Featured News

Hanging up his cleaver

Hanging up his cleaver

Written By: Jeff Green | Published: November-07-2018 | Category: SOUTH FRONTENAC
Tagged Under: Sydenham, People, Food

After 30 years in the meat department at the Trousdale’s Foodland store in Sydenham, Laurie Ross is hanging up his meat cleaver on November 18th. Laurie had not intended to retire any time soon...

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Lest We Forget: Arden Legion Creates WWI Memorial Book

Lest We Forget: Arden Legion Creates WWI Memorial Book

Flipping through the pages of the recent publication, “Lest We Forget, a book of short biographies of men who fought in the Great War with connections to Kennebec and Olden Townships,” by ...

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Chronic diseases steal function, not dignity, of local man fighting for his life

Chronic diseases steal function, not dignity, of local man fighting for his life

Written By: News Staff | Published: November-07-2018 | Category: SOUTH FRONTENAC
Tagged Under: Lyme Disease, Health, People

Gary Paquin felt alive when he held a set of drumsticks. Feeling the music pulse through his body, he played the drums with passion and pleasure. Like his father and brother, music was a large part o...

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Verona shop window a tribute to local WW I battalion

Verona shop window a tribute to local WW I battalion

Back when Verona had a Royal Canadian Legion Branch, new member Doug Lovegrove was a little concerned that there wasn’t much commemorating the First World War and in particular the 146th Oversea...

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Trinity United Church craft/bake sale has become a tradition in Verona

Trinity United Church craft/bake sale has become a tradition in Verona

Written By: Craig Bakay | Published: November-07-2018 | Category: SOUTH FRONTENAC
Tagged Under: Trinity United Church, Verona, People

Trinity United Church in Verona has been holding a craft/bake sale on the first Saturday in November for a long time now. Nobody’s really too sure how long but it’s at least 25 years, dati...

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Working group to decide closure date for Kaladar Waste Disposal site

Addington Highlands Council approved the creation of a working group to determine the fate of the Ka...

South Frontenac Council holds final meeting of term and McDougall reflects

FarewellsPresent and future Mayor Ron Vandewal made presentations to the three departing Council mem...

Educators play role in managing Diabetes

November is Diabetes Awareness Month and November 14 is World Diabetes Day. To raise awareness of di...

HPV oral cancers – let’s talk about it

As a clinical Restorative Dental Hygienist for many years, I have performed countless oral cancer sc...

Sydenham’s Haunted Walks

Rain, wind and sleet: it was the perfect setting for ghostly stories! Cold and darkness did not dete...

Author chronicles an almost fifty-year relationship between two unlikely people

Life with Dick portrays one couple’s relationship - how they met, married had children, and ha...

NAEC Trick or Eat

The students of North Addington Education Centre suited up on October 31st in their Campbell’s...

Ringing of bells and gravesite flags to commemorate Armistice 100

OTTAWA, Oct. 24, 2018 /CNW/ - With five symbolic peals from the HMCS Carleton Naval B...

Bat cave a big hit at Kennebec Halloween party

“There aren’t as many children in the community as there were when we started this 16 ye...

Frontenac Farmers Market ends season on a chilly dark day

“Yes, surprisingly enough, we don’t plan to come out next week in the cold,” Front...

NORTH FRONTENAC NEWS

North Frontenac unravelling history — “one tombstone at a time”

North Frontenac unravelling history — “one tombstone at a time”

The Clar-Mill Community Archives’ latest project is cataloguing North Frontenac’s cemeteries and as such coordinator Brenda Martin was at North Frontenac’s regular Council meeting last Friday in Plevna to outline how they plan to go about it. “One of the ...

North Frontenac looking at $350,000 in building repairs

In North Frontenac, there are a few (public) buildings that don’t meet code, Brian MacDonald of McIntosh Perry, told Council at its regular meeting last week in Plevna. CAO Cheryl Robson said McIntosh Perry was contracted to do the Township’s first ever facilities assessment after a successful grant application for just this purpose. “I’ve been around eight years and this is the first time I’ve seen anything like this,” said Coun. Gerry Martin. MacDonald said they looked at 20 municipal facilities with an estimated total replacement value of about $10,000,000, including four fire halls and six public works facilities. While the ‘portfolio’ is currently in generally good condition, if no work were to be done on them in the next 10 years, the portfolio would be in generally “poor” condition, he said. “Approximately $2,171,000 would be required to maintain the facilities in a ‘state of good repair,’” he said. Of the 20 facilities, short term repairs and replacements of about $350,000 would be required on five of them. The Harlowe Community Hall needs $70,000 to repair basement leakage. The Snow Road Fire Hall needs $32,000 for staff washrooms. The Ompah Fish Hatchery needs $30,000 for general repairs. The Ward 1 Public Works Garage needs $40,000 cladding and water supply. The Cloyne Washroom and Change House needs $35,000 for roofing and mechanical work. Just about all of the facilities need some work, mostly related to accessibility. Council praised and accepted the report, but any decisions were relegated to 2019 budget deliberations. However, there were indications that some of the facilities might not survive the budgetary process. “The opportunity for the Fish Hatchery to come back into useful operation is nil to none,” said Dep. Mayor Fred Perry, who was chairing the meeting in the absence of Mayor Ron Higgins. The Cloyne washroom isn’t likely to get much love either. Even though one audience member pointed out that the ball diamond there is used for seniors slow-pitch, manager of community development Corey Klatt said: “This is my 11th year and it was out of service when I came.”   Councillors to be compensated for loss of tax exempt incomeCouncil accepted Treasurer Kelly Watkins’ report on the impact of losing the 1/3 tax-free status for municipal councilors remuneration but put off any decisions until the first meeting of the new Council on Dec. 5. Options range from doing nothing to a new pay structure for meeting attendance, mileage and per diem to outright compensation for the tax-free loss, which Watkins estimated would cost the Township about $17,000. Coun. Vern Hermer was in favour of some sort of compensation. “I don’t think it’s fair that we should take a hit because the federal of provincial governments want a bit more in their coffers,” Hermer said. However, Coun. John Inglis seemed OK with the potential loss in salary. “We’re above the median (in pay) and we’re above Central Frontenac,” Inglis said. “I feel we’re well compensated. “Leave the status quo; for our population, we have a very large staff.” “We won’t attract many young Council members with this pay,” said Coun. Gerry Martin. “Whether John (Inglis) thinks he’s overpaid — which he probably is.” Watkins’ said “across the province, the majority of municipalities are compensating councilors for the 1/3 loss.” Palmerston BeachWhile the Mississippi Valley Conservation Authority is open to sell the Palmerston Beach property to North Frontenac Township (MVCA passed a resolution Aug. 3 granting an “option to purchase for a nominal sum”), just what the Township plans to do regarding the property is undecided. “We did sell property on Malcolm Lake years back that went to a developer,” said Coun. Gerry Martin. “That’s the reason for the buy-back clause.” “I don’t agree that $128,000 should be spent to create a park that would only be used by a few people,” said Coun. Wayne Good.   Good burlap after bad?Coun. Gerry Martin reported that $1,500 worth of burlap has been put down in Ardoch Lake in an effort to combat Eurasian Milfoil. However, Martin was less than enthusiastic about the chances for success in the project. “We have it in so many of our lakes, I think it’s a lost cause,” he said.   NAEC visitWhile applauding the North Addington Education Centre’s interest in municipal government, North Frontenac Council won’t be showing up to an assembly in any kind of numbers, on the advice of Clerk Tara Mieske. “I would recommend only three or fewer go so that no business of Council will be advanced,” she said. Coun. John Inglis volunteered to attend.

