston Cosgrove knew more about the fire than he was willing to say, and in all likelihood further information about what happened that dark night in 1929 is still carried by any number of Wolfe “Islanders”. Although “The Old Castle” was certainly grand, the housing situation for Wolfe Island settlers in the early to mid 19th Century was more modest. Fifteen settler families lived on the island in 1823, and this increased to 261 persons by 1826. The population grew steadily, peaking at 3,600 by 1861. When the island was being settled in the 1820s and 30s “the typical house was a log cabin, 20 feet long by 16 feet wide, 6 logs high, with a shanty or sloping roof. Some had glass but most often the windows were only holes in the wall, which could be covered in the winter.” During the 1850s, demand for lumber for D. D. Calvin's shipbuilding operation on nearby Garden Island led to a lumbering boom on Wolfe Island, and the boom ended when the trees were gone. The population began to dwindle at that point, and by the time Cosgrove's book was published in 1973, it was down to 1,200. It had dropped to 1142 by 2001, and the 2011 population survey lists Frontenac Islands (including Wolfe and Howe Island) at 1864. The current permanent resident population of Wolfe Islands, according to Wikipedia, is 1,400, although it is twice that or more in the summer (perhaps excluding this past summer due to the Ferry Fiasco of 2015). Wolfe Island Past and Present contains a wealth of information about landmarks and renowned island residents. It explains how Marysville was named after Mary Hitchcock, who lived all of her 92 years on the island and was its first postmistress between 1845 and her death in 1877. The General Wolfe Hotel, originally known as the Wolfe Island Hotel, was built in 1860. It was renamed the General Wolfe by the Greenwood brothers in 1955, and benefited from the results of a liquor referendum in 1957, which was won by “the wets”. The hotel remains an island landmark and a major part of the hospitality industry. It's 130-seat restaurant has won a number of provincial awards. The final chapter of the book deals with a crucial subject, one that has been top of mind on the island this summer and was also the subject of a discussion and slide show on Wednesday, December 2, “Ice Travel” with Kaye Fawcett and Ken White, which was organised by the Wolfe Island Historical Society. Throughout Frontenac County the history of road and railway construction is full of colour, hardship and a fair taint of corruption and scandal. On Wolfe Island there is an added dimension - the water that separates the island from the mainland and the City of Kingston. It was 50 years ago, in 1965, that a year-round ferry service financed by the Province of Ontario was established on Wolfe Island. Until then the ferry service ran only until freeze up, and during the winter an ice road was the way across. In 1954 the winter was so warm that the ferry was only inactive for 2 days, but between 1955 and the onset of the year-round ferry in 1965, the range was 60 to 110 days, with an average of about 80 inactive days each winter. Over the years, tragedies and near tragedies occurred on the ice on many occasions. One of the more famous events was the near drowning of entire families on Christmas Day in 1955. The ferry was out of commission because of an early winter, but a tug boat, the Salvage Prince, waited at the edge of the ice at Barrett's Bay for families who had come to the island for Christmas Day and were returning to Kingston late in the afternoon. They were being drawn across the ice in a sleigh, but just before reaching the boat, the sleigh went through a wet spot in the ice, forcing a hurried and dangerous rescue, as children, adults and seniors, were luckily all pulled out of the freezing water back to the tug and a boat ride to Kingston. Some were taken to the hospital for observation. An account of the trip by Brian Johnson is available at thousandislandslife.com. In the concluding pages of his book, Winston Cosgrove makes the argument that the economy of Wolfe Island will be doomed unless a bridge is built. “In the past the economy of the island has been purely an agricultural one, with hunting and fishing and summer residents as minor items. Under this system the population has dwindled. The key to the problem is transportation. There is much beautiful undeveloped shoreline and land that is is well-suited for permanent homes but better ways are needed to get to and from the mainland if the community is to develop and grow. A ferry service is not efficient enough ... Meanwhile the Islanders who want a bridge must be content to await future developments while acting as guardians of a great land developed by pioneers, to whom all are indebted.” Although Cosgrove's views may have had a lot of currency this past summer while the Wolfe Islander ferry was in dry dock, Wolfe Island has reversed the population slide over the past 10 years and a number of tourism-related businesses are thriving.

Frontenac Provincial Park: from mica mines to trails

Rightly so, Frontenac Park is considered the hidden jewel of Frontenac County. It is located in the midst of an array of communities and cottage lakes within a stone's throw of Sydenham and is a short drive from Kingston; and yet it is a backwoods park in a unique geological and climactic location. It features the best canoeing, camping and hiking this side of Bon Echo Park, which is also a jewel but one that is less hidden and is also shared between Frontenac and Lennox and Addington. In his definitive book on the back story about the land where Frontenac Park is located, “Their Enduring Spirit: the History of Frontenac Park 1783-1990”, Christian Barber extensively researched all of the development that took place in and around the park before the idea of a park was floated and eventually acted upon in the 1960s. Their Enduring Spirit is not only a valuable resource in terms of how the park was developed; it is also an account of the difficulties posed by the Frontenac Spur of the Canadian Shield on those who were unlucky enough to attempt homesteading in its rocky terrain. The park is located in what were then Loughborough and Bedford Townships, now both part of the Municipality of South Frontenac. Many of the settlers who attempted to make a life in that region did so in the mid-to-late 1800s. There were some Loyalists among them, but there were also a number of Irish immigrants who made their way first to St. Patrick's Church in Railton, and then headed into the wilderness north of Sydenham in search of a new life. What greeted them was brutal and difficult. The history of a number of homesteading families forms the core of Their Enduring Spirit. Based on historic records, interviews with descendants who lived on or visited those who lived on the farms, and by walking the land and examining the remnants that are being reclaimed as wilderness lands, a picture of life in the back townships during the first 100 years of Frontenac County emerges. (An account of the life and times of the Kemp family can be found at Frontenacnews.ca under the “50 Stories/150 Years” tab) The level of poverty among late 19th Century settlers is reflected in some of the minutes of meetings of both Hinchinbrooke and Loughbrough Townships. In the minutes there are accounts of grants for as little as $1 for families in need after the death of a partner or a debilitating illness. Families who had settled on the worst pieces of land, who suffered from any kind of ill health, or for some reason were not able to keep up with the demands of clearing land, building shelter, keeping warm in winter and raising enough food, ended up in desperate straits. That is why settlers would take over abandoned fields and houses and only settle the ownership later on, if they decided to stay. Far from disputing this practice, as long as the property taxes were paid the local townships did not question the ownership of the properties. Mining was one of the few means of getting money for labour, and was also a major impetus for the establishment of the K&P Railroad. The village of Godfrey, to the west of Frontenac Park, was originally called Deniston after the name of the post office but it was known as Iron Ore Junction by the local population. The Glendower company mined 12,000 tons of iron ore between 1873 and 1880, and later the Zanesville company took over and a spur line was constructed between the mine and the Bedford Station (renamed Godfrey in 1901) of the K&P. A large deposit of Feldspar was found between Desert and Thirteen Island Lakes, and it was mined, on and off, between 1901 and 1951, producing a total of 230,000 tons in that time. In and right around the park, it was mica that was the most commonly mined mineral, in small mines as a kind of cottage industry and on an industrial scale as well. There is an account of how a mica mine operated in one of the issues of “The Frontenac News” (not this newspaper but the newsletter of the Friends of Frontenac Park) Below is an excerpt: 1905 - early in the morning Tom Gorsline, the foreman at the Tett mine, is checking the steam piping as a worker starts a wood fire in the boiler that will provide the steam that runs the drill and the water pumps. The miners had been following a vein of amber mica (phlogopite) since 1899 - the main pit now plunged close to 80 feet into the rocks and water sometimes was a problem. Fortunately, the price for mica is on the rise again and the main vein is still good. The hand drillers are already at work. Their job is to make holes in the rock to receive the explosives. The drillers are working in teams of two using a method called "double-jacking". One person, the holder, manually holds a steel drill against the rock. The other, the striker, swings an eight-pound sledgehammer hitting the end of the drill. In between the blow, the holder twists the drill to loosen the rock chips so it does not get stuck in the rock. Then the next blow comes with a sharp clank when steel meets steel. They are drilling at a rate of 1.5 to 2 feet per hour. After a half-hour, the holder and striker exchange places so the striker can have a rest. As you can imagine, accuracy is crucial. If the striker misses, the holder could be maimed for life. This is dangerous enough when they are drilling on the floor of the mine, but often the veins are at the roof of a drift or on the wall of the pit. As soon as the steam from the boiler reaches the right pressure, a miner starts the steam drill. It is faster and easier than hand drilling but the steam drill is enormous, unreliable and unwieldy because of connections with the steam pipes that come down from the surface. As a result, the steam driller is assigned fairly open spaces while the hand drillers work in tight quarters. Drilling is hard and dangerous - there are no hard hats, goggles, or electrical lights - but the dollar a day they are earning helps to feed their families. Now that the holes are in place, Tom calls the blasters. They make sure the holes are dry, otherwise the charges may not go off. They put the black powder in waterproof covers, attach a proper length fuse, and place it down in the hole. They pack the rest of the hole with clay. The length of the fuse is important or they could meet their maker faster than expected. After a few minutes, all charges are ready. The head blaster gives a signal to Tom Gorsline who orders all miners and equipment out of from the mine. When all is clear, the blaster lights up the fuse and moves quickly out of the way. The explosion rumbles and the ground shakes. After the smoke and dust settle, Tom sends in the muckers. They have a hazardous job. Everyone knew of George Amey, a mucker at the Birch Lake mine, who lost an eye when his pick hit a charge that did not fully explode. Some muckers sort the ore from the waste while others, with picks and shovels, load the waste rock in a large bucket until it is full. Then one of them yells: "BUCKET." Upon hearing the signal, a man at the surface gets the horse moving on a circular track so that the winch can hoist the bucket up to the top. The bucket is dumped on the tailings pile. As soon as the muckers are finished clearing the debris from the last blast, the drillers begin to make new holes. Cleaning the mica is the job of cobblers who work on the surface. Some cobblers "thumb trim" the mica by the pit while others are working at the cleaning shop attached to the main mine building, "knife trimming" the mica to remove all traces of unwanted material. They store the clean mica in barrels. The mica is shipped down the Hardwood Bay Road to Perth Road then north to Bedford Mills. There, the mica will be shipped to a buyer in Ottawa via the Rideau Canal. The Tett mine operated from 1899 till 1924. It produced 99 tons of mica for a value of $27,279.00. For a few months, it was the largest mica producer in Ontario. By the 1940s the mica mining boom had passed and most of the homesteads in the area had been abandoned or were on their last legs. It was then that the idea of establishing a wilderness park on the lands in Loughborough and Bedford township that had resisted settlement, and whose lakes (Devil, Big Clear, Otter, and Buck) were not already cut up into cottage lots, was first floated. In 1954 a Parks Division was created within the Department of Lands and Forests of Ontario (the precursor to the Ministry of Natural Resources. In 1957, the Kingston Rod and Gun Club submitted a proposal for a new park to serve the growing numbers of people in Kingston and southern Frontenac County wanting to experience the great outdoors, hiking, camping, fishing and the enjoyment of a sandy beach. The proposal included twenty-seven 200 acre lots in Bedford and twenty-five 200 acre lots in Lougborough, a total of 16.2 square miles, with an option to increase it to 23.7 square miles if the area below Otter Lake was added. That effort was not successful, and seemed to be dead when Murphy's Point Park on Big Rideau Lake near Perth was established instead. Five years later, in 1962, another group, the Kingston Nature Club, put forward a similar proposal. This time, even though the cost of purchasing private land for the park had ballooned to $200,000, the proposal was successful. It eventually cost over $1 million to create Frontenac Park, which opened in the late 1960s. The park's first superintendent, Bruce Page, was the great grandson of Jeremiah, one of the first settlers on the land in the vicinity of what became Frontenac Park. Among the features of the park, and on the nearby Gould Lake Conservation Area, are hiking trails that pass by and over mica mine sites. In the Park, the 10 km Tettsmine Loop passes by remnants of a log slide from the lumbering days, abandoned mica mines and the remains of McNally Homestead. At Gould Lake, the Mica Loop passes over several small mine sites and mica minerals can still be seen sparkling in the rock faces.  

