Featured News

Verona Lions ATV Poker Run A Success

Verona Lions ATV Poker Run A Success

Written By: News Staff | Published: July-11-2018 | Category: SOUTH FRONTENAC
Tagged Under: Lions, Verona

Organizers of the first annual Verona Lion’s ATV Poker run did not know what to expect last Saturday morning. “We had only a few tickets sold in advance and we were wondering if the whole...

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Maberly kicks off Canada Day weekend with annual Pie in the Sky event

Maberly kicks off Canada Day weekend with annual Pie in the Sky event

One of the more “celestial” fundraisers in the area for the past several years has been the Maberly Fair’s Pie in the Sky event. It’s a rather simple concept, really. First, y...

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Focus on the frail elderly at Community Services AGM

Focus on the frail elderly at Community Services AGM

Dr. John Muscedere, from Kingston General Hospital and the Queen’s School of Medicine, is also the scientific director for the Canadian Frailty Network. The CFN is dedicated to improving care fo...

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Triathlons, distance runs the order of the day in Sydenham

Triathlons, distance runs the order of the day in Sydenham

Written By: Craig Bakay | Published: July-11-2018 | Category: SOUTH FRONTENAC
Tagged Under: Sydenham, Sports & Recreation

On Sunday, more than 250 athletes ranging in ages from little kids to 80 years old suited up for the 10th annual Somersault Series of races in Sydenham. The series got underway at 8am to avoid the he...

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Back Forty Artisan Cheese opens for season

Back Forty Artisan Cheese opens for season

Written By: Craig Bakay | Published: July-11-2018 | Category: NORTH FRONTENAC
Tagged Under: Mississippi Station, Agriculture, business

The Reggae Band was a couple hours late showing up, but otherwise, spirits were high as Back Forty Artisan Cheese opened up for the season on Saturday at its Mississippi Station location. The home-bas...

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Few contested positions in municipal campaign

There is only one race for Mayor thus far in Frontenac County, and races in only a single district i...

Partial burn bans to the south, total bans to the north

The weather has been and will continue to be hot and dry, and this is the case throughout the region...

About that little problem with the trail

As reported last week, construction on the K&P trail has cost more and taken longer than anyone ...

Township seeks public input on Crow Lake Road through hamlet

Upcoming work on Crow Lake Road is “still in the design phase,” Kevin Hawley of Greer Ga...

Truck deal gone sour works out in end for Central Frontenac

Normally, a contractor defaulting on a contract with a township isn’t a good thing. But in the...

Canada Day bouncy castle recovered

The big blue and gray bouncy castle that adorned Oso Beach on Canada Day has been recovered, said Di...

Garden tour starting small, but has broader ambitions

A tour of some of the most distinctive gardens in the southeast region of South Frontenac is taking ...

Annual Arden cleanup continues with brushing and fallen tree removal

About a dozen people turned out last Friday morning in Arden for what’s become an annual event...

23rd-annual (Annual) Art Exhibition & Sale

“The beauty of Bon Echo Park has served as an inspiration for many generations of artists,&rdq...

Embracing the healing power of nature

For many, nature is balm for a weary soul. It soothes, heals and puts our senses in order. For all ...

NORTH FRONTENAC NEWS

Back Forty Artisan Cheese opens for season

Back Forty Artisan Cheese opens for season

The Reggae Band was a couple hours late showing up, but otherwise, spirits were high as Back Forty Artisan Cheese opened up for the season on Saturday at its Mississippi Station location. The home-base for the popular sheep cheese shop is open Saturdays from 10am to 4pm from now ...

David Young in Concert

David Young is a 19-year-old singer/songwriter from Maine who will be appearing in concert in Ompah on July 19. David has deep roots in the Ompah area and has spent many-a-summer swimming in Palmerston Lake and playing guitar with his grandpa, popular local musician Dave Young. As a boy, David performed in Ompah several times. Over the years, it has been impressive to watch his growth in skill and comfort on stage.   David performs a variety of genres from folk to rock to country and blues. He has played up and down the east coast of Maine and is delighted to be in Ompah again. David is an accomplished guitar player and singer and he has been mentored along the way by his grandpa. David has recorded two folk-rock CDs of mainly original material. In 2016, he released Acousticism, and in 2017, he recorded Midnight Road at Grandpa Dave's recording studio in Ompah. He will have CDs for sale at the concert.   David often performs solo but also has a group called The Rubber Band. However, in Ompah he will be backed up by brother Deven on drums and grandpa Dave on guitar. He will sing many familiar songs along with some of his own material.   David Young will be in concert at the Ompah Community Centre on Thursday, July 19 at 7pm. Admission is $10 with proceeds to the Community Centre. Refreshments will follow the concert.