Former Ompah Schoolhouse destroyed by fire

On Sunday evening (Sept. 30) a fire swept through a residential building that at one time was the schoolhouse for the Village of Ompah. The building had been converted into a single family dwelling in the years following the school’s close in the late 1960’s or early 1970’s. It was occupied by a family of 4 until this week. The family is reportedly living in Perth and a number of local people are attempting to reach out to support them. “The good news was that no one was injured in the fire. I believe the family pets made it out unscathed as well,” said North Frontenac Fire Chief Eric Korhonen. Korhonen said that North Frontenac Firefighters and the Kaladar Barrie department responded to the fire. By the time they arrived, the building was beyond saving and the efforts were focussed on preventing the fire from spreading and making sure it was completely out. The department still needs to complete an investigation, but Korhonen said it looks like the fire will be classed as “cause undetermined” because the building had burned completely and all evidence about what may have caused it has been destroyed The Ompah Schoolhouse was built around 1870, roughly at the same time as the Anglican Church in Ompah. It closed about 100 years later, when Clarendon Central Public School opened in Plevna. Barbara Sproule was the teacher in the one room school between 1958 and the school’s closing. She remembers that the building was rather basic; the school was heated by a wood stove, and did not have running water, although it did have a well and hand pump. “We had a caretaker who came in early to start up the stove, but there were winter days when we started the day with the children sitting around the woodstove until the building warmed up.” She said, “but we made do and everyone co-operated. Those were good years. Sproule was only 16 when she started teaching at the Canonto school, and 17 when she started teaching in Ompah, not much older than some of her students. “I never told them my age, but I think they knew,” she said. Not only did she teach in the Ompah school, Sproule also attended the school, as did both her mother and her son. When the school closed it was purchased by members of the Thomas family as a cottage, and it was later renovated into a family home. The current owners have lived there for several years.

NF rejects boat wash proposal

While Council did approve $1,500 to help the Malcolm and Ardoch Lakes Association get started with its battle against Eurasian milfoil and seems amenable to a further $10,000 to hire a grad student for the project at some time in the future, one of the potential weapons for the battle didn’t get approved. Council decided that boat wash stations represented more potential issues than they might solve, not the least of which is cost. “Didn’t we already decide this (boat wash stations) is too expensive?” said Coun. John Ingles at Friday’s meeting. “To me, it would be too expensive,” said Mayor Ron Higgins. “And how would you police it? “Would we have to have an attendant?” “The concern was that it would become a car wash,” said community development manager Corey Klatt. “I don’t think it would be as easy as putting up a building and having a pressure washer in there.” Higgins suggested they would approve the province for assistance. Coun. Wayne Good didn’t see much point in that. “From what I’ve seen in presentations, there’s absolutely no way you can stop it,” Good said. “It’s in about 10 areas of the (Ardoch) lake and in other lakes as well,” said Higgins. Property standards bylaw doesn't fly in North FrontenacIt doesn’t look like there will be anything resembling a property standards bylaw in North Frontenac in the near future following last Friday’s regular Council meeting in Plevna. Keeping in mind that Council will be the same with the exception of Fred Fowler replacing Denis Bedard for the next four years, it is unlikely Council would entertain something it appears to be against. Mayor Ron Higgins served a notice of motion at the previous Council meeting to discuss the issue after the Township received a complaint from a resident that a neighbouring property was in disrepair. “I’d like to see us come up with a bylaw to deal with properties in disrepair,” Higgins said. “Neighbours are concerned about property values.” “Tough titty,” said Coun. John Inglis. “In most cases, people knew about the neighbouring properties before they moved in. “In this case, it’s not dangerous, there aren’t health issues, the opposition is purely esthetic. “Generally, with these complaints, it’s about low income people who can’t afford to make esthetic repairs although sometimes it’s a personal choice. “It’s all part of the process of living with people who don’t have the same means as you do.” “I’m against too much Big Brother being involved,” said Coun. Wayne Good. “What are you going to do — tell them they have to go into debt? “We already have a safe properties bylaw.” Some councilors noted how divisive an attempt to institute a property standards bylaw in Central Frontenac was. “Some municipalities have a property standards bylaw but we don’t have the staff to administer one,” said CAO Cheryl Robson. “And you would have to set up an appeals body. “You’d have to involve the fire chief, the bylaw officer and the chief building official.” “Some guy builds a million dollar house next to a shack,” said Good. Council instructed staff to look at a policy of sending a letter to ‘offending’ homeowners. “I would just caution about a ‘letter from the Township,’” said Inglis. “That can be pretty scary stuff.”   Lamenting the loss of Firefighter AssociationsCouncil approved the Clarendon-Miller Volunteer Firefighters Association’s plan to purchase chairs for the training room at the Clarendon-Miller Station and thanked them for the donation. Coun. John Inglis noted that as of right now, the Clarendon-Miller association is the only one in the Township except for the ladies auxiliary in Snow Road. Inglis asked fire chief Eric Korhonen if he saw a need for more firefighter associations. “That is entirely up to the firefighters,” Korhonen said.

North Frontenac Back Roads Studio Tour

The end of September, one of the loveliest times in the Northern Part of Frontenac County, brings with it the North Frontenac Back Roads Studio Tour. As with many such successful tours, the participating artists are a loyal crowd and most of them can be visited again this year. Since artists are always changing what they do and getting better at it, it is interesting to see how they have progressed and what is on their creative minds at present. As always there will be a few new artists joining the event. New visitors and old will enjoy the chance to explore this unique part of the province and find the many studios tucked away in its corners. And while it has proved impossible to predict what each Autumn will be like when it comes to fall colours, the last weekend in September has the best chance of providing the peak of the annual Fall Colour Extravaganza. Set off against the hills and many lakes of North Frontenac Township, the trip is worthwhile for that aspect alone. The tour covers a wide geographic area centred around the villages of Myers Cave, Fernleigh, Ardoch, Plevna, Ompah and Snow Road. It would be hard to do the whole tour in one day, and give the studios you are interested in the time and attention you would like. Non local visitors are encouraged to stay overnight at one of the accommodations recommended in the brochure, and to snack or have a meal at one of the establishments on the tour or in the brochure. Washrooms which are available thoughout the area are also indicated. For those who have not picked up a Tour Brochure already, a printable brochure can be downloaded from the website NorthFrontenacBackRoadsStudioTour.com. This, and the website itself, provide the information you need to have a fabulous weekend on September 29th and 30th.