First Frontenac County warden from Wolfe Island

There were a number of distinguished Frontenac County wardens from the Township of Wolfe Island during the first 133 years of Frontenac County history, and since municipal amalgamation there have been two more from the Township of Frontenac Islands: Jim Vanden Hoek for two years, and the current warden, Denis Doyle. Although Tim O'Shea was only county warden for a single year, the centennial year in 1967, he was a member of the council for 33 consecutive years as the long-serving reeve of Wolfe Island. He retired from politics in 1991 and died in 1996 at the age of 78. His son, Terry, who served as the clerk of Wolfe Island and Frontenac Islands for over 20 years, starting in 1986, described his father as someone who enjoyed people and was able to remain calm in tense situations, which might explain why he was able to win election after election. He worked for most of his life as a hunting and a fishing guide on Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence River, and in the evenings he tended to township matters. As well as presiding over Council, he was the welfare officer for the islands as well as the manager of the ferry, all part of the functions of the reeve. Perhaps his most lasting accomplishment was convincing the provincial government to take over the ferry service from Wolfe Island and make it a free service. He also presided over the construction of the first library, medical clinic, ambulance base and fire department on the island. Because of all his accomplishments and longevity, he is still considered to have been the dean of Frontenac County councilors. One hundred and two years before Tim O'Shea served as county warden, another Wolfe Island politician held the post. The first ever Frontenac County warden was Dileno (Dexter) Calvin, the proverbial self-made man. He was orphaned at the age of eight in Rutland, Vermont. When he was 20 he moved to the State of New York where he worked as a labourer until he entered into the lumbering business when he was in his mid-20s. He started in 1825, squaring some timber with a neighbour and transporting it by raft to Quebec City. Slowly, he built up the business, and in 1835 he moved to Clayton, NY, and established a lumber transport business. Soon after, he became involved in a company based on Garden Islands, the Kingston Stave Forwarding Company, which was later renamed Calvin, Cook and Counter, and then Calvin and Cook after the men who owned it. In 1844, Dexter Calvin moved to rented land on Garden Island and took control of the company, taking advantage of the island's location, its sheltered port, and the fact that it was within the British rather than the American trading system. Out of its base on Garden Island, the company maintained agencies in Sault St. Marie, Quebec City, Liverpool and Glasgow, operated 12 -15 ships and employed as many as 700 people in its peak years. It became a generalized shipping company, and also operated a large tugboat service. The move to Garden Island took place soon after the death of Calvin's first wife, Harriet Webb, in Clayton, New York, in 1843. the couple had been married for 12 years and had six children. He remarried Marion Breck in 1844. They also had six children between 1844 and her death in 1861. His third wife, Catherine Wilkinson, whom he married in 1861 when he was 63, had two children, and lived until 1911. Of his 14 children, only six lived to adulthood. During the last 40 years of his long life (he died in 1884 at the age of 86) Calvin was a sort of patriarch to the inhabitants of Garden Island. He bought 15 acres of land on the island in 1848 with his partner Hiram Cook, and by 1862 they owned the entire island. Calvin bought Cook’s share in 1880. Garden Island became a model company town, with its own school, library, and post office. Although it was made up of people from different national origins and religions, it was reportedly remarkably peaceful and well managed. It was also a dry community, under the express orders of Calvin himself, who became a prohibitionist at the same time as his conversion to the Baptist Faith about a year before the death of his first wife. Since most of the inhabitants of Garden Island worked for Calvin, he was able to shield them from economic turbulence in two ways. For one thing, since he was more involved in lumber transport than buying and selling, the fluctuations in the price of lumber did not affect the business in a substantial way. He also chose to use the company's reserves to shield his employees during serious downturns, such as one that took place in 1873. At that time he cut wages but did not lay any one off, which was as unusual then as it is now. He was strongly opposed to organized labour, however, and when sailors on his ships started a union drive, he hired replacement workers from Glasgow and eventually sold some of his schooners and bought great lake barges to cut down on the need for labour. His political life, which began when he was in his early 60s, was quite distinguished. He had become a naturalized Canadian within a year of moving to Garden Island. By the time Frontenac County was established in 1865 after the amalgamated County of Frontenac, Lennox and Addington had been disbanded, Calvin was already ensconced as reeve of Wolfe Island and the surrounding islands. He became the first warden of the County, a position he also held the following year and in 1868 as well. He then took a turn at provincial politics, as a Conservative MPP for the riding of Frontenac. He served from 1868 until 1883, with the exception of the years between 1875 and 1877, when he lost favour with the party. In those days, becoming the Conservative candidate in Frontenac was more difficult than winning the election against opposing party candidates. He was also one of the first directors of the K&P Railroad. He was a man who was known for his eccentricities, such as a dislike for short men “for no other reason than that they were short” according to his grandson, as well as men who bit their fingernails (author's note – I'm sure we would have gotten on famously) as well as dogs and people who own them. “When a man's poor,” he said, “he gets a dog. If he's very poor, he gets two.” Dileno Dexter Calvin died in 1884, and despite his great success in Canada, he was buried next to his mother and his first wife in Clayton, NY.

