Featured News

Ompah diners welcome a special guest

Ompah diners welcome a special guest

Written By: Jeff Green | Published: January-17-2018 | Category: NORTH FRONTENAC
Tagged Under: Ompah, Seniors

Somehow, they fooled Leeanne White. She was going up to what she calls “the government lunch” in Ompah, the monthly Rural Frontenac Community Services Diners lunch at the newly renovated ...

...

Rampant vandalism on Bob’s Lake.

Rampant vandalism on Bob’s Lake.

Written By: Jeff Green | Published: January-17-2018 | Category: SOUTH FRONTENAC
Tagged Under: Tichborne, OPP

Eleven cottages on Maple Lane, Meadow Lane, and Maple Grove Crescent were vandalised by perpetrators on an ATV last Friday night between sometime before 9pm and 11pm. Patio and garage doors were smash...

...

Kurt Thompson’s team takes bragging rights in 4 on 4 shinny tourney for minor ball

Kurt Thompson’s team takes bragging rights in 4 on 4 shinny tourney for minor ball

Written By: Craig Bakay | Published: January-17-2018 | Category: CENTRAL FRONTENAC
Tagged Under: hockey, Tichborne

Minor softball has held a fundraising 4 on 4 hockey tournament for several years now at the outdoor rink in Tichborne but last year the weather didn’t cooperate and so it had to be cancelled. T...

...

Death at Tichborne – Debra Teal dies after being dropped off at her home by OPP – SIU investigating

Death at Tichborne – Debra Teal dies after being dropped off at her home by OPP – SIU investigating

Written By: Jeff Green | Published: January-17-2018 | Category: CENTRAL FRONTENAC
Tagged Under: OPP, Tichborne, People

49 year old Debra Anne Hill (Teal) was found by her son in-law Owen Young early on Saturday morning outside of her home on Steele Road near Tichborne, and was declared deceased by Emergency Srevices p...

...

Fire Chief Chesebrough Retires

Fire Chief Chesebrough Retires

When Council reconvened from a closed session for their regular meeting, CAO Orr announced that they had just accepted Fire Chief Rick Chesebrough’s resignation; after more than 14 years of serv...

...

Change is good for guitar player McCullough

“Life’s good,” said guitarist Shawn McCullough in between sets Saturday night at T...

Addington Highlands Council in the dark as to what legal pot will mean

A request from the Too Far, Too Fast organization for Addington Highlands to declare itself an &lsqu...

Can you compare taxes between Frontenac municipalities? Maybe.

I have often wondered why the tax rates in the Frontenac townships vary so much, and why it is that ...

Tackling dementia in Frontenac County

Pam Morey knows dementia is random, relentless and frighteningly common. Speaking from her administ...

German longsword historical tradition lives on in Bellrock

When you think ‘martial arts,’ chances are your thoughts tend towards the Orient. When w...

German longsword historical tradition lives on in Bellrock

When you think ‘martial arts,’ chances are your thoughts tend towards the Orient. When w...

Bucket Drumming Receives Community Foundation Grant

Rural Frontenac Community Services has been awarded $8825.00 from the Community Foundation of Kingst...

EOWC elects Chair, Vice-Chair and sets priorities for 2018

The Eastern Ontario Wardens’ Caucus (EOWC), at its annual inaugural meeting held last week in ...

49 year old woman found dead in Tichborne

OPP Investigate Death SIU Invoke Mandate  Members of the Ontario Provincial Police (OPP) Front...

Loughborough Christmas and Emergency Committee

Working with a core board of five: Sue Clinton, Bev McNeill, Jim Kelly, Katie Koopman, and Coleen Ur...

Search

Advertisement

front-ad-capstone

NORTH FRONTENAC NEWS

Ompah diners welcome a special guest

Ompah diners welcome a special guest

Somehow, they fooled Leeanne White. She was going up to what she calls “the government lunch” in Ompah, the monthly Rural Frontenac Community Services Diners lunch at the newly renovated hall, and she said she “just happened to say to my friend that it was comi...

Most septic systems inspected either no concerns (52 per cent) or some remedial work (45 per cent)

About 52 per cent of the septic systems inspected during the 2017 program had no concerns, Eric Kohlsmith of Mississippi Rideau Septic System Office told North Frontenac Council at its regular meeting last Friday in Plevna. However, he said, only one system was recommended for replacement. The other 45 per cent only needed some remedial work including pump outs and replacing baffles. “It should be noted that age was not a significant factor in the system deficiencies identified,” he said. He said interaction with property owners was “very positive” and that 64 per cent of the property owners were present during the inspections. He said 41 park land campsites were inspected in the 2017 program, all on Crotch Lake. “Given the difficult access and rough terrain, the North Frontenac Park Lands group does a very good job in trying to place the privies in the ideal location — greater than 15 metres from the water and in soil with a depth of at least 60 centimetres,” he said. “The only systems found not to meet the 15-metre setback distance were on sites that did not have 15 metres to water — island sites.” Kohlsmith recommended continuing with a re-inspection program with a mail-out by May 5, complete parklands inspections in the last week of August, the use of soil probes for locating new privy sites and the removal of “tables” in park lands sites near the shoreline to mitigate the washing of dishes and other grey-water sources. The full report is available in the agenda package on the North Frontenac website     • • • Fire Chief/Director of Emergency Services Eric Korhonen showed Council one of three packages (with four quilts each) that the Trinity Quilters of Verona have donated to the North Frontenac Fire Department and one package to the Kaladar/Barrie Fire Department. “The Trinity Quilters have requested that the quilts be provided to individuals at emergency scenes who require warmth and comfort,” he said. “The quilts will be retained by the individuals who receive them.” “They told us to let them know when we use one and they’ll replace it,” said CAO Cheryl Robson. “Any any local quilting groups are welcome to donate if they’re interested.”   • • • Coun. Gerry Martin had quite a bit of feedback for Mayor Ron Higgins’ report on North Frontenac’s strategic plan, especially when it came to backing more boat launches instead of trails initiatives. But Martin saved his best comments for the ‘values’ section where Higgins urged Council to be pleasant, accommodating, rational and show respect for all. “I hope you’re not asking everybody to agree on everything — that’s not why we’re here,” Martin said. “If we’re still around (after this year’s election), I’d still like to discuss this whole structure,” said Coun. John Inglis. “I didn’t know much about strategic plans four years ago and was skeptical about their usefulness. “I’m a little better on them now.”

