News Staff

News Staff

The Peoples Party of Canada, which was formed a few months ago by Maxime Bernier has established a riding association in Lanark Frontenac Kingston. They are looking for a candidate to run in the Federal election which is slated for October of this year.

David Motton, of Sharbot Lake, is the riding association President and he said that there are executive members from the Perth area and north Kingston as well. Motton, who describes himself as a life long conservative, joined the new party because, he said, it is the only party that stands up for “real conservative values” which include free speech and small government.

Before starting up the new party, Bernier announced, in August of 2018, that he was leaving the Conservatives. The announcement came 15 months after he was narrowly defeated in a leadership contest by the current party leader Andrew Scheer.

Motton moved to Sharbot Lake three years ago to live in the senior’s housing complex on Clement Road, and is a board member of both the North Frontenac Not-for Profit Housing Corporation and the Central Frontenac Not For Profit Housing Corporation. He said that he prefers to play and administrative and advisory role in the coming campaign in the hope that the party can attract a younger candidate (he is in his 60’s) but said he will step forward as a candidate if necessary.

Scott Reid, who has represented the current riding and its predecessor ridings since 2000, first as a Canadian Alliance party member and since 2004 with the Conservative Party of Canada, indicated in December that he is more than likely to be running again.

In his remarks during the inaugural meeting of the new Frontenac County Council, he talked about his good working relationship with Kingston and the Islands MP Mark Gerretsen, who represents the Liberal Party.

“Mark and I are the only ones here who will be facing an election next year, but given the voting records in our ridings, we will both likely be working together during the next term. When the interests of this region are at stake, we like to work as a team even if we represent different parties’ in the house, he said.

Motton said that he thinks Reid is in for “a big surprise when the election rolls around because the Peoples Party of Canada will be shaking things up. This will be a good riding for us.”

Back when the new People’s Party was forming, Reid explained in a blog why he was not considering leaving the Conservative Party for the new Bernier led party. He pointed out that even though Max Bernier describes himself as a Libertarian, which Reid does as well, his policies are not consistent with Reid’s understanding of Libertarianism.

One issue Reid pointed to was legalizing marijuana, which Reid supported but Bernier did not, and then there is the issue of the position that Bernier has taken on diversity.

“Max’s recent Tweets about the dangers of too much diversity are antithetical to the values of classic libertarianism. The state has no legitimate interest in how much diversity there is (and anyway, how on earth do you measure something as subjective as “diversity” anyway),” Reid wrote in his blog.

“We don’t—or shouldn’t—care what percentage of the population is this race or that race, or is this religion vs. that religion. In a country with a sufficiently strong political culture, our underlying values of openness and of allegiance to freedom and the rule of law will be so attractive that we’ll be able to inculcate these values in any number of citizens, whether they come from a half-dozen different backgrounds, or ten thousand, and regardless of the compass-point to which they bow when they pray,” he added.

The Liberal and NDP riding associations in Lanark-Frontenac-Kingston have not yet selected candidates for the 2019 federal election, which is still 9 months away. The NDP candidate in 2015 was John Fenik, who was then, and still is, the Mayor of the Town of Perth. The Liberal candidate was Phillippe Archambault, who ran unsuccessfully for Mayor of South Frontenac in 2018.

Wednesday, 16 January 2019 12:30

Christmas bird count in Frontenac Park

The Frontenac Park Christmas Bird Count took place on an unseasonably warm day on December 15th. There were a record 59 participants out enjoying the weather this year, 53 field surveyors and 6 bird feeder watchers hiked 85 kilometres of laneway/trail and drove 385 kilometres of road.

Despite many surveyors describing this as a slow year, the 2018 count tallied 3,346 individual birds from 49 different species – almost three hundred more birds than the previous record (3,053 birds) in 2017. And although the total number of species was unchanged from last year, the group added seven new species on count day plus one new species on count week to the Frontenac Circle list.

The new species included: merlin, peregrin falcon, evening grosbeak, field sparrow, hoary redpoll, pine grosbeak, and redhead. The commonly sighted species were blXK capped chickadee (550) closely followed by Canada geese (538). Among other plentiful birds were European starlings (245) blue jays (240) wild turkeys (172) rock pigeons (151) and morning doves (147).

The 2019 Christmas Bird Count is set for December 14th.

Wednesday, 09 January 2019 12:16

GREC’s Great Canoe Journey

On Friday, December 14, GREC’s Indigenous Studies class welcomed Christine Craig to their classroom to present a workshop as part of their participation in the Great Canoe Journey.

Ms. Craig took the students through a presentation in which she shared the knowledge she was given by Elders and knowledge keepers during a visit to British Columbia. The teachings centred around the Indigenous World View, particularly with respect to water. It stressed the importance of water conservation and preservation, and the challenges to these brought about by agriculture and industry.