Frontenac Provincial Park, the ultimate jewel in the rough

Rightly so, Frontenac Park is considered the hidden jewel of Frontenac County. It is located in the midst of an array of communities and cottage lakes, within a stone's throw of Sydenham and is a short drive from Kingston; and yet it is a backwoods park in a unique geological and climactic location. It features the best canoeing, camping and hiking this side of Bon Echo Park, which is also a jewel but one that is less hidden and is also shared between Frontenac and Lennox and Addington. In his definitive book on the back story about the land where Frontenac Park is located, “Their Enduring Spirit: the History of Frontenac Park 1783-1990”, Christian Barber extensively researched all of the development that took place in and around the park before the idea of a park was floated and eventually acted upon in the 1960s. In doing so, Their Enduring Spirit is not only a valuable resource in terms of how the park was developed; it is also an account of the difficulties posed by the Frontenac Spur of the Canadian Shield on those who were unlucky enough to attempt homesteading in its rocky terrain. The park is located in what were then Loughborough and Bedford Townships, now both part of the Municipality of South Frontenac. Many of the settlers who attempted to make a life in that region did so in the mid-to-late 1800s. There were some Loyalists among them, but there were also a number of Irish immigrants who made their way first to St. Patrick's Church in Railton, and then headed into the wilderness north of Sydenham in search of a new life. What greeted them was brutal and difficult. The history of a number of homesteading families forms the core of Their Enduring Spirit. Based on historic records, interviews with descendants who lived on or visited those who lived on the farms, and by walking the land and examining the remnants that are being reclaimed as wilderness lands, a picture of life in the back townships during the first 100 years of Frontenac County emerges. The first family to be profiled in the book is the Kemp family, who arrived at their farm at Otter Lake, near the west gate of the park, sometime in the 1860s. By the time of the 1871 census, William and Jane Kemp, both 47, had six children living with them. The land they laid claim to, in addition to other properties taken on by their son George, was very good by local standards. Over two decades of work, making use of the efforts of the entire family, 30 acres of the 95 acre property had been cleared. “That might not sound like much to show for 20 years of labour, but in that district most farms worked 15 or 20 cleared acres. In fact the clearing was usually completed in relatively short order. But it was back-breaking work, without mechanical means. It involved cutting down the trees and clearing the brush, then burning the stumps that could not be wrenched from the ground by a team of horses or oxen and hauled away to form a first fence row. In the meantime the job of raising a crop to feed the family over the winter had to go on, and the first seeds were usually sown among the stumps ... it was no wonder that among the first settlers it was axiomatic to hate trees,” wrote Christian Barber in Their Enduring Spirit. The Kemp family prospered, and by 1900 the original log cabin that was built in the early 1870s had disappeared beneath white, painted clapboard, and numerous outbuildings had been constructed as well. There was a root cellar below, and fields that extended right to the front doorway. Still, cash was not easy to come by. A ledger from M.A. Hogan's General Store in Sydenham illustrates this. In late 1912, Mary Shales Kemp, George's wife, who managed the family finances among numerous other tasks, purchased dishes, a pair of overalls for a dollar, and the indulgences of walnuts and a vase, for a total cost of $7.32. Her custom was to pay for her purchases with butter and eggs from the farm. However on this occasion, after the eggs and butter were factored in there was a shortfall of $1.45. Back went the overalls and the extra 45 cents was paid in cash. During the mica mining year in the first decade of the 20th century, George Kemp found a number of small deposits on his farm, and even took on investors to pay the $70 that was needed for drills and blasting powder at one site. However, enough mica was never found to make a profit on the venture. To the extent that there were roads in the area, they were built and maintained by all of the farmers living in there, sometimes as part of their taxation responsibilities, which, in the late 19th century, included putting in some time improving the local roads. While the Kemp family were able to establish a successful farm in what is now Frontenac Park, it was ultimately unsustainable. Mary Kemp lived on the farm after George died, but moved away in 1928 and sold the property in 1941. The last people to occupy it were a family from Wyoming in the late 1940s. By the time Mary Kemp died in Sydenham in 1952 at the age of 93, the property where she had made her life had been abandoned and the house and barns had burned down. When Christian Barber went to the property in the late 1980s as he was preparing his book, it was mostly overgrown with vegetation, and it required effort on his part to find the remnants of what had been a going concern for 60 or 70 years. He notes this at the end of his chapter on the Kemp family of Kemp Road : “... the fields, so painstakingly cleared and planted and harvested by generations of settlers, are overgrown with sumac and birch, locust and juniper. Rusted barbed wire – embedded by years in the centre of the trees that it was originally stapled to the bark of – is stretched to the breaking point by fallen trees, and there is no one to cut them away; no farmer in overalls, with strong, knuckly, barked, and sun-tanned hands to walk the line on a summer day between haying and harvest and maintain a fence.” The Kemp family's story is similar in outcome to others told in the book - struggle and some success followed by a move to better farmland elsewhere in the region or to work off the farm in Sydenham or beyond. Mining and logging were also prevalent in the park. Logging started in the early 19th century and mining later on, with the logging having the greatest impact on the land, as it did elsewhere in the region generally. In the interesting chapter on mining, Barber touches on the story of Antoine Point on Devil Lake. Francis Edward Antoine and his wife, Letitia Whiteduck, built a log cabin on the Point in the mid 19th century and they are buried there. One of their sons, John Antoine, is listed, along with the government, as the owner of Antoine Point in the 1883 Meacham map, one of the best source materials for information about land ownership in those years. John, with his wife Elizabeth Hollywood, had 11 children. According to Antoine family lore, it was John who found mica deposits at Antoine Point, although there are competing accounts about who found the ore at that location, and it seems that the Point became of interest to mining interests in the early 1890s. There is an entry in the land registry indicating that John Antoine sold his interest in the land to William Jones for $50 in 1897, and the Antoines moved to Godfrey, and eventually back to Sharbot Lake, where another branch of the family was already located. The idea of establishing a wilderness park on the lands in Loughborough and Bedford township that had resisted settlement, and whose lakes (Devil, Big Clear, Otter, and Buck) were not already cut up into cottage lots, was first floated in the 1940s. In 1954 a Parks Division was created within the Department of Lands and Forests of Ontario (the precursor to the Ministry of Natural Resources. In 1957, the Kingston Rod and Gun Club submitted a proposal for a new park to serve the growing numbers of people in Kingston and southern Frontenac County wanting to experience the great outdoors, hiking, camping, fishing and the enjoyment of a sandy beach. The proposal included twenty seven 200 acre lots in Bedford and twenty five 200 acre lots in Lougborough, a total of 16.2 square miles, with an option to increase it to 23.7 square miles if the area below Otter lake was added. That effort was not successful, and seemed to be dead when Murphy's Point Park on Big Rideau Lake near Perth was established instead. Five years later, in 1962, another group, the Kingston Nature Club, put forward a similar proposal. This time, even though the cost of purchasing private land for the park had ballooned to $200,000, the proposal was successful. It eventually cost over $1 million to create Frontenac Park, which opened in the late 1960s. The park's first superintendent, Bruce Page, was the great grandson of Jeremiah, one of the first settlers on the land in the vicinity of what became Frontenac Park.

NORTH FRONTENAC NEWS

AH and NF Councils agree over fire equipment plan

AH and NF Councils agree over fire equipment plan

After a joint North Frontenac-Addington Highlands Council meeting last Friday at Barrie Hall in Cloyne, it appears that concerns about equipment reserves for the joint Kaladar Barrie Fire Department (KBFD) have been laid to rest. The meeting was called at the request of North Fr...