North Frontenac to look at options for planning services

North Frontenac will be revisiting how it handles planning following a discussion at its regular meeting last Friday in Ompah. Currently, planning work (subdivisions, condominiums, severances, minor variances, etc) is handled by Frontenac County on behalf of the Township. But a recent report from director of planning and economic development Joe Gallivan says that the current workload leads to an unacceptable amount of overtime and therefore justifies the hiring of a junior planner with a salary in the range of $90,000 per year. Gallivan’s report suggests that salary should come out of the County levy but also acknowledges that that might not be approved by County Council as the services provided would only be applicable to Central Frontenac, North Frontenac and Frontenac Islands. South Frontenac has its own planning department. Mayor Ron Higgins agreed in a report to Council that the position should be covered by the County levy and also that that might not be approved by County Council. “For North Frontenac, the priority today is an updated Zoning Bylaw (the current one is from 2004) which we wanted to have completed this past spring,” Higgins said. “I recommend we issue an RFP and hire a consultant to update our Zoning Bylaw to ensure that we have a Zoning Bylaw that meets the Building Code, other legislation and Official Plan requirements by spring 2018.” “I don’t think a County planner should be making field trips on every application,” said Coun. Gerry Martin. “Our committee of adjustment is quite capable of making site visits. “The County planner is wasting its resources (and) there’s a real deficit in management.” “We should have a discussion on whether to stay with County planning or hire a contract planner,” said Higgins. Central Frontenac Council had a similar discussion at a recent meeting. • • • North Frontenac will continue to review its strategic plan in the new year. “This is a big document and I don’t think we’ve had the time to review it adequately,” said Coun. John Inglis. “I’d like to see it accepted provisionally.” “We need it for the budget,” said Mayor Ron Higgins. “I’m glad to see something about seniors housing in there (but) I feel it’s mainly your document,” said Inglis. “We haven’t had much discussion and I have something about the budget I’d like to get in there.” “The main thing is affordable seniors housing (which was added by amendment),” said Higgins. “We’ll continue to review it in the new year.”   • • • Following a public meeting on the subject, Council approved changes to the Fees and Charges Bylaw. The fee for a Private Lane Name Sign increases to $400 from $250. The Entrance Permit fee changes to $70 from $40. The Blue Box Recycling Bin fee changes to $10 from $7. The Composter fee changes to $40 from $30. Township ball caps are $8.85.   • • • After Council considered some funding requests, Coun. Gerry Martin wondered aloud: “how come we never see any requests from GREC (Granite Ridge Education Centre in Sharbot Lake that many North Frontenac residents attend)? Are they not aware that we give out grants?” “They will be as of Thursday,” said Mayor Ron Vandewal, while watching The Frontenac News reporter scribbling down Martin’s words.

Ontario Municipal Partnership fund targets fiscally challenged townships

When the Ontario Liberal government took power in 2003, one of the key issues for municipal governments was dealing with all of the downloaded costs that had been one of the features of municipal amalgamation under the previous Conservative administration under Mike Harris. The municipal share of costs for social programs, ambulance service, policing, and other services had increased or been instituted for the first time. While the McGuinty, and now the Wynne Liberals have not taken uploaded entire sectors as municipalities had wished, they have uploaded some costs. They also brought in, early in their first mandate, a funding program aimed at helping more vulnerable municipalities cope with the cost of uploaded services. Over time, the program, which is now called the Ontario Municipal Partnership Fund (OMPF) has become focussed on helping rural, remote and financially challenged municipalities cope with a variety of costs. The program includes a rural communities grant, a fiscal circumstances grant, and an assessment equalization grant. The way the program works in 2018, larger municipalities (in relative terms) such as South Frontenac, which has over 10,000 households and an average property assessment of $307,000, will receive $1.52 million in 2018, up slightly from $1.49 in 2017. A smaller township, such as Addington Highlands, with 2,500 households and an average property assessment of $177,000 will be receiving $2.04 million, up from $1.8 million in 2017. To illustrate the realtive impact of the grant on the two townships budgets, the OMPF grant for South Frontenac equals less than 8% of the amount council collects from taxpayers, whereas in Addington Highlands it equals about 75%. North Frontenac Township will receive $1.6 million in OMPF payments in 2018, up $240,000 from the $1.4 million that they received last year. There are 3,500 households listed for North Frontenac at an average value of $250,000. Central Frontenac Township will receive $2.05 million in 2018, up $75,000 from $193 million in 2017. There are 4,100 households in Central Frontenac, at an average value of $218,000.

Mississippi News

(note – this was missed in the newspaper this week. Much apologies to all of the great Pearl Killingbeck fans – ps she is our favourite columnist as well, but don’t tell anybody because it is a secret) What a great get together at the Maples on Wednesday December 6 for Harriett Riddell’s 84th birthday. 15 people attended, it was a great meal as usual. Thank you Elaine for the beautiful carrot cake you always make, and everyone loves. (The staff at the Maples always love it too!) Happy birthday Harriett, we wish you many many more. Friday morning at Coffee Break was the community doing it together. There was a great crowd. It was nice to see Joelle and Don’s son Scott out enjoying a coffee. He lives in Orillia, Ontario. Get well wishes go out to Allan Massey. Happy December Birthday wishes to Anne and Allen Massey, Karen Paterson, Harriet Riddell, Morley, Colton and Cooper Wark. Tip of the hat this week goes out to Glen Paterson. Thank you for cleaning up all the garbage around the mailboxes. You did a great job. Don’t forget music night at Snow Road Community Centre on Thursday December 14 from 7 until 9. Al Tuck and Joey Wright will be playing. Tickets are $10, All Welcome. There will be a light lunch served. There will be a Community Christmas Banquet sponsored by the Mississippi Free Methodist Church at Snow Road Snowmobile Club, 1106 Gemmill Rd, December 15, 2017 at 6pm. Adults $15, children 6-12 $7.50. Under 6 free. Back Forty Artisan Cheese  is having a Holiday Open House on Saturday December 16 from 10am -4pm at Mississippi Station on the Gully Road. Come pick up your holiday cheeses and charcuterie and warm up by the fire pit with a hot cup of cider. The Snow Road Snowmobile Club will be hosting a Christmas dinner and evening of social entertainment. On December 16 starting at 6pm. Advance Tickets are required, they’re $15 and you can call Ruth at 613-278-0477 or Alice at 613-278-1020 to acquire them. The Sharbot Lake Diners is on December 20 at noon at the United Church Hall. It will be a turkey dinner, with all the trimmings, catered by Itty Bitty Bites. If you want to go and you haven’t registered, call 613-279-3151. You’ll be happy you did. December 17 will be White Gift Sunday organized by the Lanark Churches to collect food or gifts for less fortunate families in the Lanark area. Also December 17 will be food bank Sunday at the Elphin & McDonald's Corners Churches. Congratulations to Scott Gemmill and Allison Carruthers who eloped on Friday December 8 at Fire Valley, Grand Canyon, Nevada. You sure pulled one over all of us. So happy for you and wish you both many years of happiness. The Gemmill family celebrated their Christmas at Walter and Marie’s in Perth. There were 42 people, and now 4 generations again. Sympathy to the Crain family on the death of their eldest brother Guy Welsh of Staynor.