CENTRAL FRONTENAC NEWS

Educators play role in managing Diabetes

Educators play role in managing Diabetes

November is Diabetes Awareness Month and November 14 is World Diabetes Day. To raise awareness of diabetes and to provide information on best management, the Sharbot Family Health Team Diabetes Education Team (Cathy Fox, Certified Diabetes Educator, Registered Nurse and Saman Sha...

HPV oral cancers – let’s talk about it

As a clinical Restorative Dental Hygienist for many years, I have performed countless oral cancer screening exams and have had to have difficult conversations with many clients regarding sexually transmitted diseases. When I first graduated, oral cancer was traditionally found in the middle aged population with a history of smoking and alcohol abuse. Unfortunately today the risk factors and demographics have changed. The human papilloma virus (HPV) is now considered the epidemic of oral cancers especially among men. The virus is now found in 70% of cancers and much more difficult to detect. There is no cure for HPV related cancers. HPV is the most common STD virus and infection. It is the leading cause of oropharyngeal cancers primarily at the base of the tongue, tonsils, crypts and throat. There are nearly 200 strains of the virus but we are most concerned about HPV16 in oral, cervical, anal and penile cancers. Most sexually active individuals have been exposed to HPV and we could be carrying the virus without knowing for many years or decades before our body does one of two things: fosters the infection OR our immune system clears the virus. Most of us with a strong immune system will usually clear the virus within two years. Risk factors for becoming infected are the number of sexual partners you have had or the number your partner has had, and a weakened immune system. It is transmitted from skin to skin genital contact (intercourse and oral sex). Condoms reduce the incidence of contraction as well as HPV vaccinations. Gardasil and Cervarix vaccines protect against HPV16 and millions of females starting at the age of nine have been safely vaccinated at no cost to them through our school boards. The vaccination needs to be administered at the PRE sexual age as it will not work if you have already been exposed to the virus. What about the male population?? Males are four times more likely to contract HPV and Ontario does NOT currently have a no-cost school based HPV vaccination for nontrans males. It is likely to change in the future but currently most males are NOT protected unless they seek vaccination through a private clinic at cost of approximately $540.00 for the three necessary doses. Some private insurances will cover the cost and I encourage all parents of young boys/men to invest in the vaccination. It could save their life. DETECTION - Dentistry has a huge role to play in detection and education of these HPV related cancers. Dental exams when done thoroughly and properly saves lives! Ensure your dental professional is performing oral cancer screenings for you, your kids and grandkids. I am a huge proponent in education and not only should the screenings be done at every dental visit but young males who are around the age to becoming sexually active, should be informed of the higher risks associated to them due to lack of the vaccination and protection available to lower the incidence of this deadly disease. WHAT CAN YOU DO? - It is important that you also perform your own oral cancer screening and there is a widely publicized “Seven Step DIY Oral Cancer Screening” that you can do that could save your life. Any sore/lesion, discoloration, irritation, hoarseness, induration or prominent tissue which does not resolve in two weeks should be checked by an oral health professional. THE SEVEN STEP DIY ORAL CANCER SCREENING: Compete while facing a mirror with adequate lighting. Step 1: Tongue – Stick your tongue out and hold the end with a cloth to give you some grip. Move your tongue to the right and left and look for any red and white patches. Do the same for the top and bottom of the tongue. Use your index finger to feel for any unusual lumps on the sides, top and bottom of the tongue Step 2: Lip and cheek – Look around the edge of your lips for any lesions or sores. Using the thumb and index finger of both hands, pull back your upper and lower lips and look for red or white lesions/sores. Using these same fingers, feel for any lumps or bumps. Next, use your thumb and index finger to pull back the right side of your cheek looking for any red or white patches. Rub your cheek to feel for any lumps or bumps. Repeat on the left side. Step 3: Floor of Mouth – Raise tongue to the roof of your mouth and look under where it rests on the bottom of your mouth for any white or red patches. Using one finger inside the floor of the mouth and another on the opposing surface from the outside (under your chin) feel for any lumps/bumps between your fingers. Step 4: Roof of Mouth – Look at the roof of your mouth for any unusual sores or red and white patches. Rub the roof of your mouth and feel for new or unusual swelling. Step 5: Head and Neck – Using all four fingers to rub in a circular motion, feel your neck for unusual lumps/bumps or tender areas. Repeat this on the back of your neck along your hairline and behind, under and in front of your ears. Step 6: Say “ahhhh….” Press down on your tongue with a tongue depressor or teaspoon , say “ahhhh..” and examine the back of your throat looking for red/white patches or unusual bumps. Step 7: Tell someone – Call your oral health professional and have any unusual findings checked – early detection is key!! We can all be proponents for change for our at-risk youth. Let’s get talking about HPV … to one another, our kids, our insurance carriers and government officials for changes to Ontario’s policy to vaccinate our young men and save lives! Cathy Byrnes is the recently retired as the restorative dental hygienist at the Sharbot Lake Dental Clinic.

Bat cave a big hit at Kennebec Halloween party

“There aren’t as many children in the community as there were when we started this 16 years ago, but we do have more grandparents coming out and they seem to be enjoying themselves,” said Wanda Harrison, chief organizer of Kennebec Rec’s annual kids Halloween party. “Actually, we do have a couple of new families this year and even one baby lumberjack.” Many things are still the same as they have been many years. For instance, Barbara Kirkland is still the “tattoo expert” and Diane Nicholson organizes the costume parade. Kent Smith and Lorne Hiltz were in the kitchen cooking hot dogs. But one thing that changes every year is what goes on in the basement. This year, it was a bat cave. “This is our fourth year,” said Connie Tryan, who manages to transform the lower level of Kennebec Hall with her husband Boyd (“I just do what she tells me, even at home.”) “We’ve done pirates, witches, and a haunted house. “This year, we were studying stalactites at kids club and decided on a bat cave after feedback from the kids, some of whom have been down here two or three times now.”