Part of the Great Canoe Journey’s program, as well as education, is a challenge to students to do something to promote water conservation and preservation. GREC’s Indigenous Studies class chose to connect the Voyageur culture and Metis Dot Art teachings they received from Candace Lloyd with the Great Canoe Journey, by dot-painting canoe paddles.

The class had already started their paddle painting prior to the workshop, and were proud to show Ms. Craig their work. Ms. Craig was impressed with the quality of the work, and said she had visited many classes, but this was the first one to do this kind of project for The Great Canoe Journey.

For more information on the Great Canoe Journey, visit:

https://waterlution.org/great-canoe-journey/

Rural Frontenac Community Services has been awarded $952.83 from Blue Skies in the Community to continue the Frontenac Skies bucket drumming ensemble. With the Blue Skies funding new percussion instruments were purchased for the group.

Frontenac Skies is a percussion ensemble that features children and youth using bucket drums to create sound, rhythm and songs. This project continues to address the need for free, fun musical activities in the area that encourage rural youth to learn an instrument, be active and connect with a group in their own community in a fun environment that promotes inclusion.

Children and youth interested in joining the ensemble, join Lily at the Child Centre (1004 Art Duffy Rd., Sharbot Lake) on Wednesdays from 3:00-4:00 pm.

Upcoming: Join Lily and the Frontenac Skies on Sunday, February 10, 2019 during the Heritage Festival to try out the new percussion instruments and listen to the ensemble. The Child Centre will be open from 11:00 am to 3:00 pm with lots of activities for families to enjoy, including snow shoeing.  

Wednesday, 09 January 2019 12:15

More Christmas Drawings

We couldn’t quite let the season go without including a few more drawings. These ones were done by students at Land O’Lakes Public School in Mountain Grove (LOLPS) and Clarendon Central Public School (CCPS) in Plevna.


Karly Brown grade 1 CCPS

Karley Brown, grade 1, CCPS


Emily grade 3 LOLPS

Emily, grade 3 LOLPS


Abby Brown grade 3 CCPS

Abby Brown, grade 3, CCPS


Paige grade 4 LOLPS

Paige, grade 4, LOLPS


And while we are on the subject of Christmas, we published an article on Armenian Christmas traditions, including a recipe for Anoush Abour, Armenian Christmas Pudding.

Over the holidays I made Anoush Abour for the first time, and can now report that it is a delicious, not too sweet, dessert. Skinless Wheat Berries (also know as Pearled Wheat), the main ingredient, are available mostly in Middle Eastern Grocery stores but pealed barley can be used in the recipe if necessary. While making the Anoush Abour I came across some information that did not get in the original article.

It turns out that Anoush Abour goes way back, to old testament times.

The story goes that Noah and his family and all the animals he crammed into the Ark were running out of food while it continued to rain for 40 days and 40 nights. So Noah began boiling a big pot of water and asked everyone to bring them what was left. In went wheat and dried fruit and whatever else his family could find, as the giraffes and elephants looked on. As he was cooking the mixture, the rain stopped and Noah and his posse came to miraculously land on the "mountains of Ararat," according to the Book of Genesis. Mount Ararat is located just outside of Yerevan, the capital City of Armenia.

Wednesday, 09 January 2019 12:15

Frontenac Heritage Festival

Feb. 15 – 17, 2019

This year marks the 13th year of the Frontenac Heritage Festival in Central Frontenac. The Festival Committee has been busy the past few months putting together a line-up of events that have something to please everyone and help us to enjoy our great Canadian winter.

The Official Opening takes place at the Sharbot Lake Legion on Friday, Feb. 15 with a baked chicken dinner. Saturday starts with the popular Lions Club breakfast at OSO hall, then spend the rest of the day in Arden at the Community Centre with Empty Bowls, Historical Society, Wood Carving and games outside. The Kennebec Lake Association will sponsor activities on the lake near the bridge. Enjoy the music of Shawn McCullough and Wade Foster at the Sharbot Lake Country Inn on Saturday evening.

Sunday events include the Polar Plunge in Sharbot Lake followed by a chili lunch at the Legion. The Child Centre will sponsor a children’s day of games and food at the Centre while Bob and Mike serve up free pioneer food at the Railway Heritage Park. New this year, Bill MacDonald will be demonstrating logging techniques in a hands-on display, sure to be of interest to young and old. A new game called Crokicurl that combines crokinole and curling will be held at the Sharbot Lake ball field. Come on out and try this new and exciting game.

Also, on Sunday the Matson Family will offer a display of old time logging in Arden. This was a very popular event last year, one you’ll want to see.