CENTRAL FRONTENAC NEWS

Kurt Thompson’s team takes bragging rights in 4 on 4 shinny tourney for minor ball

Kurt Thompson’s team takes bragging rights in 4 on 4 shinny tourney for minor ball

Minor softball has held a fundraising 4 on 4 hockey tournament for several years now at the outdoor rink in Tichborne but last year the weather didn’t cooperate and so it had to be cancelled. This year, organizers decided to move it up a couple of weeks. Sure enough, the ...

Death at Tichborne – Debra Teal dies after being dropped off at her home by OPP – SIU investigating

49 year old Debra Anne Hill (Teal) was found by her son in-law Owen Young early on Saturday morning outside of her home on Steele Road near Tichborne, and was declared deceased by Emergency Srevices personnel a short time later. As reported in the OPP and Special Investigation Unit (SIU) releases reprinted below, there had been unusual circumstances late on the evening before she died. A query by The News to the SIU regarding cause of death after a post-mortem reportedly took place on Monday, led to the following response from Monica Hudon, Communications co-ordinator with the SIU: “The results of a post-mortem are considered evidence. The SIU does not comment on, confirm, or share any specific evidence the Unit may have gathered during the course of its investigation until the investigation is completed.” There is no information available about how long that investigation will take. Here is the OPP release from Saturday. OPP Investigate Death - SIU Invoke Mandate Members of the Ontario Provincial Police (OPP) Frontenac Detachment, along with the OPP Criminal Investigation Branch (CIB), are currently investigating the death of a 49-year-old female in South Frontenac Township. In the early morning hours of January 13, 2018, officers had provided assistance to this female. Shortly before 9 a.m., Emergency Medical Services contacted the OPP for assistance for a sudden death in South Frontenac Township. The OPP has notified the province's Special Investigations Unit (SIU) which has invoked its mandate. As a result the OPP will not be able to provide any further information. The Special Investigation Unit then put out the following release on Sunday, January 14. At approximately 1 a.m. on Saturday, January 13, 2018, Ontario Provincial Police officers came across a suspicious vehicle in the Frontenac area. The driver fled on foot, but police encountered a woman outside of the vehicle. The officers transported her to her residence and left. At approximately 5:30 a.m., emergency responders attended the woman’s residence. She was found deceased. At this time, two investigators and one forensic investigator have been assigned to this incident. The SIU is an arm’s length agency that investigates reports involving police where there has been death, serious injury or allegations of sexual assault. Under the Police Services Act, the Director of the SIU must consider whether an officer has committed a criminal offence in connection with the incident under investigation. depending on the evidence, lay a criminal charge against the officer if appropriate, or close the file without any charges being laid. report the results of any investigations to the Attorney General. In the meantime, Debra Teal’s husband Kevin and three children, Jesse, Chantel and Frank, as well as father in law Levi, have organised a celebration of her life is set for the Oso Hall on Saturday from noon to 3pm. Debbie Teal will be missed by the local community and in nearby Sharbot Lake, where she worked for a number of years at the Sharbot Lake Senior’s Home before it closed. She then took a job with the Rainbow Valley Group Home. She also provided care for ailing family members. Related: Rampant vandalism on Bob’s Lake.

Change is good for guitar player McCullough

“Life’s good,” said guitarist Shawn McCullough in between sets Saturday night at The Crossing Pub in Sharbot Lake, where he and fiddle player Wade Foster played to a sold-out audience that contained more than a few musicians. “I’ve got a good chunk of 2018 booked already with 125 gigs. “I did just over 200 last year.” After years of fragile bands and being a chicken-picker for hire, McCullough seems to have settled into the roving troubadour mode. “I’m honestly enjoying the acoustic thing,” he said. “The biggest worry is trying to find some tasty old covers that haven’t been done to death. I’m looking to bluegrass for a lot of that.” He’s also doing a lot of songwriting too, looking at an album in the spring. “I drive home in silence after gigs,” he said. “There’s not much new on country radio I want to listen to these days and so I use that time to write songs. Well, work them out in the car and write them down when I get home.” He’s got studio time booked in February and while he plans to record all original material this time around, he’s not in any rush and plans to take it one song at a time. “It’s really tough to release to radio these days,” he said. “So if I can get songs out one at a time, so be it. But I’m writing some with Wade and I’m really feeling confident about songwriting right now.” “At the CCMAs after-party, I was backing up Brea Lawrenson in the songwriting circle and she gave me one of her three songs so I did Change.” McCullough said you work harder as a solo act, likening it to a marathon rather than a sprint, but it has its advantages. “Well, you’re not worried about people making the gig,” he said. “And you can think about the next one more.” And then there’s the gear thing. “I started having problems with my neck and so you have to adapt,” he said. “So I got a smaller Bose PA and now I can walk through the door carrying all the gear I need.”

49 year old woman found dead in Tichborne

OPP Investigate Death SIU Invoke Mandate  Members of the Ontario Provincial Police (OPP) Frontenac Detachment, along with the OPP Criminal Investigation Branch (CIB), are currently investigating the death of a 49-year-old female in South Frontenac Township.   In the early morning hours of January 13, 2018, officers had provided assistance to this female. Shortly before 9 a.m., Emergency Medical Services contacted the OPP for assistance for a sudden death in South Frontenac Township.  The OPP has notified the province's Special Investigations Unit (SIU) which has invoked its mandate. As a result the OPP will not be able to provide any further information. Any other inquiries should be directed to SIU Communications at (416) 622-2342. The Spicial Investigatgions unit put out the following release earlier today (January 14) Although OPP have not released the name of the woman,it is well known in the local community that she is Debra Teal (nee Hill) of Steele Road in Tichborne, a well known local mother and grandmother who worked for years at the Sharbot Lake Senior's Home (The News extends our condolences to the family)  The province’s Special Investigations Unit is investigating the circumstances surrounding the death of a 49-year-old woman today in Tichborne.   Preliminary information suggests the following: At approximately 1 a.m. on Saturday, January 13, 2018, Ontario Provincial Police officers came across a suspicious vehicle in the Frontenac area. The driver fled on foot, but police encountered a woman outside of the vehicle. The officers transported her to her residence and left. At approximately 5:30 a.m., emergency responders attended the woman’s residence. She was found deceased.   At this time, two investigators and one forensic investigator have been assigned to this incident.   The SIU is urging anyone who may have information about this investigation to contact the lead investigator at 1-800-787-8529. The Unit is also urging anyone who may have any video evidence related to this incident to upload that video through the SIU website.   The SIU is an arm’s length agency that investigates reports involving police where there has been death, serious injury or allegations of sexual assault. Under the Police Services Act, the Director of the SIU must consider whether an officer has committed a criminal offence  in connection with the incident under investigation depending on the evidence, lay a criminal charge against the officer if appropriate or close the file without any charges being laid report the results of any investigations to the Attorney General. 