Mayor takes exception to resident’s survey results

By Kip Vankempen’s own admission, it’s just one man’s survey but the results did spark response from Mayor Ron Higgins at North Frontenac’s regular Council meeting last Friday at Barrie Hall in Cloyne. (The meeting was held in Cloyne because it immediately followed a joint Councils meeting with Addington Highlands on the joint fire agreement.) Appearing as a delegation to Council, Vankempen said he used the internet application SurveyMonkey and received 83 responses. Of the 83 respondents: • 92 per cent opposing the new municipal building expenditure• 96 per cent felt the federal gas tax could be put to better use than the building project• 97 per cent believe the Cloyne firehall is important• 97 per cent believe firefighting and rescue equipment should be maintained up to recommended standards• 78 per cent believe the Cloyne playground equipment should be replaced• 99 per cent believe internet voting should be available• 99 per cent would like Council to keep them informed by email• 97 per cent believe cottagers should receive the same relief as year-round residents for Hydro• 93 per cent felt the delivery charge for Hydro should be changed. While Higgins agreed with the respondents as to Hydro charges and pointed out the Township has sent letters to the Province asking for the repeal of the Green Energy Act, he wasn’t as agreeable when it came to the municipal building expenditures. “It is going ahead as is,” Higgins said. “You can’t look at it in isolation because the building itself has no negative impact on taxes, which we’ve kept to the Consumer Price Index.” Higgins said they view the municipal building expenses as “spending on an asset and improving service delivery” and that it has health, safety and accessibility issues. He also said that they have approved a new communications policy. Restoration Project on HoldImprovements to the Palmerston Canonto Conservation Area by the Palmerston Beach Restoration Project Team are on hold following a resolution by Council. Council did pass a bylaw authorizing the Mayor and Clerk to enter into a five-year lease agreement (for $1 per year) with the Mississippi Valley Conservation Authority (MVCA) on the property but execution of lease may also have to wait.The problem is, actual ownership of the property seems to be in question. In a report to Council, manager of community development Corey Klatt said “At the Feb. 16 meeting, we were advised by MVCA staff that there is currently an issue with the ownership of a portion of the property within the PCCA beach area.”Klatt said an adjacent property owner believes he owns some of the property. Coun. Gerry Martin, who has been working with the PBRP team wrote a letter advising them that “the renewal of the MVCA Lease Agreement will be on the April 7 Council Agenda. “The title search has not yet been completed (by MVCA) and until ownership of the property is determined, Council cannot approve work on the lot. There is a possibility the property is actually owned by a third party.” “This is turning out to be a disaster,” said Coun. John Inglis. “They’re not going to be able to do (work) this year.” “We’re dealing with something that was done wrong 30 years ago,” said Martin.

Lodges: Historic and Present presented by CMCA - Part Two

Judd Tooley, Louise Lemke and their Lodge Clarendon & Miller Community Archives (CMCA) are sharing aspects from their research as an introduction to the public presentation May 6th (1 p.m.) Clar-Miller Hall, Plevna. Visitors can browse the many photo boards and researched documents of North Frontenac Lodges and Housekeeping Cottages. Thanks to The Frontenac News for publishing a three- part series in advance of the event. Information and photos for this article were courtesy of Marilyn White and daughter Nancy Hiscock.Judd Tooley’s Lodge (Mackie Lake) Judd Tooley and Louise Lemke were both born and raised in the Plevna area. Judd grew up at Playfair Corners just north of Plevna where his parents Luther and Emma (Wood) lived; Louise at Sand Lake (just west of Plevna) where her family Julius and Carlena (Hartmann) homesteaded.  In the 1920’s, Julius Lemke opened a tourist lodge on Sand Lake and Luther Tooley operated a hunting & fishing lodge on Brule Lake, just north of Plevna off the Mountain Road. Judd and Louise married and had nine children. For part of their lives, they lived on Gorr’s Mountain about a mile from the junction of Schooner Road and Mountain Road. Here the family logged, farmed, raised cattle, and eventually began operating the lodge on nearby Mackie Lake. One of James Proudfoot’s cabins sold to Judd for $35 and moved to Tooley Lodge. Around 1927 Judd and Louise used the cabin as a base and opened the lodge for business. Excellent fishing in Mackie, Fortune and Schooner Lakes attracted visitors from “nearby” Kingston and as far away as the states of Pennsylvania, New York, and Ohio. Judd used to say that you could almost walk across the backs of the speckled trout in the creek between Schooner and Fortune Lakes. Guests arrived at the Tooley farm and from there were taken via horse driven wagon down a rough cart track to Mackie Lake. They were then rowed across the lake to the lodge.   A typical guiding day for Judd included rowing his fishermen across Mackie, walking with gear over to Long Schooner, rowing around the Schooners to the best fishing spots, and then back over to Mackie at the end of the day. For years, patrons were rowed until the first outboard motor called “Champion” was acquired. The Champion is shown in  the photo of Clarence & Irma Tooley and her Mother, Mrs. Blackman.  In later years, several guides were hired to accompany clients on daily fishing trips, which included shore lunches with homemade bread, beans, potatoes & onions and freshly fried fish. Judd’s wife Louise cooked for 40 years at the lodge, with help from 2 or 3 other women. Daily they made 10- 12 loaves of bread and full course meals with homemade pies. Since there was no electricity, all the water (cooking and laundry) was hauled up from the lake. The fridge was almost eight feet tall, oak on the outside, with lead doors. Two large blocks of ice would keep the fridge and its contents cold for at least two days. For approximately three weeks in mid-winter, ice for the fridges and water coolers was cut from the lake in front of the lodge. The ice blocks were sawn by hand, pulled from the lake and hauled to the icehouse.  A gas-driven Delco system was installed to generate power.  Hydro-electricity arrived in the late fifties.The lodge was open from the beginning of fishing season (around May 1st) to the end of deer hunting season in the late fall (mid-November). Boats or sleighs carried every bit of food, supplies and building material across the lake. A platform over two boats transported horses two at a time with one man steadying the horses.  In 1972, the Ministry of Natural Resources built a forest access road to Long Schooner Lake and it was only at this point that Tooley Lodge became accessible by vehicle other than boat, snowmobile, or airplane. Judd and Louise’s son Herb and his wife Grace took over the lodge in 1974. They continued the tradition of providing great fishing and hunting experiences, tasty home cooked meals and friendly and helpful advice. Herb and Grace retired in 2004, and currently (2017) the lodge is operated by Larry Kroetsch.

Lodges: Historic and Present presented by CMCA - Part One

Clarendon & Miller Community Archives (CMCA) will be sharing their latest year-long research covering the topic of Lodges: Past and Present.  This project aims to recognize the huge economic contribution that local lodges/housekeeping cottages made in the past and continue to make to the township. In addition to Lodge information, the Committee collected information about Housekeeping Cottages to assist with the Accommodations listing website that the Frontenac News initiated last year. On May 6th at Clar-Mill Hall in Plevna starting at 1 p.m. CMCA will transform the Hall into a Lodge-like setting, allowing for an interactive format. Guest speaker and well-known country entertainer, Neville Wells, will provide his personal experiences of growing up at his family-owned Mosque Lake Lodge.  Visitors can browse the many photo boards and researched documents of North Frontenac Lodges and Housekeeping Cottages. A panel of lodge owners/workers will share their expertise and engage in a lively discussion with the audience. CMCA thanks The Frontenac News for publishing a three-part series about Lodges: Past and Present as an introduction to the May 6th event. The first Lodge to be highlighted: Coxvale/ Cedar Crest Lodge. This postcard depicts the first known “lodge” at Coxvale. The building was part of the farm built by Donald and Maggie Cox.  Their children were: Richard, Charlie, Guy, Nellie, Hilda, Bobby, Irene and Orpha. They rented cottages that were across the bay and on both sides of the old main road. Cox’s sold to Fred and Jean Lemke in 1945. In 1937 Fred and Jean Lemke bought property at Coxvale on Big Gull Lake which included some sleeping cabins and a dining room. This was the beginning of Cedar Crest Lodge. The next few years Fred built several cottages and he and Jean made plans for a dining room.  Fishing was excellent and Fred was always in demand for guiding. Cedar Crest in 1945 In 1945, they bought the Cox home (first used as dining-room and later became a store). Jean served home-cooked meals with homemade bread, rolls and pies. A store was built in 1947 and during the 50’s Fred added more cottages. During this time a building that had been used as a dance hall was converted to a cottage. At this point they had 13 cottages. In 1960, the old house was torn down and a new home built; the Lemkes purchased the house and three cottages on the other side of the bridge. They lived in that house while Fred did most of the carpenter work on the new home. Upon completion of the new house, the store was moved. A lunch counter was opened and light lunches served. The lounge had a juke box and a pinball machine; it was a meeting place for young people on the lake in the 60’s. Cottages, now numbering 17, were rented into the late fall when Fred guided the hunters and Jean prepared the meals. People kept returning to Cedar Crest, not just for fishing and hunting, but because of the hospitality of the Lemkes. Fred’s stories of the early years at Cedar Crest Lodge were a hit with renters. According to Fred, the last lake trout he saw in Big Gull Lake was in 1940. The biggest walleye he saw from the lake weighed 11 pounds and 3 ounces and was caught by Earl Franz of Ohio.    On Dec.25, 1988 Jean passed away. Fred suffered a stroke in January 1992 and passed away July 6, 1992. Daughter, Barb and son-in-law, Harold Way continued the business for some years.

