General Interest

This past winter and spring has seen a rash of ATV and Snowmobile fatalities in Ontario, including an ATV death in North Frontenac whereby the causation was deemed alcohol related. That day, the OPP laid numerous charges for failure to wear a helmet etc. We saw a spike in Snowmobile drownings across the province this past year. At my property (Marble Lake Lodge), I regularly observe ATVers with kids under 10 years old, riding without helmets, intoxicated, and without plates or insurance. Same for sledders, even while the OFSC's Snowmobile trails were closed due to unsafe trail and ice conditions, we observed numerous trail riders breaking the law and trespassing on closed trails. Last summer, with a Tornado Earning issued by Environment Canada one afternoon,…

Wolfe Island Garden Party set for this weekend

Written by  |  Wednesday, 14 June 2017 12:41  |  Published in General Interest
The Wolfe Island Garden Party is a three day event that will feature music on Thursday and Friday Nights (June 15 and 16) and a day of open houses at farms and arts studios on the island and  much more music, food and local beer on Saturday (June 17). The event has more or less developed into this form after Janette Hasse approach local musician and producer Chris Brown about a fund raising benefit. Hasse has been working with the students at Marysville Public School on  a community garden project at the Wolfe Island Medical Centre, which she is planning to expand to the grounds of the new senior’s building that is being constructed nearby and build a greenhouse. Chris Brown has been producing music…

OPP Raising Concerns About Boating Safety

Written by  |  Wednesday, 14 June 2017 12:30  |  Published in General Interest
The Ontario Provincial Police (OPP) have already investigated three boating fatalities this spring, with the same contributing factors being reported as in previous years. Two of the three fatal incidents involved capsized canoes. During the third mishap, the vessel sank. Alcohol/drug consumption was involved in two of the incidents. Only one of the three deceased was wearing a life jacket or personal floatation device (PFD) at the time. One victim was a passenger.     These details are all too common in OPP-investigated boating incidents from year to year. Last year (2016), 16 vessel operators and seven (7) passengers were killed in 19 boating incidents on OPP-patrolled waterways. Nine (9) of the incidents involved a capsized vessel. Six (6) victims fell overboard. Alcohol consumption was a…

Seniors softball seems to be gaining in popularity in north country

Written by  |  Wednesday, 14 June 2017 12:28  |  Published in General Interest
Remember when you were a kid, before school started, at recess, lunch hour, whenever you weren’t in class but were still required to be on the school grounds. Chances are, if there was no snow on the ground, every diamond on the property would be in use. In many Southern Ontario school grounds, the game was called ‘scrub.’ Call it what you will, softball, lob-ball, slo-pitch, whatever, the image of a ball glove slung over a bicycle’s handlebars was common. When school let out for the summer, the game continued, often on open fields, with bases defined by dragging your heel in the dirt to delineate a less-than-perfect square. Often, rules were set by stomping home plate, as in ‘no lead-offs’ and/or ‘call your field’…

Special edition for Canada Day

Written by  |  Wednesday, 07 June 2017 13:32  |  Published in General Interest
The Frontenac News publishes a Canada Day edition each year to help publicise all the events that take place on and around Canada Day in the various communities we serve in our paper and online versions. It is our way to kick off the summer season. The summer of ‘17 is shaping up to be extra busy since it is the summer of Canada 150 and in our June 29th edition, as well as on Frontenac-Live.ca we are featuring a comprehensive guide of events on July 1st and throughout the summer season. We are reaching out to groups, organisations and businesses who are planning events this summer so they can be included in this edition through our normal means, but it is hard to get…

Phrag, Turtles and Other Things

Written by  |  Wednesday, 31 May 2017 14:14  |  Published in General Interest
Phragmites (say 'frag-might-ees') or European Common Reed is that huge plant with the flag of seeds on top that you are seeing more and more along roads in our area. It was probably imported from Eurasia mid-1800's in straw packing materials and first seen growing in Canada in Nova Scotia in 1910. For about 40 years it was unremarkable. But lately its spread is truly remarkable. It is so common in southern Ontario that locals call it simply "phrag". Predictions are that the great marsh (over 3000 hectares or 7500 acres) at Long Point on Lake Erie will be completely taken over by Phragmites in about five years. Elimination of a marsh by phrag happens because the reed grows so densely and its stalks are…

Bags and berms are no solution

Written by  |  Wednesday, 24 May 2017 09:55  |  Published in General Interest
Recently, a flood victim said "the walls I have built are not strong enough – I will make them stronger and bigger" He summarized the widespread philosophy that pops up with every flood. Hold it back with walls of sandbags and keep it in its proper channel with berms. An engineering prescription for floods. Stewardship of the watershed is a better, cheaper and longer-lasting prescription. Instead of 'here is the water—fight it', ask 'where does the water come from? How can the flood peak be prevented before it threatens us?' Water that comes as rain and meltwater does not just run down our rivers. Rain is water that evaporated from the earth into the atmosphere. When it falls back to earth, it can be absorbed…
As numerous motorcyclists and off-road vehicle enthusiasts plan to hit roads and trails during the Victoria Day weekend, the Ontario Provincial Police (OPP) is pointing out trends that can make these seasonal drivers vulnerable to fatal collisions. According to OPP traffic data, a significant number of motorcyclists continue to be killed in collisions that are no fault of their own. In 2016, 10 of the 28 motorcycle drivers killed on OPP-patrolled roads were reportedly not at fault in the crashes that claimed their lives. The previous year painted an even grimmer picture for safe motorcycle drivers, with more than half (14) of the 27 who died in road crashes in 2015 reportedly being not at fault. In contrast, OPP data reveals a significant number of…