Arden, Sharbot Lake Legions combine to alternate monthly open mikes

Arden Legion President Dave Moore kind of said it all: “this open mike is scheduled from 1-4 but since everybody’s having such a good time, I’d like to remind you we don’t close until 2 a.m.” Such was the inaugural session for a series of open mike fundraisers to alternate on the first Saturday of each month between the Arden and Sharbot Lake Legion branches. The next installment is scheduled for Feb. 3 in Sharbot Lake. Sam Jarvis, who organized the backing band of himself, Eddie Aston, Bill Parsons and Zack Teal, said the idea came out of a similar fundraiser Connie McLellan did for children with mental challenges. “We wanted to keep it going so her husband, Sharbot Lake Legion President Alden McLellan, said ‘let’s work with Arden on this.’” And so they did. Funds generated from the monthly events will go to both Legions’ causes and Jarvis is selling T-shirts and CDs to raise funds to add to the PA system. The place was packed for this first one.

SOUTH FRONTENAC NEWS

Rampant vandalism on Bob’s Lake.

Rampant vandalism on Bob’s Lake.

Eleven cottages on Maple Lane, Meadow Lane, and Maple Grove Crescent were vandalised by perpetrators on an ATV last Friday night between sometime before 9pm and 11pm. Patio and garage doors were smashed by the ATV, and the vandals destroyed tv’s and mirrors, emptied fire ex...

Fire Chief Chesebrough Retires

When Council reconvened from a closed session for their regular meeting, CAO Orr announced that they had just accepted Fire Chief Rick Chesebrough’s resignation; after more than 14 years of service for the township, Chesebrough will be leaving at the end of this week. Later, Orr said this did not come as a surprise; “It’s been in the works for some time now: he did the math, and realized he was eligible.” On behalf of Council, Mayor Vandewal congratulated Chesebrough, wishing him “many years of health and happiness.” Council then passed a motion to appoint Terry Gervais as acting fire chief. Support for Seniors Active Living CentreFollowing last week’s presentation by David Townsend of SFCSC, Council moved to allocate 20% of the net annual operating costs to support SFCSC’s proposed Seniors Active Living Centre funding application, to a maximum of $12,000 annually over the next three years in a combination of cash and in-kind services to be negotiated annually with the Township.” It has been suggested that with the ongoing support of the township, the SFCSC Board may wish to consider inviting a member of Council to sit on their Board. Tax Sale PolicyCouncil approved a revised tax sale policy which incorporates the legislative changes from Bill 68. Two related by-laws authorized the treasurer to enter into extension agreements and provided for an administration fee to be charged once the tax sale process is undertaken. Details about the sale of properties in tax arrears and a flow chart describing the process are available on the Township website, or at the Township office. Township Granted $80,882 for Commuter Cycling ProgramThe township’s application through the Public Works department for funding from the Ontario Municipal Commuter Cycling Program has been successful: it will be applied to one of two projects planned for this coming year: fully paved bike lanes between Harrowsmith and Sydenham, or a bike lane adjoining a pedestrian sidewalk along the south side Bedford Road between the end of George Street and Alton Road in Sydenham. Public Works Manager Segsworth also plans to fit in a bike lane on the north side of Bedford; Mayor Vandewal questioned whether this might narrow a busy stretch of road too much. Segsworth replied that because of the busyness of the road, it was also a very dangerous stretch for bicycles. Storrington Centre UpgradesCouncil directed staff to issue an RFP for improvements to the Storrington Centre, to include a new optic system, accessible washrooms and entrances, kitchen upgrades and a new folding wall. $333,000 has been approved in the 2018 capital budget, for this. Councillor Sleeth thanked the Township’s Public Works staff and the Storrington Recreation Committee for all their help in planning the project. Back-up Generator for OPP StationCouncil has approved purchase of a backup generator to provide overall backup power for the OPP building at Hartington. This had been held up when Councillor Revill questioned whether a second generator was needed. Further investigation showed that the existing generator on site at the OPP station only provides fire pump back-up power for the sprinkler system. BrieflyOn the recommendation of Corporate Services Committee, Council agreed to extend the contract with Frontenac Municipal Law Enforcement Inc. for a further two years from March 1, 2018 to Feb 28, 2020. The 2018 members to serve on the Committee of Adjustment will be: Al Revill, Ross Sutherland, Brad Barbeau and Ron Sleeth. There being no further questions for the planner, Council approved the zoning of a new waterfront lot on South Basin of Buck Lake, Loughborough district. Council adopted the Corporate Services Committee’s recommendation to maintain the Township’s current investment strategy and to issue an RFP for investment advisory services. A proposed by-law to amend speed limits on Rutledge Road was, on Councillor Revill’s recommendation, referred to the Public Works Committee for discussion.

Tackling dementia in Frontenac County

Pam Morey knows dementia is random, relentless and frighteningly common. Speaking from her administrative office at Frontenac Arena in mid-January, Morey is passionate about building a strong and healthy community, one issue at a time. “I think we should all share more information. It makes us more united,” said the 49-year-old. Known for her work as President of the Harrowsmith and District Social & Athletic Club, and the Chair of South Frontenac Recreation 2017 & 2018, Morey is working to increase the community’s awareness of dementia. “I want to let people know there is support out there,” she explains. “To give people better tools to communicate and understand people with dementia.” Considered a serious health problem in Frontenac County and across Canada, dementia is a general term for a decline in mental ability severe enough to interfere with daily life. Memory loss is an example. Alzheimer's is the most common type of dementia, making up 50 to 70 per cent of cases. Common symptoms include emotional problems, problems with language, and a decrease in motivation “We’re inviting people to learn about dementia, behaviours, how you can help to reduce stigma, support those living with dementia and their families,” says Morey about the free dementia friendly training at the club’s hall in Harrowsmith on Jan. 24. “This training is for everyone who works or volunteers in the community,” she explains. “If you deal with the community, you should be at this meeting. It is also open to anyone interested in being more educated about this disease.” Grateful to call Harrowsmith home, Morey hopes to make Frontenac County closer and stronger with education and communication. “I love being a part of this community,” she confirms. “I’m proud to be a part of the Social and Athletic club which offers local entertainment and recreation. These activities bring us together and give us opportunities to meet our neighbours.” Married with children, she adds, “I feel we should all be involved in our community so we can support and help each other. This training is a good education piece because the rate of aging people is going up. Young people need to be better educated about this issue and how to relate to people with dementia.” The workshop is being held in January to coincide with Alzheimer Awareness Month. The community is encouraged to show its support of the Kingston, Frontenac, Lennox and Addington Alzheimer Society by joining a coffee break at the Frontenac Arena this Saturday and Sunday (Jan. 20 and 21). Coffee proceeds from 7 am to 10 pm will be donated to the society. The dementia friendly training will be held from 7 to 8:30 pm on Jan. 24 at the club hall, located at 4041 Colebrook Road in Harrowsmith. To register, please contact Pam Morey at 613-929-7003 or write This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