Longer life for waste sites

David Bucholtz, a representative from the consulting firm Cambium, made a presentation to Council on Friday morning regarding the state of the Township's waste disposal sites. Bucholtz told Council that all of their current active waste disposal sites are meeting the compliance standards, set by the Ministry of Environment, for surface water and ground water contamination. Cambium's predictions for lifespan on the Township's dumps differ significantly from the predictions that the Township's former consultants AECOM presented to Council in 2015. Bucholtz said that the 506 dump site has approximately 30 years left in its life cycle compared to the 13 years that was estimated by AECOM in March of 2015. The Plevna site also showed an increase in lifespan from 19 years to 42 years. The Kashwakamak disposal site stayed the same with a predicted lifespan of 42 years left. In 2015, AECOM predicted the Mississippi Station waste site had 46 years left in its lifespan and Cambium has now suggested that the site has 34 years left. When asked about the disparity between AECOM's predictions for landfill longevity and Cambium's predictions Bucholtz explained that it probably had more to do with the way Cambium uses the data and makes their predictions. “My only assumption at this point would be the average (of landfill) changing,” Bucholtz said. Cambium makes predictions on lifespan based on the amount of waste that has been disposed of over the last 5 years. “What helps also is the fact that we divert all of our bulky waste,” said Jim Phillips, the Public Works Manager for North Frontenac. “The fact that we're diverting all of that, at a cost,  is extending the life of our landfill.” Bucholtz also explained that the Ardoch waste site, which is temporarily closed, still has approximately 37 years left in it, based on the average fill rates they have on record. Cambium made a recommendation to Council to install another monitoring well at the Plevna site to test surface water contamination south of the landfill mound and also recommended that they address the issue of a beaver dam at the Cloyne site, which is used as a transfer station. Building Permits Issued Down Slightly For 2017A report from Scott Richardson, the Building Inspector for North Frontenac, showed 8 building permits have been issued so far this year which is down from 10 at this time last year. Last year, 130 building permits in total were issued in North Frontenac which was up from 125 in 2015. Official Plan Heads to Public MeetingCouncil discussed amendments made in the latest draft of their Official Plan on Friday and didn't recommend any further amendments. A Public Meeting regarding the Official Plan has been scheduled for April 22, 2017 at 10am.

CENTRAL FRONTENAC NEWS

New public works manager is “a big roads guy”

New public works manager is “a big roads guy”

With 25 years experience working on roads crews, new Central Frontenac Public Works Manager Brad Thake hopes to be a “voice of reason” and provide the same sort of stability in the position that his predecessor, Mike Richardson brought. “Mike was a heavy roads guy and a big brid...

Electoral systems, federal debt subjects of discussion evening

“The closer you come to true proportionality, the more complex it becomes,” speaker Norm Hart told a discussion group gathered in Sharbot Lake’s Oso Hall last week. “(So) you can never achieve true proportionality.” Hart’s part of the evening was focused on the different voting systems democracies use around the world. In his talk, ‘Making Every Vote Matter,’ he explained the differences, similarities, strength, weaknesses and nuances of various systems used to achieve proportional representation, ie where the number of seats a party gets in a ruling body is wholly or in part based on the percentage of popular vote. Hart outlined several alternatives to the current First-Past-The-Post system including the Single Member Party Proportional System, Multi-Member Proportional System, and ranked balloting. He and his Citizen’s Democracy Forum compatriots advocate the Single Member Party Proportional System whereby all members are still elected and vote but their votes are weighted the portion of the popular vote they receive. “Under this system, Elizabeth May would get 10 votes whereas each Liberal MP would get 0.9 of a vote,” he said. “It’s not that different from the current system in that we wouldn’t have to change any ridings but it would force members to have to talk to each other.” He said this system requires a “threshold” of having to elect at least one member and getting 3 per cent of the total vote in order to prevent “fringe” candidates from creating an unworkable parliament. The second part of the evening was turned over to Wagerville’s own Jerry Ackerman, who has a PhD from Purdue University in agricultural economics. Ackerman’s presentation was less lecture and more debate stimulation as he and Herb Wiseman of Comer.org led a discussion of how the federal government’s fiscal policies have led to crippling interest payments on a public debt in excess of $600 billion. Ackerman maintains that when Canada joined the international finance system in 1974, the Bank of Canada stopped funding the government and we began to borrow the needed funds from private banks. “The consequence of this is that the compounded interest now owed to the private banking system meant less money available for the needed goods and services (hospitals, schools, roads) while the private banks have reaped enormous profits,” he said. “What a scam.” Ackerman advocates a return to using the Bank of Canada instead of private banks. “Until recently, most of us assumed that states can’t go bankrupt,” he said. “We have now learned our assumption was illusory. “What happened in Japan, Asia, Latin American and recently in Portugal, Iceland, Ireland, and Greece can happen in the U.S., Canada, England, France or Germany. “The decisive factor here is not the absolute level of debt, but the rapid growth of interest burden this debt entails, resulting from compound interest.”

Training course at Shabot Obaadjiwan office

A construction worker training course co-sponsored by the St. Lawrence College Employment Centre in Sharbot Lake and the Shabot Obaadjiwan First Nation, is wrapping up this week, and Chief Doreen Davis is pleased with the results. The 8 week course was designed for self identified indigenous youth (under 29) interested in learning carpentry skills and work-site safety. Local contractor Kevin Rioux supervised the trainees, who received boots, hats, tools and belts at the start of the course, took some training courses, and then began to do some renovations to the Shabot Obaadjiwan offices on Hwy 7 just east of Arden. “Not only did they completely re-do our boardroom and add a small office and shelving, they also did some work on the exterior building and built a brand new storage shed,” said Davis, “We paid for the materials but they provided all the labour. It was more than we originally talked about getting done and it helped the participants learn skills. Many of them have jobs lined up after the course ends.” Kevin Rioux said that the shed they built was finished as a house would be finished, not only to make a good product, but to provide for more of a learning opportunity. “They really progressed during the course,” said Rioux, “and I have enjoyed teaching it as well.” Chief Davis said that the Shabot Obaadjiwan is planning to apply once again to host a program in the future, either at their offices or their nation site on White Lake, where they have built a large meeting hall and have plans for improvements and ancillary structures. “These projects help us, they provide skills for our youth in a field where there are jobs, and they are good for the local economy because we buy all our materials at the Home Hardware in Sharbot Lake,” she said.

CF Minor Softball gears up for 2017

The Central Frontenac Minor Softball Association kicked off the 2017 season Saturday in Mountain Grove with its registration session. Association president Kurtis Jackson said the on-field season will get underway in mid-May, depending on field conditions and the weather and continue into mid-August (the bantam and junior men’s teams schedule go a little longer). They’ll be fielding six mixed teams and one girls bantam team this year with seven home games and six away games. Home games are played in Sharbot Lake, Parham and Mountain Grove. Away games can be as far away as Lansdowne and Gananoque. “We’re affiliated with the Kingston Area Inter-Community Softball Association,” Jackson said. “All of the teams except Grasshoppers play away games.” They have the players all lined up but they could still use some coaches and even more important — umpires. There is a training session scheduled for April 22 and if you’re interested, call Annette Grey-Jackson at 613-449-0060 for details. The Association is also planning a volleyball tournament fundraiser for April 8 at GREC. Call Christine Teal at 613- 375-6525 for more on that and/or visit the Association’s Facebook page. This year’s executive is Kurtis Jackson, president, Ryan Beattie, vice-president, Leanne Cowdy, secretary, Christine Teal, treasurer and Annette Grey-Jackson, equipment/umpires. Area reps are Marcie Asselstine, Sharbot Lake, Owen Tryon, Parham and Jamie Riddell, Mountain Grove.