Council approves commission of fire station location study, and beginning of fire master plan

Central Frontenac Council approved a recommendation by Manager of Emergency Services/Fire Chief Greg Robinson to amend the Fire Bylaw as recommended in the Fire & Rescue Phase Two Operational and Organizational Review at its regular meeting evening in Sharbot Lake. Specifically, Robinson asked Council to have a fire station location study done; develop a master plan for Council’s approval; include gaps/risks identified in the phase two operational and organizational review that have not been mitigated to be addressed in that master plan; fully support the implementation of changes resulting from the operational and organizational review; and keep Council informed on the implementation of changes resulting from the phase two operational and organizational review. Robinson said that there was $25,000 in the budget to be used for the station location study and master plan. Coun. John Purdon said that the master plan should also have prevention and protection in addition to the word fire in the title. But Purdon also questioned the need for a fire station location study. “We have three fairly new stations and I can’t see wanting to relocate those,” Purdon said. “How big a study do we need for our four stations and two substations?” “We did our own study and there was a possibility to combine Arden and Mountain Grove,” Robinson said. “But we don’t have the data we need.” Coun. Brent Cameron went even further, questioning the scope of the phase two operational and organizational review, a rather large document presented to Council at the May 22 regular Council meeting that contained 142 “gaps” the fire chief said needed addressing. “I’m not trying to be difficult,” Cameron said. “But the province has rescinded some of the requirements, gaps, that study identified. “I feel like we’ve been given a large number of recommendations (142) and been told to take it or leave it. “I’m not comfortable with this and would like to see a less ambitious document — one that gives the retention of personnel higher priority.” Robinson responded that the master plan isn’t yet completed and “only five recommendations are being asked for tonight.” While that might be technically true, one of the recommendations is that Council give its full support to the “implementation of required changes resulting from the phase two operational and organizational review.” Another recommendation is those changes be included in the fire master plan. Dep. Mayor Tom Dewey suggested they wait to pass the resolution until the new Council but Mayor Frances Smith said she was fine with the resolution as is. “There are seven of us who have been through it,” she said. Winter Maintenance contracts Council approved acting Public Works Manager Dave Armstrong’s recommendation that they accept contractors’ bids for winter road maintenance in Area 1 and Area 2 and do the snow removal, sanding/salting in house for Area 3 and Area 4. Armstrong said in his report that based on historical invoices for 2016-2017 and 2017-2018 winter seasons, the Township would be spending about $287,500 annually for Areas 1 and 2 to be serviced leaving a surplus of about $137,500 from the budgeted amount for equipment rental, additional equipment maintenance and repair, and future considerations for equipment purchasing and/or rental. Essentially, the Township will be paying $2,723.22 for each snow/sleet/freezing rain event in Area 1 and $1,751.59 in Area 2. He said he hasn’t had enough experience yet to estimate what it will cost the Township to do Areas 3 and 4 itself. Henderson Road Culvert Council awarded the Henderson Road Culvert tender to Crains’ Construction Ltd. for $191,110 not including HST. The budget for the job was $200,000. Acting Public Works Manager David Armstrong said he’d work with the contractor to get the work done as soon as possible and minimize traffic disruption. He estimated there would be “about four days” of traffic disruption as it is a rather large culvert.

Diabetes awareness month

November is Diabetes Awareness Month and November 14 is World Diabetes Day. To raise awareness of diabetes and share information on best management, the Sharbot Family Health Team Diabetic Education Team (Cathy Fox, Certified Diabetes Educator, Registered Nurse and Saman Shaikh, Certified Diabetes Educator, Registered Dietitian) will be contributing weekly articles during the month of November Currently diabetes is reaching epidemic proportions as one in three Canadians is living with diabetes or prediabetes and an estimated 1.5 million are living with undiagnosed diabetes. There isn’t a cure yet for diabetes but maintaining a healthy lifestyle can reduce its impact on your life. What you do every day makes a difference: eating healthily, staying physically active, taking medicines if prescribed, and keeping health care appointments to stay on track. There are three main types of diabetes: type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes (diabetes while pregnant). With type 1 diabetes, your body can’t make insulin (a hormone that acts like a key to let blood sugar into cells for use as energy), so you need to take it every day. Type 1 diabetes is less common than type 2 diabetes; 5% of the people who have diabetes have type 1. Currently, no one knows how to prevent type 1 diabetes. Most people with diabetes—9 out of 10—have type 2 diabetes. With type 2 diabetes, your body doesn’t use insulin well and is unable to keep blood sugar at normal levels. If you have any of the risk factors below, ask your doctor if you should be tested for diabetes. The sooner you find out, the sooner you can start making healthy changes that will benefit you now and in the future. Type 2 diabetes risk factors include: Having prediabetes (blood sugar levels that are higher than normal but not high enough to be diagnosed as diabetes). Being overweight. Being 45 years or older. Having a parent, brother, or sister with type 2 diabetes. Being physically active less than 3 times a week. Ever having gestational diabetes or giving birth to a baby who weighed more than 9 pounds.   The Canadian Diabetic Association encourages everyone to visit www. Diabetestest.ca to take the online CANRISK test and learn their risk level for developing type 2 diabetes.     You’ve been diagnosed with diabetes or prediabetes. Now what? Managing diabetes or prediabetes is a balancing act—food, activity, medicine, and blood sugar levels—but you can do it. Meeting with a certified diabetes educator is a great way to get support and guidance, including how to: Follow a healthy eating plan. Get physically active. Test your blood sugar. Give yourself insulin by syringe, pen, or pump, if needed. Monitor your feet, skin and eyes to catch problems early. Get diabetes supplies and store them according to package directions. Manage stress and deal with daily diabetes care.   What is a Certified Diabetes Educator?   Certified Diabetes Educators play a significant role in managing Diabetes. A Certified Diabetes Educator (CDE) is a licensed health care professional, such as a nurse, dietitian or pharmacist, who specializes in helping people with diabetes learn how to manage their condition. The counselling and support that CDEs provide is known as diabetes education or diabetes self-management. To certify, the diabetes educator must pass a national exam that certifies them with the Canadian Diabetes Educator Certification Board. Re-certification is done every 5 years to maintain the status of “Certified” Diabetes Educator (CDE). CDEs assist people with diabetes or prediabetes with self-management by offering evidence-based guidance to diabetes care. CDEs collaborate with the physician or nurse practitioner using the 2018 Diabetes Canada Guidelines to follow you in such areas as monitoring of blood glucose, medications, reducing risk of complications, monitoring of blood pressure, weight, waist circumference, feet, eyes and exercise. In your diabetes visit, the CDE will discuss your needs and goals, provide tracking tools to help you monitor your diabetes and answer any questions you may have. Ask your health care provider about diabetes self-management education and support and to recommend a diabetes educator. The Sharbot Lake Family Health Team has a Diabetic Team that includes 2 Certified Diabetes Educators (CDEs) who work closely with the rest of the Sharbot Lake Family Health Team health care providers to help you achieve the best health possible. Please call the clinic at 613-279-2100 for more information.

SOUTH FRONTENAC NEWS

Hanging up his cleaver

Hanging up his cleaver

After 30 years in the meat department at the Trousdale’s Foodland store in Sydenham, Laurie Ross is hanging up his meat cleaver on November 18th. Laurie had not intended to retire any time soon. “I had figured I would be working at least another dozen or so years,&r...