K & P Trail expansion in North Frontenac unlikely in near future

Expansion of the K & P Trail into North Frontenac and beyond was on the minds of North Frontenac Council at its regular meeting last week in Plevna but there was little optimism that it would happen any time soon. “This will be something for the next Council,” said Mayor Ron Higgins. “The next five Councils,” corrected Dep. Mayor Fred Perry. CAO Cheryl Robson said the CAOs have been discussing it and should have a report coming to all the township councils in the near future. “Richard (Allen, Frontenac County’s manager of economic development) should be meeting with interested groups and exploring partnerships like with Lanark and Renfrew Counties,” said Coun. Denis Bedard. “Richard’s in a difficult position,” said Coun. John Inglis, North Frontenac’s representative on County Council along the Mayor. “There remains a section between Parham and Sharbot Lake that may never be finished because it goes through swamp where there is no track bed. “It seems to me Richard inherited a big white elephant and he has no money to work with. “And it’s a political issue right now because it doesn’t help the townships on the two ends (North Frontenac and Frontenac Islands).”   • • • Just who’s going to direct traffic on Canada Day for the fireworks turned out to be a bit of a touchy subject. It costs extra to have police officers do it but some councilors thought it could be just as easily be handled by the fire department. “Fire services cannot provide traffic control under the Highway Traffic Act,” said Fire Chief/Director of Emergency Services Eric Korhonen. “Firefighters can protect firefighters on the highway but that’s it.” “What section of the act says that?” said Coun. Denis Bedard. “It would be embarrassing to be fined,” said Mayor Ron Higgins. “Council does have another option — do not provide traffic control,” said Korhonen. “(But) there will be a lot of families with children and seniors in attendance.” “We’ve been gouged by the OPP for the last five years and this is more of the same,” said Coun. Gerry Martin. Council voted to have the OPP provide traffic control with Martin voting against and Coun. Wayne Good abstaining (which is counted as a vote against).   • • • Nobody was really saluting the issue of creating a Township flag but the idea is still up for debate. “It will be time consuming and cost us some money because it has to go through the Official Herald of Canada,” said CAO Cheryl Robson. “It will take a long time to get an agreement on a design,” said Coun. Denis Bedard. “You’ll get a thousand opinions.” “It seems to me we haven’t had discussion as to why we should do this,” said Coun. John Inglis. “It’s not an economic development thing,” said Mayor Ron Higgins. “Maybe it’s not as important as it is symbolic,” said Coun. Gerry Martin. “Why couldn’t we use the Township logo on it?” said Coun. Vernon Hermer. “Please don’t,” said Martin.

Clar-Mil Archives Wins Award

On Sat., June 23, CMCA Co-ordinator Brenda Martin, member Sheryl Weber and Mayor Ron Higgins travelled to the Japanese International Centre in Toronto to accept the Dorothy Duncan Ontario Historical Society award. This award recognizes a not-for-profit organization that has demonstrated an outstanding level of service to its region. The year 2017 was a very productive year for conserving local history for future generations, as the Clarendon & Miller Community Archives motto declares. The committee worked diligently to produce three books – Lodges: Past and Present in North Frontenac, Memories of General Stores in North Frontenac, and Historic Tours of North Frontenac. A Virtual Tour component was later launched to complement the tour book. The CMCA also designed ten historic signs that were installed throughout the Township to mark historic sites. Visual exhibits were expanded with the Remembrance Day one being highly praised by the community. The Township of North Frontenac has provided ongoing support to CMCA; in 2017, they provided space to store CMCA display materials, and granted some funding toward both historic signs and a community event to celebrate Lodges and Housekeeping Cottages. The nomination by the Township was a great honour; to be recognized by the Ontario Historical Society with the Dorothy Duncan Award was far beyond CMCA expectations.

Giving thanks and moving up at the North Frontenac Food Bank

There are lots of changes afoot at the North Frontenac Food Bank, both in the background and in public. The first is the ‘retirement’ of the longest serving Food Bank Volunteer, Alex McLeod. Alex first started volunteering for the Food Bank when it was closely tied to the Sharbot Lake Anglican Church and pastor Bruce Geddes. He also worked with Brenda Piatt, one of the early and longest serving directors of the Food Bank, all the way until the present day, a total of 24 years. A plaque was presented to him at a food bank board meeting last Wednesday (June 12). That same day was the last day of the year when the Granite Ridge Lakers Program students were scheduled to come in and do their food sorting shift. For the last four years, the students have come in every Wednesday during the school year to help out with Miss Gregory. And each week over that time Frankie Badour has been there. That day, Frankie, who is about to graduate, was the only student who came out, and we caught him with this photo, a fitting end to mark his commitment to helping out. The big news, that the North Frontenac Food Bank is sharing, is their big move. As of July 1st, they are vacating the basement space that has been graciously donated by Rosemarie Bowick, the former owner of the building at 1095 where the Food Bank has been located since 2014, and also since last November by Ram and Rimpy Kaillon, the current owners of the building. “We are very grateful to Rosemarie and to Ram and Rimpy, but we have been needing a larger, more accessible space for a while,” said Food Bank Director Kim Cucoch, and we have been bequeathed a pretty large sum of money to cover rent for a few years so we are moving to the Sharbot Lake Country Inn, above the restaurant on the street level,” she said. The Food Bank also requires a second fridge to store fresh fruits and vegetables and they will be able to fit them both in the new space. In the past, the Food Bank was serving about 24 families a month in the warm weather and up to 35 in the winter, but that number jumped a couple of years ago to 35 families in the summer and about 50 in the winter. The numbers have remained steady ever since, stressing the capabilities of its soon to be former location. The Food Bank will be closed the week of July 2 to July 6 and will re-open the following at the week at the new location. For further information call 613-532-8855

CENTRAL FRONTENAC NEWS

Township seeks public input on Crow Lake Road through hamlet

Township seeks public input on Crow Lake Road through hamlet

Upcoming work on Crow Lake Road is “still in the design phase,” Kevin Hawley of Greer Galloway told an open house in Sharbot Lake’s Oso Hall last Thursday, held to get public feedback. “Construction could be in the late fall (or August) or next spring,&rd...