German longsword historical tradition lives on in Bellrock

When you think ‘martial arts,’ chances are your thoughts tend towards the Orient. When weapons are concerned, in particular, swords, the long, curved, slashing blade of the samurai — the katana — usually comes to mind, doesn’t it? However, there is a long-standing tradition of European martial arts as well and Enterprise’s Robert MacLeod is dedicated to preserving and promoting that tradition. MacLeod, an anthropologist by trade who teaches at St. Lawrence College in Kingston, is also head instructor at Ironwood Sword School. He runs several classes and is currently beginning an eight-week session at the Bellrock Hall in German Longsword for youths ages 10 and up on Saturday mornings with the motto “Strength, Flexibility, Growth.” For those unfamiliar with the German martial art, it is a combat system taught during the 1300s by Johannes Liechtenauer. “There were two schools of longsword, the other being Italian,” MacLeod said. “Actually there was also an English tradition but that wasn’t written down. “And a big part of what we do is teaching the techniques that come from Liechtenauer and a number of his students. We try to stay close to the historical manuscripts.” In addition to longsword techniques, MacLeod also includes dagger and wrestling in the Historical European Martial Arts (HEMA) tradition. “Knives were actually my first love, I started collecting them when I was younger, and then in university I joined the fencing club and started doing sabre,” he said. “But soon after I joined, it went electric and good, clean cuts became flicks in order to score.” As a young boy, he had taken judo classes and so returned to the Eastern martial arts traditions to study tae-kwon do for several years. “But then, my son bought a collectable sword and my wife said ‘if he’s going to have it, he should know how to use it,’” MacLeod said. “So, in 2008, we found a group of guys in the park playing with swords and we discovered HEMA.” That led him to join a local study group working in the German longsword tradition and he was hooked. “A lot of people really don’t know the longsword,” he said. “It’s a lot lighter than you might think — less than three pounds and just under three feet (blade). “And it’s a cutting weapon a lot more like a katana than it is like a club, which it often portrayed as in movies.” MacLeod said he has no problem teaching beginners and has all the equipment needed for novice level students. All the beginners have to have is loose, comfortable clothes (no shorts), flat-soled, non-marking shoes and a pair of thin leather gloves. The Bellrock classes begin this Saturday (there was actually a class last Saturday but he’s prepared to start again because of the weather issues last week). It’s $100 for an eight-week term, which should take most students through the novice rank to the scholar rank. While the Bellrock classes are specifically for youths, MacLeod said he’s happy to start a class for adults anywhere in the area if there are four willing students. Contact MacLeod at 613-358-9642 or www.irnwood.ca for more information. “Swords are cool,” he said.           Robert MacLeod runs Benjamin and Anna Tucker through a series of thrusts and parries at the Bellrock Hall, as part of his ongoing series of German longsword classes. Photo/Craig Bakay

German longsword historical tradition lives on in Bellrock

When you think ‘martial arts,’ chances are your thoughts tend towards the Orient. When weapons are concerned, in particular, swords, the long, curved, slashing blade of the samurai — the katana — usually comes to mind, doesn’t it? However, there is a long-standing tradition of European martial arts as well and Enterprise’s Robert MacLeod is dedicated to preserving and promoting that tradition. MacLeod, an anthropologist by trade who teaches at St. Lawrence College in Kingston, is also head instructor at Ironwood Sword School. He runs several classes and is currently beginning an eight-week session at the Bellrock Hall in German Longsword for youths ages 10 and up on Saturday mornings with the motto “Strength, Flexibility, Growth.” For those unfamiliar with the German martial art, it is a combat system taught during the 1300s by Johannes Liechtenauer. “There were two schools of longsword, the other being Italian,” MacLeod said. “Actually there was also an English tradition but that wasn’t written down. “And a big part of what we do is teaching the techniques that come from Liechtenauer and a number of his students. We try to stay close to the historical manuscripts.” In addition to longsword techniques, MacLeod also includes dagger and wrestling in the Historical European Martial Arts (HEMA) tradition. “Knives were actually my first love, I started collecting them when I was younger, and then in university I joined the fencing club and started doing sabre,” he said. “But soon after I joined, it went electric and good, clean cuts became flicks in order to score.” As a young boy, he had taken judo classes and so returned to the Eastern martial arts traditions to study tae-kwon do for several years. “But then, my son bought a collectable sword and my wife said ‘if he’s going to have it, he should know how to use it,’” MacLeod said. “So, in 2008, we found a group of guys in the park playing with swords and we discovered HEMA.” That led him to join a local study group working in the German longsword tradition and he was hooked. “A lot of people really don’t know the longsword,” he said. “It’s a lot lighter than you might think — less than three pounds and just under three feet (blade). “And it’s a cutting weapon a lot more like a katana than it is like a club, which it often portrayed as in movies.” MacLeod said he has no problem teaching beginners and has all the equipment needed for novice level students. All the beginners have to have is loose, comfortable clothes (no shorts), flat-soled, non-marking shoes and a pair of thin leather gloves. The Bellrock classes begin this Saturday (there was actually a class last Saturday but he’s prepared to start again because of the weather issues last week). It’s $100 for an eight-week term, which should take most students through the novice rank to the scholar rank. While the Bellrock classes are specifically for youths, MacLeod said he’s happy to start a class for adults anywhere in the area if there are four willing students. Contact MacLeod at 613-358-9642 or www.irnwood.ca for more information. “Swords are cool,” he said.           Robert MacLeod runs Benjamin and Anna Tucker through a series of thrusts and parries at the Bellrock Hall, as part of his ongoing series of German longsword classes. Photo/Craig Bakay

FRONTENAC COUNTY NEWS

EOWC elects Chair, Vice-Chair and sets priorities for 2018

EOWC elects Chair, Vice-Chair and sets priorities for 2018

The Eastern Ontario Wardens’ Caucus (EOWC), at its annual inaugural meeting held last week in Kingston, elected Warden Robin Jones as the 2018 Chair and Warden Jennifer Murphy as the 2018 Vice-Chair. Robin Jones is the Warden of the United Counties of Leeds and Grenville, ...