Chronic diseases steal function, not dignity, of local man fighting for his life

Gary Paquin felt alive when he held a set of drumsticks. Feeling the music pulse through his body, he played the drums with passion and pleasure. Like his father and brother, music was a large part of his life; tap a beat for the musicians around him and give the crowd a great show. He played for years, travelling from coast-to-coast with several recording artists in Canada. But that all changed when a tick hiding in the fur of his cat returned home and infected him with Lyme Disease. Gary was in his early-50s when his illness stole his ability to play the drums. Now, at 57 years old, he’s fighting for his life. Wearing a leather jacket in late October, Gary talks about the challenges he has endured. He isn’t looking for pity, but he would appreciate help to finance a potentially life-saving medical treatment he wants more than anything, including the ability to play his drums again. “The hardest part of this disease is getting help,” says Gary who lives in South Frontenac Township. Struggling to diagnose the condition that was stealing Gary’s motor function, doctors prescribed a variety of medication that were ineffective. Finally, after 1.5 years of suffering, Gary spent $600 on a test in the United States to confirm Lyme Disease. “There is a real problem within Canada,” he says thoughtfully. “Many doctors do not have a solid understanding of the disease and the doctors who do can lose their license for treating chronic Lyme, along with Ontario's flawed testing.” With precious time lost, Gary returned to Canada to treat the disease that was creating havoc in a body already compromised by Type 1 Diabetes. Dependent on insulin since he was nine years old, Gary’s immune system was powerless to fight the bacteria invading his cells. “It’s a little bit complicated,” he says with a small smile when asked about his management and control of diabetes. “With the other conditions, I have a pretty good hold on that.” What he hasn’t got a hold on is the Parkinson’s Disease that set-in two years ago from the long-term effects of chronic Lyme which damaged him neurologically. “My motor skills are severely impaired. The chronic fatigue is incredible,” he says about the degenerative disorder of the central nervous system that mainly affects the motor system. Already showing signs of shaking, rigidity, slowness of movement and difficulty walking, Gary knows the disease is progressive and relentless. To stay alive, he has spent his savings and sold almost everything he owns, including his drum kit and acoustic guitar from his late father, to pay $500 a month for medications and visits to a naturopath. “Alternative therapies have helped,” Gary attests. “In the end, you do what you can afford and hope it’s enough. “Saying that, there is a huge urgency to get the funds for treatment as I fight to maintain my independence and dignity as the diseases take more of my life day-after-day. Time is not on my side.” Looking tired as the night closes in, Gary admits, “Sickness has taken away most of the things I love. My drumming career has been completely squashed. I can’t function normally. When I couldn’t play the drums, I lost my heart.” “I can’t button-up shirts or tie my own shoes,” he continues. “I try to stay positive because stress makes it worse. It’s hard not to be pissed-off, it’s an outrage. But I don’t feel sorry for myself. It’s anger more than anything and some acceptance because you have to accept what you can’t change.” He notes solemnly, “I’m grateful just to be alive. I just buried a good friend last weekend who was only 52. It makes me grateful for the things I can still do such as the ability to feed and wash myself. “My blessings are many,” he says, referencing the functions he still has and the friends, family and church who are rallying to support him through a fundraiser at Zorbas Banquet Hall on Nov. 18. The fundraiser is to help offset the cost of stem cell transplant for Gary. “It was a quite a process just to qualify for the treatment because you have to be the ideal candidate,” he explains. “They plan to harvest the stem cells from my own body. It’s regenerative medicine. The stem cell network will be working closely with me for at least two years to help me and gather research for future patients who might benefit from this treatment. They’re also trying to find better ways to improve and help other people who are suffering from a debilitating disease.” Working to raise $10,000 to cover expenses not funded by OHIP, Gary’s voice sounds hopeful about his upcoming treatment which boasts a 63 per cent success rate with Parkinson’s symptoms. Calling it the new face of modern medicine, Gary says stem cell transplant should help with his Lyme Disease and some of the damage caused by years of diabetes. He hopes it will help him sleep better and reduce his chronic pain. “People in worse shape than I am have been helped,” he says with confidence. “I’ve been beaten-up pretty bad over the years,” he acknowledges softly. “But I keep coming back kicking. It’s hard to keep a good man down.” Smiling at his joke, Gary is quick to thank the people who plan to support his fundraiser in November and who have donated to his Go Fund Me page. “Some people who have contributed to the cause are in worse shape than I am,” he says kindly. “I’m very grateful for the friends and fellow musicians who are helping me with this whole process. I have an attitude of gratitude.” Storrington Lions Club recently donated $250 to help Gary Paquin. To reach him directly, call 613-449-2611 or write This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Gary’s fundraiser at Zorba’s on Nov. 18 is from noon to 8 pm. It is open to everyone.  

Verona shop window a tribute to local WW I battalion

Back when Verona had a Royal Canadian Legion Branch, new member Doug Lovegrove was a little concerned that there wasn’t much commemorating the First World War and in particular the 146th Overseas Battalion, which was a unit in the Canadian Expeditionary Force from Dec. 22, 1915 to July 17, 1917. The 146th, you see, was formed from recruits in Frontenac, Lennox & Addington Counties. So Lovegrove set about finding out everything he could about the unit (the results of his search are online at 146battlion.ca). Being that this year is the 100th anniversary of the guns falling silent on Nov. 11, 1918, Lovegrove put together a special display in the storefront window of Nicole’s Gifts in Verona. Owner Nicole Van Camp’s daughter and son-in-law are officers in the Royal Canadian Air Force. “This display is a conglomerate of my own collection and museum stuff,” Lovegrove said. “For example, the big picture of the unit (91 inches wide) is on permanent loan to our museum from the museum in Bath. “When I went down to see them, they said they didn’t know if they had anything on the 146th, but they had a picture upstairs and this was it.” On Sept. 27, 1916, the 146th, aboard Her Majesty’s Transport (HMT) Southland left Halifax for England along with HMT Corsican, HMT Tuscania, HMT Lapland, HMT Laconia and cruiser HMS Roxburgh as well as two patrol boats and a trawler or a mine sweeper. They arrived in England on Oct. 6, 1916, with 26 officers and 581 other ranks. But, as Lovegrove said, “Their sole purpose was to replenish the front lines,” and as such, the unit was disbanded on Oct. 8, 1916 with a last parade and the officers and men were absorbed into other units. Most were sent to fight in France. Lovegrove said he has documented 487 members of the 146th and suspects there were about 900 who were a part of the unit since its beginnings Nov. 28, 1915. “On Nov. 11 this year, the community electronic bulletin board (in Verona) will display the names of the men we know and their flags,” Lovegrove said. But there’s another aspect of military contribution that Lovegrove’s display also features — the contributions women made. “In the First World War alone, there were about 3,000 nurses that joined the military,” he said. “And then there were Red Cross and Salvation Army nurses, about 4,500 total.” The official total was 4,518 nursing sisters, of whom 92 died. There were also home nurses, many of whom served at the Sydenham Military Hospital during WWI. The hospital is now the site of the Isabel Bader Centre for the Performing Arts. In the Second World War, there were 7,000 WRCNS in 39 trades, 20,545 CWACs in 55 trades, 17,038 WDs in 65 trades, 4,480 nursing sisters, 640 Red Cross personnel and 260 St. John’s Ambulance personnel. Seventy-three died and 19 were wounded. There were 16 nursing sisters in the Korean War and 237 Canadian Forces personnel in the 1991 Gulf War. From 1986 to 2000, 2,573 women served in Canadian military peace keeping operations. At the age of 72, Lovegrove said, “I was too young to have served in the wars as I was born just after the Second World War was over.” But, he served in the military from 1967 to 1991 with NATO forces in Germany and with the United Nations in the Golan Heights and Cyprus. And he wears the Poppy proudly. “Since 1921, the Poppy has stood as a symbol of Remembrance, our visual pledge to never forget all those Canadian who have fallen in war and military operations,” he said. “The Canadians who died believed in a better future. “We have inherited that future in a rich and beautiful country and it’s up to us to continue to work for that better future. “If we do, we will have remembered and they will know that their their faith in the future wasn’t misplaced.”       Doug Lovegrove stands in front of the Remembrance display in the window of Nicole’s Gifts in Verona. “Nicky’s been very supportive,” he said. Photo/Craig Bakay