Truck deal gone sour works out in end for Central Frontenac

Normally, a contractor defaulting on a contract with a township isn’t a good thing. But in the case of Dilawri Chrysler not being able to fulfill an order for three ½ ton pickups, it’s worked out rather well, at least from the standpoint of saving money. Acting public works manager David Armstrong told Central Frontenac Council at its regular meeting Tuesday in Arden that the Township solicitor had reviewed the contract and considered the non-compliance a breach. “We weren’t the only ones,” said Clerk Cathy MacMunn. “They had some 300 deals they made that they couldn’t fulfill, including four municipalities.” Armstrong said that with the opportunity to review the Township’s needs, they would be better served by buying two 4 X 4 ¾ ton crew cabs. And that’s the good news. The two ¾ tons come in at a price of $62,692, whereas the three ½ tons would have cost $97,000. Council had budgeted $120,000 for new vehicles in this year’s budget. “Upon review, we thought the ¾ tons would suit our needs better as we can get more guys to the job in them, attach a plow to them and hook up trailers to them,” Armstrong said. Coun. John Purdon said he wondered if the matter shouldn’t have come back to council when the breach was discovered but Clerk/Administrator Cathy MacMunn said the vehicles are needed now and will definitely be needed before winter, so they went ahead and called for tenders. “With only one meeting in July and one in August, we felt the need for the equipment meant we should go ahead and call for tenders,” she said. Coun. Phillip Smith and Brent Cameron had another concern. “I’m having difficulties supporting the ¾ tons,” Smith said. “We have two ¾ tons at the fire substations and I think this would have been a good opportunity for fire and public works to get together on how to use those trucks.” “It is something that’s been discussed,” said Cameron. “There is an issue of time here,” said Coun. Vic Heese. “We can’t really reassign those trucks until after the fire plan is done.” “My recollection is that the trucks in the fire stations wouldn’t work for your needs right now,” said Fire Chief Greg Robinson. “They might work next year.” Council approved the acquisition of the two ¾ tons. Smith and Cameron voted against. Kennebec Wilderness TrailsFollowing a presentation by Gord Brown and Kevin Laporte, Council approved several requests regarding the Kennebec Shores Parkland Trails including naming it Kennebec Wilderness Trails. Designating it as Wilderness Trails under the Ontarians with Disabilities Act so that the rather rugged trails won’t have to be accessible to those with disabilities, an expensive, and in this case a near-impossible proposition. Coun. Bill MacDonald pointed out that under the Act, ATVs and snowmobiles would be allowed to use the trails but Brown said they plan to install farm gates at trail entrances. Council also approved $7,500 for said gates, signage, footbridges and parking facilities. The $7,500 was to have come from Parkland Reserves and is the same amount Mark Snider paid for two additional lots when he acquired the Kennebec Shores Waterfront Community. However, Cathy MacMunn told Council that the current amount of funds in Parkland Reserves is “none,” and it would have to come out of general revenues. Council also authorized the use of a 220 metre section of unopened road allowance to extend the yellow trail to Nordic Road as the existing part of the trail was flooded by beaver activity. Ailing MayorDep. Mayor Tom Dewey chaired the meeting in the absence of Mayor Frances Smith who is recovering from eye surgery. “I talked to the Mayor this morning and she is doing well — considering,” he said. New gateFollowing an email from CP Rail, Council approved $87,500 for its part in installing a new warning (gate) system at the Wagarville Road crossing in Parham. There was no word on when the new system would be installed.

Canada Day bouncy castle recovered

The big blue and gray bouncy castle that adorned Oso Beach on Canada Day has been recovered, said District 3 Rec Committee chair Lesley Smith-Merrigan. Bouncy castles like this one are in great demand on Canada Day and picking them up often becomes an exercise in logistics. So, when Orbital Talent owner Brian Wilson asked Smith-Merrigan if she thought it would be OK to leave it on the beach overnight, she of course said yes. Wilson would have somebody pick it up Monday. Only, it turned out not to be OK. Sometime after the fireworks, the castle disappeared and was nowhere to be found. That initiated a Facebook campaign to get it back (with 300 shares) and luckily “a gentleman and his son who were walking along the shore spotted it near the helipad,” Smith-Merrigan said. “Thanks to the Central Frontenac firefighters who went down and recovered it.” The castle weighs in at over 300 pounds, and plus it was staked into the ground, she said. “Our speculation is that whoever took it tied a line to it and towed it behind a boat,” she said. “Then it probably got to be too much for them and they let it go.” Smith-Merrigan said they’ve had a long-standing relationship with Wilson and Orbital Talent and would have been prepared to replace the castle if it came to that. “We were going to be on the hook for it, but luckily it was found,” she said. “We don’t think there was damage, but if there is we’ll work something out with Brian. “If there is damage, it’ll be a lot cheaper to repair than it would have been to buy a new one.”

Annual Arden cleanup continues with brushing and fallen tree removal

About a dozen people turned out last Friday morning in Arden for what’s become an annual event — cleaning up the town. “It’s a Friends of Arden project, but we have support from (acting public works manager) David Armstrong and the Township; they’ll pick up the brush,” said organizer Judy Kennedy. Priority items on this day included brushing on corners to increase visibility, work on the Matson wild trail and cleaning up the big tree that had fallen into the Creek along Anne Street. “It came down during that huge wind storm in May,” Kennedy said. “We decided to leave the one the beaver cut down because it isn’t interrupting flow.” This is the second cleanup event Arden has every year, she said. “There’s the Trash Bash in April, usually before the blackflies come, and then after the flies are gone, we do this,” she said. “We do it every year.” The work usually ends around noon. “The ‘cooking crew’ usually arrives around 11am and when they’re ready, we stop for lunch,” she said. “We’re so lucky.” “This is the easiest village to get people to come out and help.”