Municipal election watch

Vandewal, Higgins, and Smith are all running again, Hogg, Doyle, are mulling retirement   Maybe they are gluttons for punishment, or maybe it is the awesome power of the office, or maybe it takes two kicks at the can before fatigue sets in, but all three one term Mayors in Frontenac County have decided, barring anything unforeseen, that they will run again when the municipal election rolls around in October. North Frontenac Mayor Ron Higgins, announced a year ago, half way though his mandate, that he intended to seek a second term, and he confirmed that decision this week. South Frontenac Mayor Ron Vandewal made his decision over Christmas, with a little help from his wife Nancy. “I had been saying I’m 50-50 on it for a while, and then over Christmas Nancy said, ‘why don’t you make up your mind one way or another’ and so I thought about it and I’m ready to stand for a second term,” he said, when contacted early this week. Central Frontenac Mayor Frances Smith said she will be running again for a second term. In Frontenac Islands, two time Mayor Dennis Doyle is undecided. “I felt it was important that I run last time because it was clear there would be some new Mayors and new members of Frontenac County Council coming in and I felt it was important for continuity, but this time there might not be as much turnover with the other three Mayor’s all running again. But I will wait and see what happens before deciding,” he said early this week. Meanwhile, over in Addington Highlands, Reeve Henry Hogg said he has also not yet decided whether he will run again or not. Four years ago he said this would be his last term, but now that the election year is getting underway he said he has not made a final decision. “I am waiting to see who comes forward,” he said, noting that the election rules have changed. “I don’t think nominations even open until May 1st this time,” he said., There have been numerous changes to the election rules since 2014. Not only has the opening day for nominations been pushed back from January 1st until May 1st, the nomination period is tighter on the other end as well. Nominations will close on July 27th, instead of September 10th and in order to be nominated candidates will need 25 signatures from eligible voters this time, a requirement that was not in place in 2014. The 25 signature requirement applies to candidates for Mayor (Reeve) and to candidates for Council and school board trustee One thing that has not changed is the ability of candidates to change the position they are seeking up until the close of nominations. Until the 27th, candidates can change the position they are seeking, either from Council to Mayor or vice versa, and candidates for council can also change the ward they are seeking to represent. The 25 signatures do not need to be changed if the candidate changes the position they are contesting.

KFLA Public Health turns its attention to radon

Kieran Moore, the Medical Officer of Health For Kingston, Frontenac, Lennox and Addington, is concerned about radon gas, seeing it as a major public health risk. Radon is an odourless, colourless gas that that is produced by the decay of uranium found in rocks, soil and water. Buildings that are constructed on substrates with high concentrations of radon can create a draw for the gas, which seeps in, and can concentrate in the ground floor, and especially in basements. It does note readily migrate to the upper floors of houses, and is most prevalent in basements, but can be circulated through houses through heating and air-conditioning systems. It is a major causal factor in the development of lung cancer, having been shown to be responsible for 16% of lung cancer deaths in Canada, according toa report called Radon: Poilcy Considerations, that was presented to members of the Board of KFL&A Public Health in October. It is the second most deadly environmental carcinogen in Ontario, according to a report published in 2016 by Public Health Ontario and Cancer Care Ontario. Between 1090 and 1550 lung cancer deaths in Ontario are attributable to radon exposure each year. The most deadly environmental carcinogen is the solar UV radiation, which is associated with 2100 and 3000 deaths from melanoma each year. Radon levels vary according to geography, and in the KFL&A region 11% of homes tested contained over 200 Becquerells per cubic metre, the level where human health can be compromised, according to the government of Canada. The provincial average is 4.6%, making the issue of extra concern in KFL&A “It should be noted,” said Keiran Moore in a telephone interview last week, “that there is no safe level of exposure to radon, and that in Europe the target is set at 100”. Moore added that he would have thought that “the levels would be higher on the Canadian Shield portion of the region,” but the studies that were done showed as much exposure on the limestone substrate as on the granite. To put the risk posed by radiation exposure into context, Moore said that continued exposure to radon over time brings the of developing cancer among non-smokers to 1 in 15. The risk for the population as a whole is about 1 in 300 according to an article published in July o fthis year by Dr. Lynne Eldridge on the website Verywell.com. The lung cancer risk for smokers, which is 1 in 9, is greatly increased when smokers are exposed to radon over time, rising to 1 in 3, according to Dr. Moore. “Now that our smoking rates are coming down, we are making headway with lung cancer, which is our number one killer” said Moore. “As this happens, radon, the second most important causal factor, is more and more in our sights.” The report to the KFL&A Board of Health looks at what the health unit can do to begin scaling back the impacts of radon on residents, in our own region and province wide. “Exposure can be effectively prevented through well-established radon-specific building measures.” which, the report says “are easy to install during the construction process of new homes and costs approximately $500. However it is more difficult to retrofit an existing building and the expense rises to $1,200 to $5,000.” Dr. Moore said that the first step for residents is to test for radon. There are kits available at hardware stores at a reasonable price. There are short term and long term tests available. Brooks Gee, a regional manager for Mr. Radon, a mitigation company, said that the long term kits that are available are generally better than the one time kits. He also said that the place to test in a house is the lowest occupied level. “If the basement is only used for storage and laundry, it is best to test in the kitchen, but if the basement is occupied, I would test there, said Gee. Gee also said that his experience dovetails with the studies that have found radon is prevalent throughout the region, regardless of whether the substrate is limestone or granite, but “although it is not scientific I would say the 11% figure for high levels is low,” he said. Currently only 4% of Canadians have had their homes tested. Homeowners who are living in homes that are less than 7 years old should test immediately, because through the new home warranty act, Tarion covers 100% of the cost of mitigation for radon for the first 7 years. Public Health will be advocating for changes to the Ontario Building code requesting that radon specific building measures be adopted in the code when it is amended next year,. But municipalities need not wait that long. According to the policy report, Public Health can pursue “advocating to municipalities in our region to adopt radon-specific measures in the National Building Cose as bylaws, in the way that it is done in the City of Guelph, Central Elgin, St. Thomas and Thunder Bay.” Other immediate measures that can be taken are testing all schools and daycares for radon, and the report also urges the Board to advocate that the threshold be lowered to 100Bq/M³ from 200Bq/M³ to bring Canada in compliance with the threshold level that is recommended by the World Health Organisation. Starting in the new year, the KFL&A Public Health should pursue a “multipronged strategy to reduce radon exposure for residents in the KFL&A region. These efforts are an investment towards achieving an enduring reduction in the rate of radon-related lung cancer deaths in our region,” the poluicy report concludes. Dr. Moore said that in response to the report, he made a “promise to the board to come up with concrete best practices. I hope over the next six months we will be able to have the best practices in play. We are bringing in provincial and federal experts to do this.”   This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Parades in high gear on a mild Saturday

These bucket drummers were representing Rural Frontenac Community Services, youth division at the Santa Claus Parade in Sharbot Lake on Saturday afternoon,. The mild weather meant there was not snow, but no frozen fingers either. There were parades in Northrbook, Harrowsmith on Saturday morning, the Sharbot Lake Parade at 1pm and the Denbigh Parade in the evening (6pm). On Sunday, the Tichborne to Parham parade is set for 1pm as well.