Trinity United Church craft/bake sale has become a tradition in Verona

Trinity United Church in Verona has been holding a craft/bake sale on the first Saturday in November for a long time now. Nobody’s really too sure how long but it’s at least 25 years, dating back to when it was held in the bookstore at the mall in Verona. Organizer Jane Adamson has been involved in most of them, although she readily admits “I have help, for instance Joyce Casement was the fundraiser.” Although Adamson moved to Kingston recently, she’s still involved with the museum in Hartington and still spends “about three days a week in Verona” with various activities and groups. “We have 17 vendors this year, two of whom are new,” Adamson said. “It’s been steady (customers) considering the weather. “We try to decorate for Christmas to get people in the mood.” Although the event is a fundraiser for the Church, they are also continuing the Christmas basket tradition (all the goods in the baskets are donated, including gift certificates from Tim Horton’s, Canadian Tire and Carmelinda’s Restaurant in Kingston) which raises funds for the community. “Last year we raised $860 that went to Christmas for Kids,” she said. It’s a very social atmosphere at the sale, with lunch available and that’s a big part of what keeps Adamson and others coming back to do it. “I just enjoy the day,” she said. “People come and I love seeing new people, but I also love people coming back.” Adamson said it’s important to keep up traditions such as this. “We need to keep it up,” she said. “As Joyce said to me, ‘people look forward to it.’”                   The sign says ‘just chillin’ and that’s what therapy dog Buddy was doing with his crafting companion Tony Farrell of Tony Farrell Woodcrafts. Photo/Craig Bakay

South Frontenac Council holds final meeting of term and McDougall reflects

FarewellsPresent and future Mayor Ron Vandewal made presentations to the three departing Council members at this last meeting of the current Council: Brad Barbeau, Marc Schjerning and John McDougall. Barbeau had come on board for the final year and a half, replacing the late Bill Robinson; Schjerning has served a full term, and McDougall is retiring after two terms on Council. All three had contributed to a wide range of Township committees and community groups. Reflecting on his past eight years, McDougall said, “When I started, I thought I had all the answers, but I quickly came to appreciate just how complicated (local government) really is, involving not only the Township, but the County, Eastern Ontario and the Province.” He spoke warmly of the leadership of both the Mayors, Gary Davison and Ron Vandewal, with whom he had worked. “I had not originally understood that Council has only one employee it can direct, and that is the CAO.” In reference to his longstanding goal of developing more affordable housing in South Frontenac for seniors, McDougall warned, “Seniors’ housing is not dead; I’ll be watching you!” Planning MattersClaire Dodds, the recently-appointed Director of Development Services brought forward five proposed zoning by-law amendments for comments at a public meeting. Four dealt with waterfront properties, either lot additions or lot creations on Sydenham, Bob’s and Green Lakes. The fifth related to a zoning change to permit a craft brewery on a property near Petworth. There were no comments from the public on any of these, which will come to the Dec 4th Council meeting as by-laws for approval. Public Works Road BudgetTaxpayers have expressed dismay over the budget overruns on several road projects: the Harrowsmith Intersection, Bedford Road and Rutledge/Harrowsmith repaving. ($100,000 of the overages was created by an unanticipated increase MTO Asphalt Indexing.) In his roads department revised budget report, Public Works Director Segsworth showed that the year’s total roads construction costs had been brought into line with the amount originally budgeted for 2018: some projects, notably Petworth Culvert, Amy Road, Desert Lake Causeway and Sydenham Dam have been postponed, and an Ont. Municipal Commuter Cycling Grant of $80,882 helped offset costs of the Harrowsmith/Rutledge Road project. Ontario East Regional Agility CompetitionCouncil agreed to both noise and camping exemptions for a group wishing to use Harrowsmith’s Centennial Park for their annual competitions on the weekend of May 30-June 2. McDougall said that they have used the park for the past two years, and have been model guests. (One may assume that the individuals whose agility is being tested at this event are probably dogs, though this was never specified…) Steady as she goes in building reportAs of the end of September, the township was at almost exactly the same pace as it was last year in terms of total construction value and the number of permits issued. For the first 9 months of of 2018, 239 permits for $26.22 million in construction value have been issued. At the same point in 2017, 235 permits for $26.31 in construction value had been issued. This puts the township in line for its second consecutive year with over $30 million in construction value. The pace of new home building is a bit down however. With 52 permits for single family dwellings, the township needs a slight 4th quarter uptick to reach the total of 70 that was accomplished in both 2017 and 2016.

FRONTENAC COUNTY NEWS

Ruttan returns, but change may be afoot at Limestone

Ruttan returns, but change may be afoot at Limestone

The Frontenac County trustees are set to become part of the old guard on the board of trustees for the Limestone District School Board come December 12th. Suzanne Ruttan easily held off the challenge from Roger Curtis, receiving 3659 votes to 1672 for Curtis, to return to the bo...

Mayors all return, but half of county council will be new

Three of the four Frontenac County Mayors were acclaimed back into office for a new term (Dennis Doyle – Frontenac Islands – 3rd term, Frances Smith, Central Frontenac – 2nd term, and Ron Higgins – North Frontenac – 2nd term) and the fourth, South Frontenac’s Ron Vandewal won re-election for a second term. They will form the bedrock of the council, but in all likelihood they will be joined by four new members. Natalie Nossal, the 2nd Frontenac Islands rep on the council, did not seek re-election. She will most likely be replaced on county council by Bruce Higgs. Higgs received the most votes in ward 1 (Howe Island) this time around. In Frontenac Islands, the top vote getting councillor from the ward where the mayor does not reside is offered the 2nd county position. Since Dennis Doyle is from Wolfe Islands, it is Higgs position if he wants it. After the 2014 election, newcomer Nossal finished first ahead of David Jones, who had been at the county table for four years. Jones promptly resigned from Frontenac Island Council and rode into the political sunset. Bruce Higgs was appointed to Frontenac Islands Council to take his place. In South Frontenac John McDougall did not seek re-election. Tom Dewey was re-elected in Central Frontenac but he told the News he will not be seeking the second Central Frontenac position when the matter comes to the new Central Frontenac Council in early December. In North Frontenac John Inglis has also indicated he is unlikely to be seeking the county role again after spending 8 years on Frontenac County Council. In terms of gender balance, there will be 7 women among the 30 members of Council (23%) in the 4 Frontenac Townships. Two of the four are approaching gender parity, Frontenac Islands (2 of 5 – 40%) and Central Frontenac (4 of 9 – 44%), while South Frontenac (1 of 9 -11%) and North Frontenac (0 of 7) drag the overall percentage down. The 7 women are an increase over the 2014-2018 councils, however. There are only 6 women (20%) of the 30 council members in Frontenac County during the current four-year term. While the political side of the council tables remains predominantly male, on the administrative side the situation is different. 3 of the 5 Chief Administrators in Frontenac County are women, and 3 of the 4 Treasurers (Frontenac Islands contracts out its financial services to Frontenac County) are women as well. In terms of age, people in their 60’s and 70’s predominate on most councils. In Central Frontenac, however, there are at least four members of council who are not of retirement age, which is an exception when you look county wide. It is more than likely, however, that once the makeup of Frontenac County Council is determined, that it will be entirely made up from the over 60 crowd. This is partly due to the overall demographics of the local councils, but also because it is very difficult for a full time worker to manage both township and county responsibilities.