Sharbot Lake Lion’s to hold open meeting

An open meeting will be hosted by the Sharbot Lake & District Lions Club on April 26th at the S. L. Legion on Cannon Rd. The public is invited to join the Lions for social hour between 5 and 6 PM and then sit down to a delicious dinner ($15 for entrée, dessert & tea or coffee) served up by the Legion kitchen staff. Then stay for the regular Lion’s meeting 7 PM. Haven’t you ever wondered what exactly the Lion’s Club does? How their meetings are run or how they raise money and where that money goes? Well, now you can see for yourself! You will learn first-hand how the Lions Club has been serving the Sharbot Lake area for over 65 years. The Lion’s Club supports Adopt-A-Highway, their pavilion at Oso Beach, the Central Frontenac summer swim program and the parades at Christmas and on Canada Day. Over the years they have purchased equipment for the medical centre, the playground at the beach and have provided financial support to the dog guides, the Salvation Army, Diabetes Canada, the food bank and many others, including people with specific needs within this community. They could do none of this without the support of local folks like you! When a Lion asks you to buy a chocolate Easter bunny, a Christmas fruit cake or a raffle ticket on any of their great prizes, your money goes to support all of the above – and more! Members are proud of their ‘Vision Screening’ program in which they have been testing the eyesight and hearing of local kindergarten and grade one students for more than 10 years. In October they visit the schools in Plevna and Mountain Grove, along with Granite Ridge and St. James Major Schools in Sharbot Lake. They use equipment purchased with the monies they have collected through their various fundraising activities. This year in this district they have tested over 7000 kids. And they continue to support a project called ‘No Child Without’. In this program, they work hand-in-hand with the Medic Alert Association to provide every child in our local schools with the Medic Alert bracelets they may need to keep them safe at school, at home and everywhere in between. They also support our senior citizens. In mid-June each year they go to a Seniors Home to barbeque hamburgers and hot dogs for the residents and their families. And each October for the past 40 years they have invited local seniors to spend a wonderful evening of entertainment, prizes and good things to eat. The club even provides the buses to bring folks in from far and near. Anyone 18 and over can become a Lion. And we have recently sponsored a LEO Club for younger members of our area who want to serve their community. Membership provides people with the opportunity to meet and work with other individuals, striving toward the common goal of helping those in need. The satisfaction gained by being a part of these efforts is one of the big rewards of being a Lion or Leo. Mark April 26 on your calendars and in the meantime, check out their Facebook page or visit the websites: www.sharbotlions.com or www.lionsclubs.org. To reserve your seat for dinner, just contact any Lions Club member, email us at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or call 613-539-8190 or 613-375-6318.

SOUTH FRONTENAC NEWS

5 Star Farm draws an Easter Crowd

5 Star Farm draws an Easter Crowd

5 star farm is located on Scanlan Road, and is easy to reach from either Road 38 or the Village of Sydenham. Curtis and Tracy, who run the farm with help from their children, bought the property in 2014. It is an older farm property with plenty of character, big barns and drive s...

Firearms stolen in South Frontenac

The Frontenac Ontario Provincial Police (OPP) is investigating a break and enter that occurred at a Snider Road residence in South Frontenac Township. The investigation revealed that sometime between the 7th of April 2017 and the 14th of April 2017, culprit(s) gained access to the residence and stole a laptop, cellphone as well as several firearms. Firearms include;1. Savage Long Range Hunter Riffle with post and scope, .338 caliber, black in colour. 2. Savage Axis Vortex Viper Riffle with a scope, .243 caliber, black in colour. 3. Mossberg 12 -gauge shotgun pump action with scope, a brown wood colour.4. Winchester Ranger 12-gauge pump action shotgun, a light coloured wood. 5. Savage Lady Hunter Riffle with a scope, .308 caliber, a medium brown wood colour.6. Rossi British Riffle, .303 caliber, dark brown in colour. The OPP Forensic Identification Services assisted in the investigation. The matter is still under investigation. Anyone with information about this matter is asked to contact the Frontenac OPP Detachment at 613-372-1932 or 1-888-310-1122. If you wish to remain anonymous, you are encouraged to contact Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477. Persons giving tips to Crime Stoppers that lead to an arrest may be eligible for a cash reward. Crime Stoppers does not subscribe to Call Display. Your call will stay anonymous and your presence won't be needed in court. Tips can also be sent via text message and e-mail. For more information visit the National Capital Crime Stoppers' website at www.CrimeStoppers.ca.

Desert Lake Resort noise exemption granted limited one-year trial

South Frontenac Council granted Desert Lake Resort an exemption from its noise bylaw that will allow the resort to hold four concerts this summer at Council’s regular meeting this week in Sydenham. In a recorded vote, Coun. Alan Revill and Ross Sutherland voted against the proposal. The resort had been seeking permission to hold six concerts but many residents on the lake opposed the idea. However, after considerable discussions, most felt two concerts would be acceptable. The final decision is not without restrictions. Concerts (which the resolution refers to as “amplified musical events”) can only be held from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. and the Township must be notified three weeks in advance of the date. Furthermore, of the four events, two can be held on holiday long weekends (Victoria Day and Canada Day most likely) and the other two are to be held on non-holiday weekends. As this year is being thought of as a trial basis, Council asked that bylaw enforcement representatives be on the lake to observe and report back on noise levels. “I think this is a reasonable compromise,” said Mayor Ron Vandewal. “I’m sure there are people in Havelock who don’t like the jamboree but we have to acknowledge that it’s an economy boost for that municipality and I certainly don’t have a problem with concerts on Canada Day because most people are celebrating then anyway. “And to my knowledge, there’s never been a problem with the resort in the past. I don’t know of any time that bylaw enforcement has been called.” Coun. Ross Sutherland said that he has heard of incidents when the OPP has been called and argued that one of the attractions of South Frontenac is peace and quiet. “I would like to remind Council that we limit the number of days people can set off fireworks and we give very few exemptions to our noise bylaw,” Sutherland said. “The times we do grant exceptions are for special circumstances like the Canadian Guitar Festival or large weddings.” Coun. Mark Schjerning said he wasn’t comfortable with the idea of bylaw officers being present on the lake for the event. “Our policy has always been complaint driven,” he said. “I know it sounds funny to have bylaw enforcement there,” said Vandewal. “But you know people are likely to complain anyway and it would be good to have an independent assessment of the noise levels around the lake.” Road allowance closingCouncil cleared up a somewhat long-standing issue by closing a road allowance off Atkins Lane in Storrington District. Planner Lindsay Mills said that they had to re-advertise the proposal because an adjacent property owner, Lori Greenwood, hadn’t been properly notified. Greenwood’s access to her property is through the affected land. However, Greenwood said at the meeting she wanted the measure to pass so that the owners could get on with their lives. She did have one concern though. “Why didn’t you tell me about this a year ago?” she said. “You seem to have no problem finding me with tax bills.” Community grantsCouncil allocated $13,477 in grants to 11 community groups for various projects. The grantees include: Sydenham Lion’s Club - $1,842 for benches at The Point; Verona Community Association, $1,970 for a Flagpole with Canadian flag at the Verona Trailhead site; Frontenac Society of Model Engineers, $1,000 for safety repairs to locomotive for miniature railway; Frontenac Fury, $1,000 for girls hockey development; Sydenham Lake Canoe Club, $425 for waterproof two way radios; Verona Lion’s, $2,000 for a garbage container at Verona Trailhead site; Southern Frontenac Community Services, $2,000 for youth volunteer co-ordination; Frontenac ball hockey, $1,000 for the program; Sydenham Lakes and Trails Festival, $740 for flyers and a banner; and 4-H Sine Club, $1,500 to increase registration and promote swine farming. $15,000 was allocated to the grant program in the 2017 budget, and requests were submitted for $16,477. All of the groups that applied received funding, but three of the groups, Frontenac Society of Model Engineers, Frontenac Fury, and Frontenac ball hockey, applied for $2,000 and received $1,000. Building starts in normal rangeBuilding permits for $2.077 million in construction were sold in the 1st quarter of 2017, down slightly  from $2.16 million in 2016. The total for all of 2016 was $29.3 million, up from $26.9 million in 2015. Permits for 4 new houses were issued in the first quarter of this year, which is normal for the time of year. The total number of new houses was 70 last year, a jump of 15 from the year before. The busiest quarter for new home permits last year was the 2nd quarter, when 30 were issued.

School Project Connects Generations

Elinor Rush, in her role as fibre artist in Loughborough Public School, shows grade one and two students a completed version of the Sensory Blankets she is currently helping them make. Also known as “Fidget Quilts”, these colourful, textural items have been found to calm and occupy people who have Alzheimers or other forms of dementia. The small quilts incorporate a lot of things to distract and occupy an anxious, often confused and restless person: they include a variety of surface textures, soft fringes, bright colours, big buttons in buttonholes, large beads on a ribbon, and even a zipper. It’s an ambitious sewing project for children so young, but Rush has ensured success by doing much of the prep work beforehand, so each child can finish a square by practising a recently-learned skill such as sewing on a button or a small heart, cutting a fringe, or threading beads. In the week before, Rush gave the children small needle ‘books’ with their own needles, and taught needle-threading, knotting and simple stitching. Each child stitched their initial, cut from bright felt, onto the book cover, and sewed a button onto one of the fabric pages. Rush will assemble the children's completed squares into small six-square quilts, a size that will fit comfortably across a person’s lap. In another week, the children will go by bus to Fairmount Home, where they will meet the people to whom they are giving the quilts. The children have been delighted to know that they can help someone else with their sewing. Throughout the project, the theme has been “resilience”; helping seniors cope with the changes they are facing, and learning, themselves, to master new sewing skills that will improve with practice, and may prove useful in their own lives.