23rd-annual (Annual) Art Exhibition & Sale

“The beauty of Bon Echo Park has served as an inspiration for many generations of artists,” says Friends of Bon Echo board member and art show committee member Sue Whyte, “It’s exciting to be able to continue that cultural legacy with the annual Art Sale and Exhibition.” Featuring two dozen local artists showcasing original works, the outdoor event explores the themes of Canadian nature, wildlife and countryside. The 23rd-annual event honours the history of artists in the park, which includes members of the Group of Seven. The three-day event will also involve a number of activities sure to appeal to visitors of all ages. On Saturday and Sunday at 11am, there will be a special presentation by Sciensational Sssnakes, featuring a meet & greet with live reptiles. On Sunday from 11am to 3pm, there will be turtle-themed games, face painting and a colouring contest as part of the Friends’ 2018 turtle conservation campaign. Also, look out for kids’ activities offered by the local library and the park’s Natural Heritage Educators, as well as daily lunchtime barbeques and sweets tent offered by dedicated Friends of Bon Echo volunteers. Bon Echo Provincial Park is a natural wonderland north of Kaladar. It is home to Mazinaw Rock, a majestic granite cliff rising 100 metres out of Mazinaw Lake, the second deepest lake in Ontario. Mazinaw Rock has been the subject of innumerable paintings and photographs and is itself the canvas for hundreds of pictographs painted by Indigenous People. The Friends of Bon Echo Park is a volunteer-driven, not-for-profit organization dedicated to preserving the natural and cultural heritage of Bon Echo Provincial Park. For more information, see Bonechofriends.ca or contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. *** OTHER UPCOMING FRIENDS' EVENTS: Saturday, July 14 – TurtleFest Come shell-ebrate some of the coolest species in the park! Meet real-life turtles as part of the interactive presentation by the Ontario Turtle Conservation Centre and learn how you can help protect these amazing reptiles. Get your face painted, enter the colouring contest and play games that test your skills against a turtles’ many predators! Time: 11am–3pm. Location: Children’s Program Area Saturday, August 25 – AGM & 30th birthday celebration All members are encouraged to join us for our annual general meeting and then stay for our 30th birthday party! The afternoon will also feature a special presentation by guest speaker Phil Careless, biologist from Balsam Lake Provincial Park. Time: 1pm–4pm. Location: Amphitheatre Saturday, September 8 – Cycle Bon Echo This family-friendly cycling event will take participants on a scenic ride from the Lagoon out toward Joeperry Lake and back. Ride the full 17km route or opt for the gentler 4km – perfect for novice riders or families with young children! Riders are encouraged to collect pledges to support ongoing turtle conservation efforts in the park, especially for Blanding’s turtles, which are a species at risk. For more information or to register to ride, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Time: 9am registration, 10am ride begins

SOUTH FRONTENAC NEWS

Verona Lions ATV Poker Run A Success

Verona Lions ATV Poker Run A Success

Organizers of the first annual Verona Lion’s ATV Poker run did not know what to expect last Saturday morning. “We had only a few tickets sold in advance and we were wondering if the whole thing was going to be a bust. We were a bit worried because we had vendors comi...

Focus on the frail elderly at Community Services AGM

Dr. John Muscedere, from Kingston General Hospital and the Queen’s School of Medicine, is also the scientific director for the Canadian Frailty Network. The CFN is dedicated to improving care for the estimated 1 million Canadians who fit the definition of frail that the CFN has developed. He was the keynote speaker at the Annual General Meeting of Southern Frontenac Community Services (SFCSC) last Friday morning (June 22) at the Grace Hall in Sydenham. SFCSC provides programming for populations other than seniors through its food program, homelessness prevention program and other activities, but the agency has a primary focus on providing supports for seniors within the community. As Executive Director David Townsend pointed out in his remarks, SFCSC has had increased uptake for most of its senior’s services over the last year, a 20% increase in the use of the Adult Day Program for the frail elderly, a 25% increase in the number of deliveries through its meals on wheels program, and a 6% increase in the number of rides provided for seniors. “In all of those cases, we are providing more service than we are funded to provide by the LHINS (Local Health Integration Network, SFCS’s primary funder for senior’s programming). We do that because the need is there in the community, and the only reason we are able to do that is because of the funds that we raise each year from the community,” he said. Townsend’s remarks paved their way for Dr. Muscedere, who hobbled to the stage on two crutches. “I was attempting to stave of frailty for myself,” he said, “by taking a hiking trip in Scandinavia. That’s where I got a broken ankle.” He started his presentation by talking about some global numbers. The number of people in the word age 0-64 is expected to go up by 22% by the year 2050. Over the same timeframe, the number of people 65 and over will go up by 188%, the number over 85 by 351% and the number over a hundred will go up by 1004%. He said that this kind of information is behind all of the doom and gloom scenarios about the future of our health care system and the need for long-term care. “People use a phrase that I detest, ‘the aging Tsunami’,” he said, “but the reality is that not all aging is the same, and as more people age, more people will also be aging well, aging healthily through exercise, nutrition, good social interaction, etc. There is a very real difference between chronological and biological aging, and this is important when you look at frailty.” He put up a slide that featured a photo of an old, thin man, crossing a finish line. “This a photo of Ed Whitlock, who set a world record by finishing the Toronto marathon in under four hours at the age of 85. He is not frail by any means, but if you saw him in a hospital bed, you might think he was.” There is a clinical frailty scale, ranging from level 1 (very faint), to level 8 (terminally frail), and the CFN advocates to keep people from slipping down the scale, and for better supports and care systems for those who have reached advanced stages of frailty, from which they cannot recover. As well, dementia plays a key role. “Where dementia is present, the degree of frailty usually corresponds to the degree of dementia,” said one of the slides. In order to deal more effectively with frailty, the CFN advocates for better recognition of frailty, more study, and better organization of the healthcare system. To end, Dr. Muscedere talked about Denmark, a country with a population that has completely revamped its healthcare system over time. Since the late 1980s, Denmark has focussed its resources away from hospitals and long-term care, and towards community-based medicine. In terms of seniors, home-based care is prioritized over long-term care facilities. “We are a very long way from that model in Ontario,” said Muscedere, “and another key piece is that lack of integration in our system as compared to theirs. To address frailty, we need a multi-pronged approach including increased recognition, increasing evidence for its treatment and multi-institutional, multi-jurisdictional efforts to break down silos and implement holistic models of care in the system.” The final point that be made was that frailty is not solely a healthcare issue, and that “better care for seniors living with frailty will only come through improvements in both health and social care.”