Municipal Elections Results South and Central Frontenac, Addington Highlands and Tay Valley

Voting is now complete and the results are in for South and Central Frontenac, Addington Highlands and Tay Valley See below South Frontenac Mayor Ron Vandewal -- 3237 Mark Schjerning - 2164 Phil Archambault 1274 Portland District Doug Morey - 579 Brad Barbeau - 495 Bruno Albano - 222 Tom Bruce - 528 Ray Leonard - 1156 Loughborough District Fran Willes - 1,075 Ross Sutherland -1,647 Farrah Soaft - 275 Randy Ruttan - 1,075 Limestone DSB Suzanne Ruttan - 3,659 Roger Curtis - 1672 Central Frontenac  Hinchinbrooke Nicki Gowdy - 362 Philip Smith - 315 Brent Cameron 328 Olden Victor Heese 267 Dan Cunningham 175 Bill Everett 171 Elwyn Burke 190 Kennebec Tom Dewey 410 Cindy Kelsey 404 Isaac Hale 289 Addington Highlands Reeve Henry Hogg - 769 Alice Madigan - 653 Ward 1 Royce Rosemnblath - 343 Tony Fritsch - 531 Kirby Thompson - 378 Ward 2 Helen Yanch - 405 Bill Cox - 388 David Myles - 450 Tay Valley Reeve Brian Campbell 1581 Susan Freeman 1234 Kieth Kerr 597 Deputy Reeve Barrie Crampton 2021 Judy Farrell 1344 Sherbrooke Ward Mark Burnham 327 RoxAnne Darling - 483 Rob Rainer - 455 Lanark Highlands Mayor Peter Mclaren - 1472 Terry Lee Donaldson - 1067 Brian Stewart - 406 Deputy Mayor John Wilson Hall - 1008 Bob Mingie - 954 Bill Nelson - 962 Ward 5 (Elphin McDonalds Corners) Jeannie Kelso - 242 Mary Kirkham - 178  

Eligible voters is not the number of permanent residents in a township

We know you’re probably all wondering just how many eligible voters there are in Frontenac County municipal elections this year. One quirk of living in cottage country is that often there are a lot more eligible voters than there are permanent residents and Frontenac County is no exception to this rule. For example, in North Frontenac Township, the population according to the 2016 census is 1,898. However, because there are an awful lot of seasonal residents, there are actually 5,984 eligible voters. This twist here is that all of the Council positions and all but one school board position were filled by acclamation. So, no matter how many eligible voters there are, unless you’re an Algonquin & Lakeshore Catholic District School Board or a French Language Separate board supporter, you have nothing to vote on. The concept of more voters than population holds true for Frontenac Islands and Central Frontenac townships as well. On the Islands, there is a population of 1,760 people and 2,201 eligible voters. In Central Frontenac, there are twice as many eligible voters as there are residents. The Central Frontenac 2016 census showed a population of 4,373 people with 9,067 eligible voters. In South Frontenac, the trend falters however. South has a population of 18,646 but on 17,689 eligible voters. Now just because there are all these eligible voters doesn’t mean they’ll all cast ballots. For example, in 2014, there were 17,413 eligible voters but only 6,447 of them participated for a participation rate of 37.02 per cent.

Perfect day for outdoor Warden’s reception

Frontenac County Warden Ron Higgins probably wouldn’t be offended if somebody said he tends to go about things a little differently from most politicians. So, it shouldn’t come as a surprise that Higgins decided to hold his first Warden’s Reception outdoors, at Fernleigh Lodge on Kashwakamak Lake Saturday. Also new to Wardens’ receptions was the inclusion of area business offering everything from local maple syrup to chocolates and boat tours of the lake. Of course what wasn’t new was the Warden’s speech and Higgins used the opportunity to point out some of the highlights of his tenure in the position. After thanking everyone involved including his wife, Wendy, Higgins said: “Recently our Council confirmed continuation of our strategic priorities which were initially set by the previous Council which focused on • Seniors and the aging tsunami• the future of waste management• long range financial planning and economic development.” Higgins said the County was able to secure rides to medical appointments for seniors and that each township would have affordable seniors housing in their township. “In terms of seniors housing, the Islands have completed their project, South Frontenac has an approved business plan in place and North and Central are well underway in terms of developing a business plan to meet seniors needs.” He said the County continues to “support the public works managers and their work with Cambium to assist Council with progress towards the Frontenac County Waste Strategic Goal” which resulted in a grant to fund a study looking for ways to optimize waste diversion. On economic development, he said: “Economic development continues to thrive as the County moves into its final year of Rural Economic Development funding including the Ferry by Foot Promotion Plan, Local Food Awareness Campaign and the Uniform Trail and Wayfinding signage program.”

ADDINGTON HIGHLANDS NEWS

Working group to decide closure date for Kaladar Waste Disposal site

Working group to decide closure date for Kaladar Waste Disposal site

Addington Highlands Council approved the creation of a working group to determine the fate of the Kaladar Waste Disposal site at its regular meeting Tuesday afternoon in Flinton. The site must close next year as a landfill and Roads/Waste Supervisor Brett Reavie told Council tha...

NAEC Trick or Eat

The students of North Addington Education Centre suited up on October 31st in their Campbell’s Soup Costumes, to collect items for the food bank. About ten secondary students were spread out between Flinton, Northbrook, and Cloyne to collect non-perishable food items, instead of tricking or treating for candy. The students are not strangers to supporting the community who supports them. This is the eighth year for the very successful event. We visited as many households as possible, but we know that some houses were missed- especially those on back roads, or not in a very central area. If you have food that you would like for us to pick up, please call Candice Bovard throughout the week at 613-336-8991. On behalf of students and staff, the principal, James Bonham-Carter, would like to thank the community for their contributions to our food drive efforts over the years: “It’s so great to see how everyone takes care of each other. Teaching children academics is only one part of the bigger picture; we need to teach them how to be good people too. A big thank you to the community for investing in our children”. Items can also be dropped off at North Addington, in the main office.