Again, Bob and Mike will be holding an overnight winter camp in the Sharbot Lake area, to be held when weather is good, but space is limited so contact Mike at 613-279-2572 ASAP if you are interested. Look for Frontenac Heritage Festival on Facebook.

On January 19, 2019, Bob Richardson Branch #496 of the Royal Canadian Legion will celebrate the 70th Anniversary of its founding Charter.

The Branch is named after Private Robert Miles Richardson, a Sydenham resident born in 1874, and who joined the Canadian infantry in January 1916, making him 41 years of age at time of enlistment. Having served at both Vimy Ridge and Passchendaele with the 4th Canadian Mounted Rifles, he was wounded in December 1917, and was repatriated to Canada where he lived until his death in May 1949.

While the Branch, which is located on Amelia Street in Sydenham, was granted its official Charter on January 14, 1949, the inaugural organization meeting took place in the basement of St. Paul’s Church in October of 1948, and the name change to the Bob Richardson Branch did not occur until December, 1960, the same year that the Sydenham Cenotaph was dedicated.

The current Hall was purchased in 1965, but was not officially opened until 1972; prior to that, the Branch met on the top floor of the local blacksmith shop, also located on Amelia Street.

The 70th Anniversary Celebration will take place on January 19, 2019 at 1130am in the main hall at 4361 Amelia Street, Sydenham. The event will include special presentations and awards to members and supporters of the Branch, as well as a luncheon prepared by the Ladies Auxiliary. The event is open to all Branch members, families, friends, and well-wishers. To assist with the cost of the luncheon tickets may be purchased at the Branch at a price of $10.00 per person. Please telephone (613) 376-6808 for further information, if needed.

We will Remember them…

 

Wednesday, 19 December 2018 12:47

Townships weigh the pros and cons of pot sales

Both North and South Frontenac gave cannabis fans in their municipalities a green Christmas present at their final meetings of the year, deciding to permit private cannabis retailers access to their market, subject to the restrictions that are set out by the government of Ontario. But the chances of a pot store opening up within the next six months within either township are remote, as the government has limited the number of private stores in the entire province to 25 when stores will be allowed to open up on April 1st, only 5 of which will be located in Eastern Ontario.

The problem is one of supply, and once that is sorted out the government has indicated they will let the market determine how many stores are viable in Ontario.

Both townships received staff reports that outlined the pros and cons of permitting private stores in their jurisdictions before debating the issue at a council meeting.

Claire Dodds, the Director of Planning Services for South Frontenac, summed up the benefits of cannabis sales in her report: “It is broadly recognized that the legalization of recreational cannabis creates a new sector in the economy. While projections of users and sales vary, it is anticipated that the market will be sizeable. It is also expected that the market will grow over time as Canadians begin to participate as legal consumers.

“Opting out of permitting retail sales in the Township would mean that the only legal sources of purchase will be online or through retail outlets in neighbouring municipalities. If retail stores are not permitted in South Frontenac, any associated jobs related to retail stores will occur in neighbouring municipalities.”

The Province has stipulated a 150 metre buffer around schools in any municipality that opts-in to retailing, and has also said that there can be no further restrictions on locations other than commercial zoning.

North Frontenac opts in by Craig Bakay

North Frontenac Council voted 7-1 to opt in with retail cannabis outlets at a special meeting last Friday in Plevna. The lone nay vote came from Coun. Vernon Hermer.

Although he didn’t get a vote, Lanark-Frontenac-Kingston MPP Randy Hillier, who came to Council on another matter (his letter questioning the role of conservation authorities), stuck around to see how the cannabis question resolved.

“I was glad to be here so they could hash it out,” Hillier said.

As it turned out, Council engaged Hillier right off the bat while it ‘hashed out’ the question asking him about the provincial government’s recent decision to limit the number of store licences to 25 in the initial round.

“That’s only the first round,” Hillier said. “It’s because of supply.

“It’s not a cap we’re imposing.”

“I’m aware a lot of people grow it and use it,” said Coun. John Inglis. “Our benefit initially is $5,000 (a government grant when a municipality opts in).”

“Sounds like a bribe,” said Hermer.

“It’s legal now, so if somebody wants to have a business, that’s OK with me,” said new Coun. Fred Fowler.

“It would be a great summertime business,” said Coun. Wayne Good. “Maybe we should open one here in the office.”

“It’s going to be available anyway,” said Mayor Ron Higgins, not necessarily referencing, Good’s comment.

“I think we made the right decision to let municipalities decide if they want to opt in or out,” said Hillier. “I think there will be a benefit by reducing revenue for criminal activities.