Fieldwork adds sound installations for 2017 exhibition season

Written by  |  Wednesday, 17 May 2017 13:58  |  Published in General Interest
For its 10th edition, the Fieldworks installation ‘gallery’ on Old Brooke Road southeast of Maberly decided to explore the world of sound, adding six new interactive installations by artists Jesse Stewart & Matt Edwards, Hilary Martin & Ranjit Bhatnagar, Annette Hegel & Deborah Margo, Matt Rogalsky & Laura Cameron, Doug Van Nort and Nicola Oddy. “We’d like to begin by acknowledging that this is on traditional Algonquin land,” said Susie Osler, one of the original four collective members in her opening remarks. “And we pay homage to one of the four Algonquin elements, the air, with sonic representations.” As such, this year’s edition is entitled Soundwork — An exploration of sound in art. For those unfamiliar with the Fieldworks concept, it’s essentially an ‘art walk’…

Wild Parsnips and Clearview Herbicide

Written by  |  Wednesday, 17 May 2017 13:02  |  Published in General Interest
Rapid spread of Wild Parsnip (Pastinaca sativa) and Giant Hogweed or Cow Parsnip (Heracleum mantegazzianum) along our roadsides has set off spray programs using the Dow herbicide Clearview in eastern Ontario municipalities. Alarmist media reports warned us to not go near the parsnips without eye and full body protection. Many were alarmed. But many others, particularly farmers, had been living with the parsnips for decades. They managed because they learned that the severe skin burning and eye damage from the parsnips was caused by plant sap that was activated by exposure to sunlight. Burns could be avoided by washing off the oily sap with soap and water before going out in the sun. So there was an alternative to widespread spraying with Clearview. Health Canada's…

After 12 years, Marco gets his flag

Written by  |  Wednesday, 10 May 2017 12:59  |  Published in General Interest
Marco Smits, the communication’s officer with Frontenac County, is also a proud transplanted Canadian of Dutch heritage. When he became a Canadian citizen in 2005, someone told him that the flag that is raised over the Peace Tower each day is only used for one day and is then given away. He looked into it and found out that Canadian Citizen’s could put in a request for one of the flags. So he wrote a letter to the appropriate Ministry, asking for a flag. Then, he heard nothing, not even a confirmation that his letter had arrived. 12 years later, early in the new year, he received a notice from the Canadian goverment which began "In response to your letter dated May 2005 we are..."…

The view on Clearview is anything but

Written by  |  Wednesday, 10 May 2017 12:18  |  Published in General Interest
Residents of Tay Valley Township have been fighting a spraying program that has been underway on County roads in Lanark County for two years, and similar concerns are now being expressed by the Lennox and Addington Stewardship (L&A) Council over a similar program set to start up in L&A this month. In both cases the roads are being sprayed with Clearview, which is an approved herbicide, and the target species is wild parsnip, which has been associated with painful burns among some people who have been exposed to its toxic juices.While at least two Lanark County Townships have opted not to spray (Tay Valley and Mississippi Mills) the county roads in those townships were sprayed last year and will be sprayed again this year. Last…

Snapping Turtles Now Protected

Written by  |  Wednesday, 10 May 2017 11:33  |  Published in General Interest
After many years of informed concern by conservationists, the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources has finally made it illegal to hunt snapping turtles. Snapping turtles have been listed as species of Special Concern both Federally and by Ontario but that gave them no protection and OMNR continued to state a limit of two turtles in their list of game animals. Mortality is critical to snapping turtles because their earliest  reproduction is delayed for up to 20 years. Even then only 7 out of 10,000 eggs survive to adulthood. These characteristics of their reproductive life history combine to mean that, on average, female snappers must live until they are at least 25 if the population is not to decrease. Egg-laying females search for sandy, south-facing slopes…
A group of about 30 walkers, along with two support vans, will be passing through Addington Highlands and Central Frontenac this weekend on their way to Ottawa where they will be going to Parliament to demonstrate in favour of the adoption of Bill C262, a Private members bill that was drafted by MP Romeo Saganash, which is aimed at ensuring “that the laws of Canada are in harmony with the United Nations Declarationon the Rights of Indigenous Peoples” (UNDRIP). The walk itself, which is co-sponsored by the Mennonite Church of Canada and Christian Peacemaker Teams: Indigenous Peoples Solidarity was inspired by the report of the Commission on Truth and Reconciliation, in particular number 48 in the Calls to Action that accompanied the report. Number 48…

Vegetable of the Year – more like vegetable family of the year

Written by  |  Wednesday, 03 May 2017 11:04  |  Published in General Interest
The vegetable of the year for 2017 is more than just one vegetable, it’s an entire family, even an entire category. They used to be called cruciferous vegetables, not because of their crunch but because of their small flowers. The four petal flower looks something like a cross, hence the latin name crucifera referring to the crucifixion. Botanists now call them brassicas and farmers call them cole plants. They include all of the vegetables in the cabbage and mustard family, a powerhouse of nutrition and strong flavours. As garden plants they are very well suited to cooler climate, and are generally pretty easy to grow. They include cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, Brussel sprouts, collards, bok choy, nappa, kale, kohlrabi, radish, tatsoi, turnip, and rutabaga and more.…
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