The Frontenac Gazette falls victim to corporate swap, shuts down

The Frontenac Gazette (and its sister publication, the Kingston Heritage) ceased publication Monday as corporate media giants Postmedia and Torstar completed a deal to swap newspapers and subsequently close the vast majority of them down.Staff at The Gazette/Heritage were called to a meeting Monday morning and told they had until noon to clean out their desks. Torstar, through its Metroland Media wing, traded both papers along with eight community papers in the Ottawa area, the St. Lawrence News, three in the Belleville area and 10 other publications to Postmedia in exchange for eight community publications, seven dailies and two free dailies. Postmedia will continue to publish one of its acquisitions. Torstar will continue to publish four of the dailies. The Kingston Heritage started publication in 1975. Joe Cembal, who has owned many papers in Central and Eastern Ontario, began the Heritage in response to requests from community leaders in Amherstview after the Whig-Standard had turned them down. Cembal was the publisher but his wife Gail actually ran the paper, serving as general manager until their son Darryl took over in 1988. In 1991, the Cembals saw a way to produce a rural paper as an add-on market for its Kingston Heritage advertisers and The South Frontenac Gazette was born. In July of 2001, the Gazette expanded into Central and North Frontenac and changed its name to The Frontenac Gazette. It later pulled back from North Frontenac. In 2009, Performance Printing in Smiths Falls bought the two papers and Darryl Cembal continued as publisher for a short time before moving on. During Performance Printing’s ownership, the Gazette acquired the EMC (which stood for Expanded Market Coverage) title in its masthead. In 2011, Performance Printing was sold to Metroland and eventually the EMC disappeared from the masthead. Just last January, both the Gazette and Heritage underwent a redesign. Understandably, Darryl Cembal was saddened to hear of the demise of the publications his family built. “After 40 years, it’s disheartening that family owned newspapers have gone by the wayside,” Cembal said. “Not only were they owned by a conglomerate, they were closed by a conglomerate. “For a good news product that’s actually still needed in the community, it’s too bad. “But it was a corporate decision and it is what it is.” (Editors note 1 This week's Gazette had been completed and submitted to the printers before the Monday morning meeting, but it is unclear if it was printed and is being distributed. The articles were posted online before the shutdown.) (Editors note 2. Craig Bakay was a long time employee of the Frontenac Gazette. He worked there until the end of 2016, and subsequently came to work at the Frontenac News.)

ADDINGTON HIGHLANDS NEWS

Addington Highlands Council in the dark as to what legal pot will mean

Addington Highlands Council in the dark as to what legal pot will mean

A request from the Too Far, Too Fast organization for Addington Highlands to declare itself an ‘unwilling host’ for any marijuana distribution operations once it becomes legal July 1 seemed to garner the most discussion at Council’s regular meeting Tuesday after...

Tim Trickey, devoted cadet leader, dies of cancer

Tim Trickey was well known in the Land O’Lakes region for his tireless efforts to to start up and maintain a cadet program at North Addington Education Centre for kids from Addington Highlands and North Frontenac. Even after his cancer diagnosis he continued to work with the cadets and as recently as last month, he led them at the Remembrance Day Service in Flinton. He died on December 17 at the age of 51. Trickey was the co-ordinator for the volunteer ambulance service in Northbrook in the 1990’s and then served with L&A County Emergency Services as a paramedic for over 14 years. He also served on the Central Frontenac Volunteer Fire department. Tim was married for 30 years to Darlene (nee Kelford). The couple have a son, Jordan, and a late daughter, Natasha. Tim is fondly remembered by his extended family, friends & co-workers. Tim's family will receive friends at the Milestone Funeral Center, 11928 Hwy 41 Northbrook on Friday from 2-4pm & 7-9pm. A Celebration of Life & Tribute Service will be in the Chapel on Saturday, December 23, 2017 at 1:00pm with visitation 1hr prior to the service. A Gofundme campaign is underway to help Tim’s family.

Land O’Lakes Tourist Association closes up

It started up 74 years ago, during the second world war in 1943, when the idea of forming a marketing organization for a region that was just developing road access was pretty forward thinking. Over the years the Land O’Lakes Tourist Association (LOLTA) has seen many ups and downs, and this week in Sharbot Lake the current Board of Directors took the difficult decision to disband. Harvey Webster, the Manager of the Loughborough Inn, was the chair of LOLTA until Monday. He has been an active member and a member of the Board of Directors over the years. He said that while LOLTA is shutting down, the marketing work that it had been doing will carry on. “It was a sad situation but its not that the Land o’Lakes are disappearing. The counties and local townships have stepped in over the last few years, and the provincial Regional Tourist Organisations (RTO’s) have come on stream as well. For our members, there are still opportunities for promotion as part of a region even with us closing down,” he said. “As far as I am concerned LOLTA is not buried yet, it is more like it is more like it is on hold. If the municipalities and RTO’s step back, we will need LOLTA again.” The storied history of LOLTA was the subject of a video that was made by Ken Hook in 2013. Hook served as LOLTA manager for one year, after the departure of Terry Shea, manager between 2003 and 2008. The video outlines how the association got its start as a group of fishing lodges from Tweed, the region called “North Addington” at the time, which is now Stone Mills and Addington Highlands townships, and “North Frontenac”, which at the time referred to the region of Frontenac County north of Verona. The focus of the association was for lodges and other groups to take advantage of the opportunities that were to come as the war ended and US tourists began to look northward for fishing opportunities. Membership dues went up in 1947 to $5 per season. Over the years the association changed as new leaders came forward, two of whom, Jeanette Whitfield (1963 -1966) and Faye Henry (1979 -1996) were interviewed. They both talked about issues that were specific to their day, but also to issues that remain relevant today. For example, Henry talked about how much effort it took for the region to be noticed by various levels of government, and they both talked about the need for businesses to work together. LOLTA was able to access grant money for its members through the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs between the late 1990’s and 2010, but those programs dried up or were diverted to municipalities. The LOLTA region, which had expanded over the decades to include all Frontenac and Lennox and Addington Counties and the Municipality of Tweed, was essentially cut in half when the province of Ontario set up the RTO’s a few years ago. The Ontario Highlands Region includes North and Central Frontenac, Addington Highlands and Tweed, but Stone Mills, South Frontenac, Napanee, and Frontenac Islands are all part of the Great Waterway region. Having members split into two regional organizations did not help LOLTA, which has struggled in recent years as managers have come and gone. A couple of years ago, the LOLTA office in Kaladar was shut down and long serving office administrator Joanne Cuddy was let go. LOLTA was run out of the home office of its latest manager, Jen Fitzpatrick, until she left. The board began to consider shutting LOLTA down when they realised that, as volunteers who were all busy working on their own businesses, they did not have the energy, or finances, to carry on. I guess that the Land O’Lakes Tourist Association basically ran its course,” said Harvey Webster. “With the Internet and these other government options that there are for these businesses to be promoted, and the fact that we are a volunteer board, there was nothing for us to do but shut down.” So, just months from its 75th anniversary, LOLTA is no more.