Triathlons, distance runs the order of the day in Sydenham

On Sunday, more than 250 athletes ranging in ages from little kids to 80 years old suited up for the 10th annual Somersault Series of races in Sydenham. The series got underway at 8am to avoid the heat of the date and to accommodate many participants who travelled considerable distances, said race director Maryanne Takala. Sydenham’s Takala is no stranger to triathlon as her son, Scott, has competed in World’s. Competitors signed up for eight events ranging from Olympic triathlon to kids’ fun runs as varying race courses dominated downtown Sydenham and The Point Park. Here are the results for the top events:   Olympic TriathlonTop Male – Michael Casista – 2:06:27Top FM – Maia Idzikowski – 2:27:12   Olympic Tri RelaySolitutes (John, Jack and Tom Glassco from Sydenham) 2:15:47   Sprint TriathlonMale – Clive Morgan – 1:07:53Female – Heather Low – 1:09:43   Half MarathonJack Kilislian – 1:54:36Marigold Edwards – 2:28:10   Kids RunTop Female and Winner of the 2 Km race –   Avery Blanch Hinch 9 years old - 10:42Top Male and youngest runner , David Owen 5 years old – 22:15   5KmMale - Cody Harding – 20:5Female - Val Hopkins – 24:43   10KmMale – Jim Townsend -  42:06Female – Tania Storms - 52:04

Garden tour starting small, but has broader ambitions

A tour of some of the most distinctive gardens in the southeast region of South Frontenac is taking place on Sunday, July 22, from 10:30am to 2:30pm. Nona Marriotti, a garden lover and former chair of the board of Southern Frontenac Community Services (SFCS), came up with the idea for the tour because she loves gardens and knows that many of her neighbours in the Perth Road/Inverary vicinity are avid gardeners as well. She also wanted to plan an event that would benefit SFCS. She reached out to the local gardening community and as a result has come up with a seven-garden tour that includes locations in the Spooner Road area of North Kingston, as well as Inverary, Sunbury, Perth Road and a location in Sydenham. The Grace Centre in Sydenham will be open with a “Come and Go Tea” and refreshments from 11:30am to 1pm, and its community garden project will be available for viewing as well. However, the focus of the tour will be on some of the unique private gardens that will be open to the public for one day only. These gardens are as individual as the people who built them and were all made to reflect and complement the features of the landscapes and the buildings on the properties,” said Nona of the seven locations. “We will be letting people who decide to participate on the tour know the locations of the gardens when they purchase a ticket for the tour,” she added. The gardens on the tour include a heritage orchard, perennial gardens with artistic touches and added features, flower and vegetable gardens integrated with the landscape, and more. “This is a start,” said Nona. “I have a four-year plan to bring this tour to all corners of South Frontenac, but that was too much for the first year. There is a lot of variety in the properties and the gardens that are on the tour, and the gardeners who have been working on their own for years are excited to talk about what they have built, so it should be a lot of fun for everyone.” Tickets are $10 and they are available at the following locations: Sydenham One Stop, Memory Lane Flowers, the Grace Centre, Lavalees Inverary Store, and Northway Home Hardware (Inverary). A limited number have been printed, so hurry over to get yours today.

Sydenham Siblings Team Up for Success

Sydenham Lake Canoe Club participated in their first regatta of the season at the Gananoque Canoe Club on Saturday, July 7. Sisters Kiera, age 9, and Charlotte Wilson, age 6, achieved podium success early in the season, competing in the U13 kayaking category. Kiera Wilson received Gold in her K2, Silver in C15 and K1; Charlotte Wilson received Gold in K2, Silver in C15 and a 5th in K1; Twins Mathieu and Nicholas Symons received Gold in K2; Nicholas received Silver in K1; Clare Swinton received Silver in K1 and Jessica Moscrop received a 6th in K1. SLCC is proud of all of these paddlers and look forward to seeing further success at the upcoming Carleton Place regatta.

FRONTENAC COUNTY NEWS

Few contested positions in municipal campaign

Few contested positions in municipal campaign

There is only one race for Mayor thus far in Frontenac County, and races in only a single district in North, South and Central Frontenac as the deadline for nominations nears. In North Frontenac, Mayor Ron Higgins is running for re-election, and incumbent Fred Perry is the only ...

Fire ban update

Total ban in Addington Highlands, North Frontenac, Lananrk Highlands - campfires only in Central and South Frontenac by Jeff Green The weather has been and will continue to be hot and dry, and this is the case throughout the region. But fire permitting and the imposition of fire bans is overseen at the township level, so people might need a municipal overlay on their GPS if they want to know whether they can light a match. Here is an overview as of Tuesday morning, July 10, at 11:30 am In South Frontenac there is a Level 1 burn ban on. Camping and cooking fires are permitted under a Level 1 burn ban, however fireworks, open air burning and incinerators fires are not permitted. In Central Frontenac there is a Level 2 burn ban on currently. A Level 2 burn ban in Central Frontenac is identical to a Level 1 burn ban in South Frontenac. Camping and cooking fires are permitted, but all other burning is prohibited. In North Frontenac, Addington Highlands, and Lanark Highlands a total ban is on. Fires are not permitted at all. Camp and cooking fires and fireworks are forbidden. Meanwhile, Tay Valley township has no fire ban on. (Editors Note – it pays to check your local township’s website for updates. The information in this article changed twice while it was being written)

Canada Day 2018 - Photos

The Canada Day summer kickoff weekend was enjoyed by revellers across the region. Tricyclists in Sydenham   Canadaliens wearing their antennae in Sharbot Lake   Royal Canadian Regiment vets hitting the water in Ottawa on their way down the Rideau Canal to Kingston. They will be in South Frontenac at the Upper and Lower Brewera Locks this weekend.   Canada Day was a great day on the water for 8-year-old Reid Webb; he caught himself a nice 5lb bass, right here locally, from his secret spot on Sydenham Lake. As you can see, Reid is all smiles at his Canada Day catch. If you see Reid, perhaps he might give you some fishing tips. What a great way to make memories during Family Fishing week, which wraps up on July 7 for fishing without a licence.