Close, but Hogg back in AH

Henry Hogg was not that surprised that his election margin was narrow this time around, or even that he lost one of the two wards to Alice Madigan, who has never held public office but has been active politically in Denbigh, and was a vocal opponent of a wind turbine proposal that was unpopular with many in the community. Hogg led the debate on council, which resulted in the township supporting the project, based partly on the promise of the establishment of a community fund should wind turbines ever be erected in the township. Hogg received 769 (54%) votes to Madigan’s 653 (46%). In ward 1, Madigan received over 100 more votes that Hogg, but he took ward 2 by a margin of over 200, leading to the overall victory and a 6th term as Reeve. In 2014 Hogg received 71% of the vote against Gerald Bray and in 2010 he was acclaimed. “I was not surprised by the margin,” said Hogg, “I knew it would be close because of the wind turbines and other factors. But a win is a win, no matter what the margin is, and I am happy to keep serving the municipality. I once lost an election by 12 votes, so I know anything can happen. Hogg said that the township will have to do what it can, with its limited resources, “to deal with the inevitable changes that are coming our way.” He said that in this term of council, it will be necessary to at least start looking at new township office space. “When we started out, there were only two people working out of the little office space we have in the basement of the Flinton Recreation Centre. We need something better for the staff we have working out of that office now,” he said. Incumbents ruled the day in Ward 1. Tony Fritsch was comfortably returned for a third time with 531 votes and Kirby Thompson (378 votes) narrowly outpolled former road and waste superintendent Royce Rosenblath (343 votes). Newcomer David Miles was the most popular candidate in Ward 2, receiving 450 votes. Helen Yanch finished second with a 405 and will also return to council. Bill Cox, who has served three terms on council, went down to defeat with 388 votes, 17 less than Yanch. Because Reeve Hogg now lives in Ward 2, the councillor who receives the most votes in Ward 1, will become the Deputy Reeve and second AH rep to Lennox and Addington (L&A) County Council. Tony Fritsch will thus have the opportunity to become Deputy Reeve.

Trick or Eat Strikes Again!

The students of North Addington Education Centre will be suiting up in their Campbell’s Soup costumes on October 31st and knocking on your door! They will be asking for non-perishable food items which will be donated to the local food bank, which is experiencing a shortage of food. About ten secondary students will be spreading out between Flinton, Northbrook, and Cloyne to collect non-perishable food items, instead of tricking or treating for candy.  The students are not strangers to supporting the community who supports them. This is the eighth year for the very successful event. We’re asking community members to contribute what they can. We will have three to four students canvassing each community between approximately 4:00 and 8:00pm. Most will be wearing soup costumes and a very large smile. If we have more students participating than costumes, some students will be in other costumes, but will identify themselves at the door. We are going to visit as many households as possible, but if you have contributions and the food is not picked up, please call Candice Bovard throughout the week at 613-336-8991 and we will pick it up, or items can be dropped off at the school. On behalf of students and staff, the principal, James Bonham-Carter, would like to recognize how special this event is. “I’m quickly seeing how much this community cares for one another.. Thank you for helping our children give back; for helping teach them that we have a responsibility to take care of one another”. If you see students in the community and they are ‘trick or eating’, feel free to ask them to sing or dance for your donation; they are prepared to work for your generosity!

Historical society’s Flickr account tops 1,000 photos

The Cloyne and District Historical Society’s Flickr account recently topped a thousand photos, Ken Hook told the Society’s monthly meeting in Cloyne this week. For the handful of folks unfamiliar with Flickr, it’s an image and video hosting service that’s free to use but uploading content or commenting on a photo requires a registering an account. The Society has had a presence there since 2013. “We have 323 followers, from all around the world,” Hook said. “Like Brazil, France, Austria, Guatemala, Switzerland and the U.S. “Even the State Library from Queensland Australia is a follower — we’re not really sure why.” The Society began the page as part of their commitment to preserve local history and the material can be downloaded for research or presentations. “We do say that commercial use is prohibited because the intent was not for someone to make a profit from,” Hook said. “Although it’s unlikely anyone would be able to.” So far, the site has had 2.1 million views and some of them had led to some interesting comments and connections. For example, one of the most popular photos, with 35,357 views, is of a group of Girl Guides in the back of a Fargo truck in front of Wannamaker’s Store taken 1950. “The Girl Guides International linked to it from their website and one guy commented that it had to be Canadian because that’s the only place you could get Fargo trucks,” Hook said. “I didn’t know that.” Another interesting connection came from a photo in the ‘Carol Lessard collection’ of Quintland, the collection of souvenir shops and attractions that sprung up around Callander Bay in the late ’30s and early ’40s as a result of the popularity of the Dionne Quintuplets. The curator of the Callander Bay Heritage Museum sent an email to the Society saying that this was the only photograph evidence they’ve ever seen of a teepee in front of the clock tower. Apparently, a first nations chief would pose for photographs for tourists but they weren’t sure of the authenticity of the story until seeing the photo on Flickr. Hook was pleased to point out that at 1,081 photos, the Society has a larger presence than the Halifax Municipal Archives, which has 989. “The Deseronto Archives, from whom we got the idea, has 2,024 but they joined in 2008,” he said. But that may change as the Society acquires more images. Perhaps they may catch the Smithsonian Institution (3,486 images) or even the British Museum (1,700,014).

EDITORIALS

  • Remember when ... pot became legal
    It has now been two weeks since marijuana became legal in Canada, and it is also about 10 days, for most Canadians, since the novelty will have worn off. The tv cameras are all gone from the new legal dispensaries, as are the line ups, but apparently not the product…
    Written on Thursday, 01 November 2018 11:30 in Editorials
  • The misguided fear surrounding Proportional Representation
    A recent opinion piece, titled “What history can teach us about proportional representation,” published on September 9 in The Toronto Star, concludes that Proportional Representation (PR) was to blame for the 15 European democracies that fell into dictatorship in history. The basis of this argument was “governments often lacked effectiveness,…
    Written on Thursday, 01 November 2018 11:29 in Editorials
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LETTERS

  • Re – Transportation in Frontenac County
    Frontenac Transportation Services located in Sharbot Lake are still transporting Frontenac County residents to medical, social appointments and shopping. As per their advertisement in The Frontenac News, South Frontenac Community Services are now responsible for arranging transportation for Seniors and disabled adults that are part of their Community Support Program.…
    Written on Thursday, 01 November 2018 11:29 in Letters
  • Re- Cannabis editorial
    The writer of last weeks cannabis editorial seems to be equating cannabis with candy bars, sugary drinks, gasoline, chips, beer & wine. I actually don't believe in over government in many things. Although I choose to wear a bicycle helmet & always wear my atv helmet,  I don't see why…
    Written on Wednesday, 10 October 2018 13:53 in Letters
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