Addington Highlands Council moves meetings to Tuesdays from Mondays

Addington Highlands Council voted to move its meetings to Tuesdays from Mondays at its regular meeting Monday afternoon in Flinton. The move was made to avoid having to schedule around holiday Mondays and to make it easier for residents to attend, said Dep. Mayor Helen Yanch. The move will come into effect for the Jan. 2, 2018 meeting and continue for meetings in both Flinton and Denbigh. Meeting times remain 1 p.m. in Flinton. Denbigh meetings are at 1 p.m. for January, February, March, November and December and 7 p.m. for the remainder of the year. The only comment on the meeting change came from Frontenac News Publisher Jeff Green, who said in an email: “Tuesdays are difficult for us to cover Addington Highlands meetings as it is our production day. We do cover other councils on that day and adding Addington Highlands will make it more of a stress. With the change, we should still be able to cover the Flinton meetings, but the evening meetings and even the afternoon meetings in Denbigh will be an issue.” “The time of the meetings should be there to serve the community,” said Coun. Tony Fritsch. “I have no issue with Monday or Tuesday.” Speed device slows trafficRoads supervisor Brett Reavie told Council that the speed measuring device on the road into Flinton seems to be having the desired effect. “Comments from neighbours are that people seem to be slowing down,” he said. “Although after awhile, it could lose its effectiveness as people get used to it being there.” “I want to see how high I can get it,” joked Reeve Henry Hogg. Hospice servicesCarrie Salsbury, community coordinator for The Heart of Hastings Hospice, addressed Council on the plan for extending their services into Addington Highlands and North Frontenac Townships. “The Local Health Integration Network has asked the Heart of Hastings Hospice to work with agencies in Lennox & Addington and Frontenac Counties to coordinate end-of-life hospice services,” she said. “I have been meeting with health care agencies, community groups, social service agencies and individuals to better understand the needs of the community and to tap into systems, services and communications links that already exist.

Denbigh ambulance service survives the latest challenge

It seems that every time Lennox and Addington County Council considers making changes or upgrades to its ambulance service, the question of whether to keep the Denbigh service up and running comes up. It happened again last week, at a meeting of Council on November 15. Council is intent on establishing a service in Stone Mills township, and one way to help finance it would be to cut the 12 hour a day service based out of Denbigh. “I am getting tired of continuing to have to argue that even though there are not a lot of calls to Denbigh, the service is essential because of the distances involved. There are also two provincial highways that meet at Denbigh, 41 and 28,” Hogg said when contacted over the phone after the meeting.” A motion was passed at an L&A Council meeting last year which instructed staff to look for a location in Denbigh where a permanent base can be constructed, but that has not led anywhere. And when the agenda came out for a discussion about the proposed Stone Mills base, one of the options on the table was cutting the Denbigh service and serving the north from the Northbrook base, which has a 24 hour a day service. At the meeting last week Council decided to proceed with a new based in Stone Mills, seek a permanent location for the Loyalist base. An in camera session followed, and after that the following motion was passed: that the current ambulance service level be maintained in Denbigh, and that council direct staff to proceed with the purchase of ambulance vehicles as required.” One of the concerns about the Denbigh service is that the current location for the ambulance is in a rental property. While the details of the in camera session were not revealed, the minutes from the meeting say that after the in camera, Warden Lowry “reported that Council considered a potential property acquisition in closed session.” Township float for Northbrook and Denbigh parades At the Santa Claus parades on December 2 in Northbrook (10 am) and Denbigh (6pm) there may be a new float. In response to a proposal by Teri Woods, the wife of township road crew member Rodney, council accepted her offer to decorate a trailer for use in both of the parades. Council will also spend $200 for candy, etc. To give out during the parades, and members of council will ride in the parades as they wish. Council meeting times set to change In response to a proposal from Councillor Helen Yanch, meetings will be held on Tuesdays starting in January. The first meeting of the month will take place on the first Tuesday of each month at the Flinton Recreation Centre at 1pm, and the second will take place in Denbigh on the 3rd Tuesday of the month. In the months of January to March, November and December, the meeting will take place at 1pm, and from April until October it will take place at 7pm.

EDITORIALS

  • Can you compare taxes between Frontenac municipalities? Maybe.
    I have often wondered why the tax rates in the Frontenac townships vary so much, and why it is that residents living in my own township, Central Frontenac, pay a much higher tax rate than anyone else. It should be easy to compare tax rates in neighbouring townships in the…
    Written on Wednesday, 17 January 2018 11:13 in Editorials
  • Election Year
    The last time we all went to the polls was for the Federal election way back in the fall of 2015, when the 10 year old Steven Harper led Conservative government was tossed out in favour of the Liberals under Justin Trudeau. This year the 14.5 year run of the…
    Written on Wednesday, 10 January 2018 12:36 in Editorials
More Editorials

LETTERS

  • Food policy Council on new workplace legislation
    I am writing as Chair of the Food Policy Council for Kingston, Frontenac, Lennox & Addington, an independent body consisting of a diverse group of people who live or work in KFL&A area. The Council’s mandate is to work towards the KFL&A's Food Charter's purpose of creating a secure and…
    Written on Wednesday, 17 January 2018 11:10 in Letters
  • Some Silent C&T Opposition
    The Mayor and a group of his friends have banded together to form something called C&T North Frontenac and are pitching the Contribute and Thrive concept to whomever will listen. If we adopt this self-rewarding dogma of Contributing (that is to give a little) in order to Thrive (that is…
    Written on Wednesday, 10 January 2018 12:35 in Letters
More Letters

Editorials


Letters


REGULAR COLUMNS


CLASSIFIEDS


OBITUARIES


FRONTENAC COUNTY


SOUTH FRONTENAC


NORTH FRONTENAC


CENTRAL FRONTENAC


ADDINGTON HIGHLANDS