Ten years and $3.7 million later, K&P Trail is dead in the water north of Tichborne, for now

The K&P Trail may be suffering from the curse of the K&P railroad. The old Kick and Push, as it was not always affectionately called back in the day, was originally intended to run between Lake Ontario and the Ottawa River, from Kingston to Pembroke, K to P. However, costs were high and the money ran out, leaving a K&P that ran only from K to C, Kingston to Calabogie. Now, long after the K&P shut down, a trail being constructed on its track bed, which will bring the Cataraqui trail and Frontenac County into the Trans Canada Trail network, finds itself stalled at kilometre 64.5, of its intended 77 kilometre length, just about a kilometre north of the Bradshaw Road in Central Frontenac. There are two related problems. The trail is under water for at least a 500 metre stretch in that swampy location, water that is 60 cm deep in places, and there is no money left in the construction budget to deal with the problem. And there is another flooded spot further to the north as well. “To put it bluntly, work is grinding to a halt” Richard Allen told a meeting of Frontenac County Council last week (June 20). The estimated cost to complete the two flooded sections and the rest of the work remaining for the K&P trail to join up with the east-west trans Canada trail just south of Sharbot Lake is over $650,000, which will need to be raised somehow as there are no granting programs available currently to help cover the costs. And that $650,000 is by no means a firm number. Pointing out that the flooded sections are complex and may also present “environmental challenges” Allen recommends that an engineering firm be hired, at a cost of $25,000, to do an assessment and present detailed designs before the work is undertaken. Only when that work is done will it be possible to determine the actual cost for the two flooded sections. In current cost estimates, the price to complete them both is set at $310,500. Construction will not proceed in any meaningful way in 2018, with a best case scenario that the work will be done in 2019 or 2020. This might come as a surprise to residents because a ceremonial trail opening event took place last June in Sharbot Lake as part of the year long Canada 150 celebrations in Central Frontenac. Even though the trail was not complete at that point, it was expected to be done by the end of 2017 or by Canada Day 2018 at the very latest. In a telephone interview after last week’s county meeting, Richard Allen said that at that time he was just becoming aware of the extent of the flooding. “I had only been with the county for six months or so at the time and while I had heard in the spring of last year that there were flooding issues north of Bradshaw road, it was a little later on that I saw how serious it was,” he said. “When it is done, that will be the jewel of the trail since it is a beautiful stretch of land, but getting there will not be easy.” Loans or the re-allocation of some federal infrastructure grant money are two options that were mentioned at the June 20 meeting as ways of finding the new money without going directly to county ratepayers to fund it. “It’s not the kind of loan where you can go to bank and talk about a return on investment,” said South Frontenac Mayor Ron Vandewal, “it’s not like you can project a return of three dollars for every dollar invested.” “More like a one dollar return for every 3 dollars invested,” said Deputy Warden Dennis Doyle, the Mayor of Frontenac Islands Township. County staff are proposing another option to fund the completion of the trail, an allocation from Federal Gas Tax funds, funds that are currently controlled by local townships. A proposal will be brought forward at the next County meeting in July to establish a county roads system, on paper only, in order access provincial infrastructure money under the Ontario Community Infrastructure Fund (OCIF). The county would then allocate those monies to township public works projects, freeing up the townships to upload some of their gas tax money to be used on the trail. “It would be a trade off, but the townships would see a net increase funding for their own infrastructure needs, said County Chief Administrative Officer Kelly Pender. “OCIF money cannot be spent on trail construction but gas tax money can.” Central Frontenac Mayor Frances Smith said “it might be time to look at private sector money for the trail.” Last week’s presentation from Richard Allen included, for the first time, an account of how much money has been spent developing the trail since 2008, when the project first appeared on the county books. The total spent so far is $3.7 million. Of that about $1.1 million came from successful grant applications for trail construction. A further $2.2 million came from more generic grants that the county received and then allocated to the trail, including $1.7 million in federal gas tax monies, and $383,000 came from reserve funds. There has been no direct financial levy to Frontenac County ratepayers for K&P trail construction costs thus far. None of the politicians who decided to commit Frontenac County to building the K&P trail back in 2006 and 2007, nor any of the senior staff members at Frontenac County, are still there today, as the gravel hits the swamp.