“I can see there being lower policing costs from less criminal activity.”

Clerk Tara Mieske pointed out that a retail store cannot be a home-based business.

“So I can’t run it out of my basement?” said Coun. Gerry Martin.

Cannabis Debate: South Frontenac by Wilma Kenny

In bringing the staff report on cannabis to Council, Claire Dodds, Director of Development Services, said there have been some further changes in the provincial regulations since her report was circulated to Council last Thursday. Not more than 25 retail outlets will be phased in ‘at any time’, of which a maximum of five (of the first 25) will be allocated to the Eastern Region of the Province (ie from Lindsay to Quebec). Most of these will be directed to municipalities of 50,000 or more. “Therefore, if we (South Frontenac) opt in, it’s unlikely we will have an outlet here (in the near future), but it keeps us in the conversation.”

Councillor Sutherland proposed that a motion to opt in be amended to stipulate that any outlet should be located in the LCBO stores, “so we would know where they are.” Councillor Barr said that the Province has already decided that cannabis outlets would not go into LCBO stores. Dodds said the Province has given the municipalities only one choice: to opt in or out, with no additional criteria. No one supported Sutherland’s proposed amendment.

Councillor Revill said he was reluctant to opt in, for he was not in favour of enhancing the use of cannabis, but he recognized the danger of encouraging the black market, and respects those who need cannabis as a medication.

The motion brought to Council was to opt in, and to direct staff to develop a policy statement for Council’s approval, which would assist staff with providing comments to the AGCO (Alcohol and Gaming Corporation of Ontario) in line with the municipal public interest on proposals for cannabis retail stores in South Frontenac. This passed in a non-recorded vote, with Councillors Sleeth and Roberts opposed.

Wednesday, 19 December 2018 12:46

GREC’s Great Canoe Journey

On Friday, December 14, GREC’s Indigenous Studies class welcomed Christine Craig to their classroom to present a workshop as part of their participation in the Great Canoe Journey.

Ms. Craig took the students through a presentation in which she shared the knowledge she was given by Elders and knowledge keepers during a visit to British Columbia. The teachings centred around the Indigenous World View, particularly with respect to water. It stressed the importance of water conservation and preservation, and the challenges to these brought about by agriculture and industry.

Part of the Great Canoe Journey’s program, as well as education, is a challenge to students to do something to promote water conservation and preservation. GREC’s Indigenous Studies class chose to connect the Voyageur culture and Metis Dot Art teachings they received from Candace Lloyd with the Great Canoe Journey, by dot-painting canoe paddles.

The class had already started their paddle painting prior to the workshop, and were proud to show Ms. Craig their work. Ms. Craig was impressed with the quality of the work, and said she had visited many classes, but this was the first one to do this kind of project for The Great Canoe Journey.

For more information on the Great Canoe Journey, visit: waterlution.org/great-canoe-journey/

For a lot of people Christmas Day and Christmas dinner is all about family, but for some family is made up of more than blood relatives. Local communities become families over time, and it this spirit that makes Community Christmas Dinners happen. In our region, there are three Christmas Dinners that have been around for a number of years, in Northbrook, Sharbot Lake, and Verona. They are all different, but they serve a pretty similar menu, they are all free dinners that are community funded, and they are all open to anyone and everyone in the local community.

“Some people come because they are alone, some come to spend part of Christmas with friends and neighbours, and some couple come because it is a log of work to make Christmas dinner for only two people,” said Marylin Bolender, who has been the principal organiser of the Northbrook dinner for a number of years, a job she inherited from others who started it up as much as 20 years ago. She puts up the posters and cooks the turkeys, hams and pies the day before, and volunteers show up at the Lion’s hall on Christmas Day to help with all the final cooking, setup and cleanup.

“People always see to donate enough money to pay for the following year,” she said, “and since the Lion’s Club donates the hall, we keep the costs down.”

Bolender said she never knows how many people will come, as few as 50 and as many as 100. Last year there were 80, and the crews will be ready for that many or more this year.

“I enjoy it, and people enjoy coming out and sharing,” she said. The Northbrook Dinner starts at 12noon.

In Sharbot Lake, a committee meets throughout the fall to get everything organised for the dinner, which runs from 2pm-4pm at St. James Catholic Church Hall. The dinner is often followed by music and a lot of socialising.

In Verona, the Lions and the Verona Community Association combine forces to put on what they call a Community Feast, with lots of music and presents, starting up at 10am, and running well into the afternoon.

For further information about these dinners, look to Northern Happenings on page 26. Contact for the Northrbook dinner is Marylin at 613-336-1573, for Sharbot Lake it is Pastor Mark Hudson at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.,and for Verona it is Joyce Casement at 613-374-3406

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