Brad Barbeau joins SF Council

In January, South Frontenac Council invited Harrowsmith resident Brad Barbeau to fill the vacancy on Council created by Councillor Bill Robinson’s death late last year. Barbeau had been a candidate in Portland district in the last municipal election, and was a close runner-up. “There’s a lot of ‘catchup’ to do,” said Barbeau, in reference to having been dropped into Council halfway through its term; “and I’ve been told I’m a perfectionist.” He added that his fellow councillors have been helpful, both in bringing him up to speed on current issues, and occasionally adjusting what would usually be daytime committee meetings to accommodate his work schedule. In his mid-thirties, Barbeau is the youngest member of Council, and only he and Schjerning have full-time jobs and young families. Barbeau grew up in Madoc, moving to South Frontenac just before entering his final year of high school in Sydenham. He went on to Queen’s, and now works there as senior management in the technology section of the School of Business. He left his “spare time” position as organist and interim choral director at St George’s when his first son was born, and is currently organist at St Paul’s in Sydenham, and teaches two computer courses at St Lawrence. Barbeau’s interest in local politics has been with him for much of his life: he married his high school sweetheart, whose father was Reeve, and remembers growing up listening to community issues being discussed at the dinner table. He’s particularly committed to the importance of farming and preservation of farmland, and feels this does not preclude well-planned residential development. He spoke of the ‘interesting mix’ of South Frontenac residents with people who have been born and grown up here living beside recently-arrived “city folk”, and the challenges this presents in fostering a sense of community. He’s intrigued with the concept of a Heritage Committee, which might be a way of helping owners of older homes to access funds for upkeep and maintenance. And he wonders if anyone out there even knows he’s on Council, for almost no one has contacted him yet about local concerns or issues: he can be reached at: 613-376-6644, or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

FRONTENAC COUNTY NEWS

Stuff The Cruiser campaign gives food bank “a presence”

Stuff The Cruiser campaign gives food bank “a presence”

For many years now, food bank volunteers have been joined by OPP auxiliary members and it’s been a mutually beneficial arrangement. In Sydenham, Verona and Sharbot Lake (like last Saturday), auxiliary officers have brought a police vehicle to a local grocery store (like Mike Dea...

Secure funding for Paramedicine program

Frontenac Paramedic services took some initiative a few years ago establishing paramedicine services, which involve making use of paramedic infrastructure and staff capacity to provide services aimed at preventing the kinds of catastrophic medical events that lead to 911 calls for service. To that end, with funding from the county and provincial grant money a wellness clinic in Marysville, on Wolfe Island, was established, and later visiting clinics at Diners clubs across the County have been set up. Now the province has established Paramedicine as an ongoing program and has tasked the Local Health Integration Networks (LHIN’s) with distributing funding to local paramedic services. It’s all a bit confusing because the boundaries that the LHIN’s are using don’t correspond to our service boundaries,” said Frontenac Chief of Paramedic Services Paul Charbonneau. While there is only $312,000 available for programming in the southeast LHIN territory, which includes 6 counties  (Hastings, Prince Edward, Lennox and Addington, Frontenac, Lanark, and Leeds Grenville) and the City of Kingston, $58,000 of that money must be allocated to Frontenac Paramedic Services to continue the programs that are already in place. “We are glad of the guaranteed funding,” said Charbonneau, “and we will be preparing a submission for some new initiatives.” One possibility is to set up a clinic in a social housing complex in the City of Kingston, where Frontenac Paramedic Services delivers service. “One of the positive aspects of paramedicine for our paramedics is it can be a good fit for older paramedics,” he said. Charbonneau is hoping Frontenac County will be able to secure $100,000 or so in funding out of the $362,000 that is available by designing highly effective programs for vulnerable population sectors in Kingston and Frontenac. No user fees on K&P TraillLast fall, Frontenac County Council entered into an agreement with the Eastern Ontario Traills Alliance (EOTA) to manage the soon to be completed  K&P Traill between the southern border of the county and the trailhead in Sharbot Lake for an annual price of $400 per kilometre. The Tweed based Not-For-Profit Corporation manages a network of trails across Eastern Ontario, including the popular ATV oriented trails in North Frontenac. It has been very successful over the past ten years as an ATV tourism marketing and trail management agency. Most EOTA trail users pay annual trail fees, and the trails are motorised. The K&P Trail is a hybrid, however. ATV’s are not permitted from Verona South and are permitted to the north. The maintenance agreement with EOTA stipulated that no fees would be charged for the section of trail from Sharbot Lake to the South, but at a county budget meeting in November a discussion took place about the amount of funding that the County is spending on trails and some members of council argued that trails should be “self-sustainable”. According to the staff account from that meeting  “it was questioned if the County should start looking at charging a user fee as most other recreational areas such as Big Sandy Bay and other Trails charge a user fee. Subsequently, an action item was requested to have the Community Development Advisory Committee review the Trails Master Plan to look at including user fees”. But in a report to Council from Clerk Janette Amini, the fact that a bylaw as passed establishing a no-fee contract, it would require a complicated set of procedures to unpack the contract in order to consider adding fees. In response to Amini’s report, Frontenac Islands Mayor Dennis Doyle, who speculated about a fee in the first place, did not comment. South Frontenac Councilor John McDougall said “we can make it clear now to everyone that there will be no fee to use the trail.”

Accommodations in Frontenac

The County of Frontenac is looking for input from residents and businesses as it’s trying to find ways to increase the number of overnight stays in the County in all four seasons of the year. To better understand what’s needed to increase the number of overnight stays, Frontenac County and consulting firm MDB Insight are hosting workshops in each of the County’s member municipalities. Anyone with a stake in tourism is encouraged to participate in these workshops and findings will be incorporated in a toolkit to help grow four season accommodations, including marketing strategies, new digital approaches and leveraging the network of existing businesses. Tourism operators, accommodation providers, cultural associations, business owners and other interested parties are all invited. Workshop Dates and Locations:North Frontenac: Wednesday April 19, 7:00 - 9:00 p.m. Clar-Mill Community Hall, 6598 Buckshot Lake Road, Plevna Registration: https://accommodationsinnorthfrontenac.eventbrite.caFrontenac Islands: Monday May 1, 1:00 - 3:00 p.m. Community Hall, 26 Division Street, Wolfe Island Registration: https://accommodationsonfrontenacislands.eventbrite.caSouth Frontenac: Monday May 1, 7:00 - 9:00 p.m. Storrington Centre - 3910 Battersea Road, Sunbury Registration: https://accommodationsinsouthfrontenac.eventbrite.caCentral Frontenac: Tuesday May 2, 9:00 - 11:00 a.m. St. Lawrence College Employment Services, 1099 Garrett St., Sharbot Lake Registration: https://accommodationsincentralfrontenac.eventbrite.ca

InFrontenac – brand ambassadors meet and greet

Alison Vandervelde and Richard Allen of the Frontenac County Economic Development department thought that fifteen or twenty of the 68 Frontenac County brand ambassadors would accept their invitation to hold an informal social gathering at the Sharbot Lake County Inn last Thursday (March 30). “When over 50 said they were coming we were pretty surprised,” said Vandervelde “but then again I knew that businesses who have taken on the role of brand ambassador are an enthusiastic bunch.” Vandervelde made a short presentation at the gathering, which included business owners from all four townships, and the staff of the Frontenac Community Futures Development Corporation. She talked about plans to use the brand and the InFrontenac tagline to promote unique adventures in Frontenac County this summer. “Mostly what people wanted to do was meet each other and have a good time and maybe talk about business a little bit. There was a lot of energy in the room,” she said. Sandra White of the Sharbot Lake Country Inn hosted the event and provided appetizers, offerings that were augmented by a large meat board that Mike Mckenzie from Seed to Sausage brought along.  White talked about the journey she has gone through as owner of the Country Inn and Crossings Pub over 7 years. Along with her husband Frank and their three daughters they have renovated the entire building, creating a dining room/performance space that hosts east coast and other musical acts from across Canada. The rooms at the Inn are now mostly renovated as well. She also works at the local branch of RBC and invited representatives from the branch to the event to mingle with the ambassadors. “You have to take every opportunity to promote what you do,” she said afterwards. “We are enthusiastic that this summer will be a good one for businesses in Frontenac County,” said Vandervelde, “and as we hope that as we pick up more ambassadors they will continue to promote each other, making Frontenac a more attractive destination. It is easier to talk up other businesses when you know the people who run them.” Later this spring, meetings are being organized to take a broad look at accommodations in Frontenac. For more information or to become a brand ambassador, go to Infrontenac.ca and follow the links. (The Frontenac News is an InFrontenac brand ambassador)