Arrow is extension of the soul for archery club

Most people lose themselves in the things they love. Conversely, they often find themselves there, too. Sitting in a coffee shop in early June, 62-year-old retired military officer Ralph Kennedy talks with a smile about the sport he loves. “I love archery. It’s a lot of fun,” says Kennedy, the outgoing President of the Kingston Archery Club. “I’ve always liked shooting and archery has the advantage of not needing a gun ownership. You can also reuse your ammunition. Gun ownership is very complex right now. Bows are simple.” A resident of Kingston, Kennedy describes the challenges of the sport made popular by the movie franchise, The Hunger Games. “I think the best term is a combination of focus and relaxation,” he explains. “You have to focus every shot to be good, but you can’t shoot if you’re tense. Your best shots are your most relaxed shots. To achieve that combination takes practice.” Estimated to be more than 153 years old, the club is located in Frontenac County. “We’re nestled between two swamps and swarming with mosquitos,” the president says lightheartedly about the inconspicuous shooting range located at the foot of Fairmount Home. “Actually, we’d love to own the property because our future would be more secure.” Tenants for the past 38 years, the archery club is working with the county on a formal agreement to rent a beautiful parcel of land with a glen and natural forest. “Last year, county staff mentioned we don’t have a formal agreement in place,” Kennedy explains. “We’re currently in the process of working with the staff of the County of Frontenac to formalize that arrangement. We’ve been here for 38 years and have been doing a good job taking care of the place. That’s not going to change.” Walking onto the range, it is clear the club has been a responsible steward. Targets are positioned safely at the end of a clearing and a well-marked path indicates a range burrowed carefully in the forest. A shed houses equipment for members and guests. The air is filled with the smell of pine needles. “The outdoor range chews up a fair bit of the registration money,” says the president about the use of membership fees. “We also pay to use the basement of St. Luke’s Church in the winter and we pay for insurance through Archery Canada and the Ontario Association of Archers.” Adults and junior members are asked to pay a fee for full access to the sport all year round, visitors and guests 12 and under can shoot for free. Anyone 19 and younger can participate in tournaments for free. There is also equipment for guests to use on Thursday evenings when the club meets at 6 pm for a fun hour of shooting. “The club is a good way to give back to sport,” says Kennedy. “You meet people and you can help people who are new to archery.” Kennedy would like to see the 75-member club continue to gain new members, especially youth. “I’d like to see more youth involved. We’d like more people to take advantage of our range and services,” he confirms. “For us, the big thing is to promote archery in the community.” Once consisting mostly of hunters, the club is now composed of many people interested in target shooting. Members range from children to seniors. “We probably have 60 per cent males and 40 per cent females,” the president estimates about the ratio of men to women. “Saying that, we’re seeing a slow, but steady increase in the number of women interested in the sport.” Poised to step down after six years of leadership, Kennedy is looking forward to attending events as a member rather than a club leader. This means he can spend more time enjoying the sport instead of helping with administrative duties. One of the projects he helped create is the sale of handmade arrow pens. Constructed by club members from damaged arrows and salvaged/donated components, the pens are $5 each and benefit the Kingston Humane Society. In 2017, the club used the pen sales to donate $250 to charity. Although it is just one of many accomplishments by Kennedy and the club, the president is still looking forward to stepping down to give another volunteer the opportunity and experience he enjoyed. “My cat herding days are coming to an end,” he says with a friendly laugh about the imminent end of his presidency. “I don’t mind cat herding, but I’m getting cat herded out.” To learn more about the Kingston Archery Club or to purchase a beautiful handcrafted arrow pen, visit http://kingstonarcheryclub.org/ or find them on Facebook. People interested in trying archery are encouraged to visit the club Thursday evenings from 6 to 7 pm. New members are welcome.

ADDINGTON HIGHLANDS NEWS

Addington Highlands in good shape financially says auditor

Addington Highlands in good shape financially says auditor

“Your debt load is under control and you seem to be managing your expenses well,” Secker, Ross & Perry accountant Adam Young told Addington Highlands Council at its regular meeting Tuesday in Flinton. Young was presenting Council with its draft financial statemen...

Recycle plastic baits and save the fish

Tim Snider of Cloyne brought it to the attention of Conservationists Of Frontenac and Addington that fish from local lakes were often found to have undigested plastic baits in their digestive systems. This seems to be a growing problem as the baits are very effective and widely used by anglers. The Ontario Federation of Hunters and Anglers has recommended that anglers be careful to remove all damaged plastic baits from the area of lakes and streams as they are likely to be eaten if they are in the water. In the USA they can be sent to a company, “REBAITS” that then recycles them into new baits. COFA has responded to the issue by placing signs and collection boxes at area boat launches. Please save all of your damaged plastic baits and put them in the boxes for proper disposal.

Smart’s Mercantile grand opening set for Canada Day

Located on highway 41 near the southern end of Mazinaw Lake, not far from Bon Echo Park, Smart’s Marina has been serving the boating needs of Mazinaw Lake residents and Bon Echo Park visitors for many years. Now, thanks to the ambitions of Ange Defosse, office manager at the marina, a new business is taking hold in the marina store, Smart’s Mercantile. The idea for the store came from a visit Ange took to some other cottage areas, including Prince Edward County. “When I saw that they were offering to visitors, I thought we could start to bring in local food and arts to make our region a better tourist destination,” Ange said. “Ange had the idea for this. She came to me with it and I said she could go for it. She made it happen. She got in touch with local producers to see if they wanted to sell their products here, and she approached Frontenac County for some leads and followed them up. It’s amazing what she has found and how many people are excited about it,” said Pauline Smart, who owns the marina with her husband Steve. “Over the winter, we began working, we worked on redoing our convenience store and are very excited about the outcome. We have changed the interior and brought in some new products to focus on local products and small businesses in our area, while still keeping our ice cream bar, convenience grocery items, and camping goods,” Ange added. Smart’s Mercantile is featuring a wide range of local and regional products including: Arden Pottery, Blue Tick Blacksmithing, Backwoods Honey, T&D Sauces, DFC BBQ Sauce, J.R. Watkins products, County Coffee, Abby’s Gardens Preserves, Hart ‘N Hart Mazinaw themed apparel, Farmacy Bath and Beauty, Ree’s Family maple products, Backwood Country Creations, and the list goes on. The store started with a soft opening in early June and has already created a buzz in the local community in advance of Sunday’s grand opening/summer kickoff event. The celebration runs from 11am-4pm on Sunday. The meat for the rib and sausage BBQ is being provided by another new local business, Milligans Meats, which is located in the former Cloyne Home Hardware Store. DFC BBQ sauces will be on hand for taste testing their sauces with the BBQ. Other vendors, including J.R. Watkins, Backwoods Country Creations and T&D Sauces, and others, will also be there. To celebrate Canada Day, free Sundaes (one per person) will be served, and there is a 10% discount on all local items in the store. Smart’s Mercantile will be open 8am-7pm Monday to Saturday all summer, 9am-7pm on Sundays.

A familiar face is now bringing support and information about dementia to Addington Highlands, North and Central Frontenac.

Pam Lemke has worked in social services in Sharbot Lake and Northbrook for almost 25 years, most recently for Land O’Lakes Community Services. As of March 9th, she has been working for the Alzheimer Society of Kingston, Frontenac Lennox and Addington. Some days she works out of an office located in the Lion’s Hall in Northbrook, some days she is at the Rural Frontenac Community Services Adult Centre in Sharbot Lake, but she could be anywhere in between visiting with families all over the region. While the Alzheimer Society has had workers in ‘the North’ before, Lemke brings a wealth of local contacts and a commitment to serving the community where she lives. “It has gone extremely well, and I’ve been very busy from the day I started,” she said when contacted from Northbrook early this week. I have received a lot of referrals and been able to meet with people living with dementia and their families. I can help them get connected to services such as Adult Day Programs, and I bring all the resources of the Alzheimer Society as well. Much of the work of the Society is centred on support for caregivers and that part of the job is important to Lemke. “It can be a family member, a neighbour or a friend, and I am happy to meet with them to see what they need. The Society has been, and remains active at Pine Meadow Nursing Home. Volunteers with the Golden Girls and the Old Pharts have been visiting the home once a month for several years, interacting one on one with residents in the home. “It’s great to work with them at Pine Meadow. They have so much knowledge that I can tap into.” The most recent initiative of the Alzheimer Society is called “Dementia Friendly Kingston”. “Dementia Friendly Kingston” is modelled after a similar program in Bobcaygeon, and is intended to help people with dementia feel included, independent and supported in the community. Through training sessions, that are about one hour in length, local businesses and other service providers will have the opportunity to become “Dementia Friendly”. These training sessions are intended to improve the community’s awareness and understanding of dementia, and improve services for those who are diagnosed with dementia. Businesses and organisations who have been trained will be identifiable by the blue umbrella window decal The blue umbrella, with its many points, signifies the various forms of dementia. Businesses with this decal will have been educated about the type of assistance someone with dementia may need. Individuals with dementia will be offered the choice of wearing a blue umbrella pin. Wearing the pin lets businesses and service providers know that you have dementia. This allows them to provide improved customer service to suit your needs. The Alzheimer Society recommends wearing the pin in a visible location so that service providers can see it, such as on a jacket lapel or the front of a t-shirt. Implementing “Dementia Friendly” communities throughout the region is the next goal that Pam Lemke will be taking on. For information about the Dementia Friendly program or any other services, or for answers to questions about dementia, call Pam at 1-800-266-7516 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Lennox & Addington Economic Development to Host Tourism “Speed Dating” event on June 26th

All Lennox and Addington County based businesses in tourism and related sectors are invited to attend a special "Naturally L&A” Speed Dating Event at the Lennox & Addington County Museum & Archives on Tuesday, June 26th at 7pm. This event is hosted by the Lennox & Addington Economic Development Office. The evening will provide participants with an opportunity to learn about fellow operators in the L&A County community and find out about a number of new tourism initiatives that are currently underway. It will be a fast paced event providing an opportunity to interact one-on-one with other tourism stakeholders in Lennox & Addington County. Businesses will be able to promote their tourism offerings and look to build partnerships and experiences with other businesses. "We believe that attraction operators, restaurant owners, lodging providers, and retailers will find this event beneficial.." stated Stephen Paul, Director of Community & Development Services with Lennox & Addington County. "Bringing businesses together under the same roof will help them to better understand what is available in our county. We hope that this will drive customer referrals and foster business partnerships.” All L&A County based businesses in tourism and related sectors are encouraged to attend this free event. Businesses are welcome to bring along brochures and publications to share with those in attendance. The event venue is the L&A County Museum & Archives, located at 97 Thomas Street East in Napanee. For more information and to register, please visit www.lennox-addington.on.ca or call Rob Plumley at 613-354-4883 ext. 3271.

EDITORIALS

  • About that little problem with the trail
    As reported last week, construction on the K&P trail has cost more and taken longer than anyone thought it would and will require a new infusion of cash, and some careful engineering as well. And once it is done, the section that is currently flooded out will require a long-term…
    Written on Wednesday, 11 July 2018 12:34 in Editorials
  • Saved from the Socialist Hordes
    There was a moment in the Ontario election campaign when voters were telling pollsters they were seriously concerned about supporting Doug Ford for Premier. Ford has been a polarizing figure in Toronto City politics and has no history on the provincial scene, and is connected in many people’s mind with…
    Written on Wednesday, 13 June 2018 12:44 in Editorials
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LETTERS

  • Re Poor Roads in North Frontenac
    North Frontenac has some of the nicest scenic motorcycle roads in Ontario, but the roads at the west end of the county are in in such disrepair that they have become unsafe for a two-wheel vehicle. Roads like Harlowe Road, Meyers Cave Road, Kashwakamak Road, and last but not least,…
    Written on Wednesday, 11 July 2018 12:32 in Letters
  • New Ford government energy policy complaint
    The good news is that despite a record-setting heat wave, our energy consumption is well below the last major, but shorter, heat wave 10 years ago. Despite increased population, programs to reduce energy use have had a significant effect. The bad news is, on virtually the same day that reduced…
    Written on Wednesday, 11 July 2018 12:32 in Letters
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