2nd rural summit on poverty and housing to be held on April 18th

Local service agencies, experts and the general public are invited to attend the 2nd Rural Summit on Poverty and Housing to work together on ways to address the unique challenges faced by vulnerable rural residents in Frontenac County. The summit will take place on Tuesday, April 18, from 1:00 to 4:00pm at Oso Hall, 1107 Garrett Street in Sharbot Lake, Ontario. “We’re trying to keep the momentum of last year’s rural summit going,” says Louise Moody, Executive Director at Northern Frontenac Community Services (NFCS), who is co-hosting the event with Southern Frontenac Community Services (SFCSC). “As a result of the 2016 session, we’ve been exploring some of the ideas proposed.” At the 2017 version of the summit, two presentations will be made related to housing options. Chantal Landry and Robert Diebel are Occupational Therapy students from Queen’s University who have been doing their community development placement with both NFCS and SFCSC. They will present “Shared Housing: Is this an option for Frontenac County” based on research and analysis they have been conducting. This will be followed by a presentation titled “I Think I Can, I Think I Can – the little community that could: a model for independently-funded rural housing” presented by Fay Martin and Max Ward from Haliburton County Places for People. Following these presentations, discussion will be facilitated to consider the models presented. “We know that local solutions are the best solutions,” says Louise Moody, “but these presentations will give us great models to consider. Will they work? Maybe. Can we adapt them? Probably. It will be a healthy discussion.” Adds David Townsend, Executive Director for SFCSC, “Our county and townships have unique characteristics, such as a high proportion of seniors, and a vast geography that can present a lot of challenges. This is a great opportunity to view these models through a lens that is specific to our unique situation.”

ADDINGTON HIGHLANDS NEWS

Vulnerable Person Registry

Vulnerable Person Registry

The Napanee/Kaladar Detachment of the Ontario Provincial Police (OPP) would like to make the public aware of The Vulnerable Person Registry (VPR) that is now available to the community. This service allows caregivers and guardians to submit vital information about a person who ma...

Life after politics

Ken Hook has been a pheasant farmer, the Reeve of Addington Highlands, Executive Director of Land O’Lakes Community Services, and he currently runs a videography company with his wife Kathy. He is also an athlete, and a pretty good one, it turns out. Recently, he had an unexpected win in the Hamilton Around the Bay 5K running race on March 26th where he placed 1st in the age 60-64 division in a field of 51 runners. Overall, Ken placed 172 in a field of 2385 runners. Last summer, Ken qualified in Ottawa at the 2016 Canadian Triathlon Championships as one of the top 10 athletes in his age category which enables him to compete as part of Team Canada at the ITU World Championships in Rotterdam, Netherlands, September 14-17, 2017. Ken's event is the "Sprint Triathlon" which is a 750m swim, 20K bike and 5K run which takes under 2 hours to complete. Ken trains in the Cloyne area and swims in Skootamatta Lake. He will be competing in several running races and triathlons in Ontario prior to the Rotterdam event. (Information provided by Tracy Hook, a proud brother)

Addington Highlands Council, April 3

Something you don’t see at a municipal council meeting very often is a resident making a delegation and going to bat for a neighbour. But at Addington Highlands regular Council meeting this week in Flinton, Amos Shiner did just that. Shiner took exception to the way Larry Knox has been treated with respect to the enforcement of the yard clean-up bylaw. Knox has been instructed to clean up his Hwy. 41 property. Shiner said a bylaw enforcement officer visited Knox March 1 and gave him until April 17 to comply. “Larry has been in the hospital for lung surgery and I’m here asking for an extension,” Shiner said. Shiner said allegations that nothing had been done were untrue as Knox had “taken a pickup load to the dump.” Shiner also said there were extenuating circumstances in that some of the metal to be removed was still frozen in the ground. “I’ve talked to many people who are not happy with the way this was done,” Shiner said. Shiner said the incident has raised other concerns for him and he plans to do something about them. “Our bylaw does not comply with the Charter of Rights (and Freedoms),” he said. “One person (the bylaw enforcement officer) has the authority to enter anyone’s property and act as judge without appeal. “We feel bullied by this bylaw so we’re taking petitions (and) you’re going to see a lot of me until this bylaw is changed.” Shiner also said he has issues with other municipal statutes including the Official Plan. Council thanked Shiner for his presentation.

Sail Mazinaw sock burn

Sunday March 26 was the first Sunday of Spring 2017.  Friends of Brown's Camp and Sail Mazinaw gathered for the 2nd Annual Mazinaw Sock Burn.  The event was again hosted by Tina and Dana Richard at their Addington Rd 5 home.  The crews braved the rain to burn the socks they had been wearing all winter.  After the ceremony, they moved indoors to enjoy coffee, treats, and good company.  It was all very good fun. The sock burning ritual was a sign of the approaching sailing season.  However, Mazinaw Lake was still completely covered with ice and was supporting traffic from snowmobiles, 4-wheelers, and bicycles. The 2017 edition of Sail Mazinaw is scheduled for Saturday July 08.  All sailors are encouraged to bring their boats and their boards to Mazinaw Lake this summer to join the flotilla.  Check the Sail Mazinaw Facebook page for more details.

NAEC Vikings Golden Performance at LDSB Skills

Once again, the North Addington Education Centre Skills Team brought their “A” game to the Limestone District Skills Competition, held at St. Lawrence College last Friday. Taking on students from LDSB, Algonquin Lakeshore and Hastings County, the Vikings competed with the top students in four events. Jared Mieske, a grade 9 student, competed in the Small Powered Equipment contest, with a very strong showing. In the Graphic Design Presentation competition, Mackenzie Johnson (grade 10) and Natalie Reynolds (grade 12) competed against very strong designs, presenting a poster, t-shirt and button designs they made, advertising the Provincial Skills Competition. Natalie Reynolds won the gold for a second year in a row, with an outstanding design. In the Graphic Design Studio Production competition, Bradley Kavanaugh-Sweeney, Kaden Snider (grade 9), Zach Andrew (grade 10), Gaven Burke (grade 11), Denver Lucas, Emma Fuller and Brittany Delyea (grade 12) completed a rigorous challenge, designing a logo and several pieces of media based on specific criteria at the competition. Emma Fuller won gold for a second year in a row and Brittany Delyea won the bronze medal.In the Photography Competition, Brianna Bolduc (grade 11), Emma Grand, Terri-Lynn Rosenblath and Shannon Delyea (grade 12) brought their best photographs, completed an editing test and shot photographs then edited on site, in fast paced schedule. Shannon Delyea won the gold medal and Terri-Lynn Rosenblath won the silver.   The Skills Competition is a curriculum based competition that has students compete in real life scenarios of the skilled trades. It is an internationally recognized event. The gold medal winners have qualified to move on to compete at the Provincial level in Toronto, May 1st to 3rd as part of Team Limestone. Congratulations to the entire team!

EDITORIALS

  • Unanswered questions in the Srigley case
    It’s been almost 4 years since Bob Srigley was shot by police on the porch of his trailer on Arden Road. We know a few things about what happened, but only a few. He was armed with what the Special Investigations Unit report into his death described as a weapon…
    Written on Wednesday, 19 April 2017 14:13 in Editorials
  • Big Pot, and big taxes, will rule the day
    When I plant a garden each year, I am free to grow as much lettuce, peppers, tomatoes, squash, peas, beans, or potatoes as I am able to. Sometimes I grow extra and give some away. If I grow more squash than I can eat and my neighbour grows more beans,…
    Written on Wednesday, 12 April 2017 11:32 in Editorials
More Editorials

LETTERS

  • Re – NF survey
    I wanted to personally thank you and your reporter Craig for the excellent job covering my presentation before North Frontenac Council . It is a shame that regular communication between our elected officials and residents is almost non-existent. The Mayor’s last message is only found on their website dated June…
    Written on Wednesday, 19 April 2017 14:40 in Letters
  • Re – Editorial
    Let me start by saying that I am one of those types of Canadians who will tell you that smoking marajuana is not good for you. It is especially harmful to younger people with developing brains and perceptions. Regardless, let me also say that comparing the usefulness of pot to…
    Written on Wednesday, 19 April 2017 14:38 in Letters
More Letters

Editorials


Letters


REGULAR COLUMNS


CLASSIFIEDS


OBITUARIES


FRONTENAC COUNTY


SOUTH FRONTENAC


NORTH FRONTENAC


CENTRAL FRONTENAC


ADDINGTON HIGHLANDS