Wednesday, 28 November 2018 11:15

Healthy Living with Prediabetes

November is Diabetes Awareness Month.  To raise awareness of diabetes and to provide information on best management, the Sharbot Family Health Team Diabetes Education Team (Cathy Fox, Certified Diabetes Educator, Registered Nurse and Saman Shaikh, Certified Diabetes Educator, Registered Dietitian) at Sharbot Lake Family Health Team will be contributing weekly articles during the month of November.

Wouldn’t it be nice if your body had an “early warning system” to let you know when something was not right? Prediabetes is just that: an indication that your blood glucose (sugar) is higher than normal, but not yet high enough to be within the range of diabetes. Sometimes referred to as “borderline diabetes”, a diagnosis of prediabetes is a chance to change the future. Chances of a type 2 diabetes diagnosis increase if you have prediabetes, but not everyone with prediabetes will develop diabetes.

There are several risk factors that may lead to type 2 diabetes and being aware of these can be helpful in keeping on top of your health. People over 40 years of age are at higher risk of diabetes. A family history or genetic predisposition to diabetes can also be a major factor, along with being a member of a high-risk population such as Asian, African, Indigenous, Hispanic, or South Asian populations. Other risk factors include having high blood pressure or high cholesterol, being overweight (especially around your tummy), having sleep apnea, or taking medications such as glucocorticoids that may raise blood glucose. Women who have been diagnosed with polycystic ovary syndrome, or who may have had gestational diabetes during pregnancy, are also more likely to develop type 2 diabetes.

The good news is that research has shown if you take steps to manage your blood sugars when you have prediabetes, you can prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes. The treatment of prediabetes is usually based on making healthy changes in your lifestyle, though some medical professionals may prescribe medication to further reduce your chances of developing diabetes. If you are overweight, losing weight in healthy, sustainable way can also make a significant different in your health and quality of life.

A healthy, balanced diet that includes moderation of all foods, regular meals and snacks, and plenty of fruits and vegetables is beneficial. A healthy diet also includes minimally processed foods, whole grains, and little or no added sugar. Keeping well hydrated by drinking water and limiting sugary drinks such as pop and fruit juice is also important. As well, physical activity is necessary for a healthy lifestyle. Diabetes Canada recommends 150 minutes of moderate-vigorous aerobic activity each week (e.g. brisk walking, biking, jogging etc., for 30 minutes a day). If you are not used to such physical activity, you may have to start slowly and increase your activity level gradually.

If you have prediabetes, keeping on top of it can be paramount to preventing or delaying diabetes. People who have been diagnosed with prediabetes should have blood work done at least once a year to make sure your blood glucose level is not creeping up. If you would like to learn more about healthy eating and active living, or just need some support with setting goals and getting motivated, the Diabetes Education Program at the Sharbot Lake Family Health Team can help.

Please call the Sharbot Lake Family Health Team at 613-279-2100 to book an appointment to discuss your diabetes.  Our Certified Diabetes Educators are here to help you learn how to best manage your diabetes or pre-diabetes.  

A Registered Dietitian is available by appointment for patients of the Sydenham and Verona Medical Clinics on alternate Wednesdays.  Patients of the Sydenham Medical Clinic can call 613-376-3327 to schedule an appointment.  If you are a patient of the Verona Medical Clinic, please call 613-374-2077.

Monthly diabetes education group sessions are held at the Verona Medical Clinic.  A Registered Dietitian and a Nurse Practitioner are available to discuss a range of topics related to living with diabetes and pre-diabetes.  Everyone is welcome to attend.  The next season is Thursday November 22nd, from 9 a.m. to noon."

Published in CENTRAL FRONTENAC
Wednesday, 14 November 2018 10:53

Getting the Most from Your Diabetes Visit

(November is Diabetes Awareness Month and November 14 is World Diabetes Day. To raise awareness of diabetes and to provide information on best management, the Sharbot Family Health Team Diabetes Education Team (Cathy Fox, Certified Diabetes Educator, Registered Nurse and Saman Shaikh, Certified Diabetes Educator, Registered Dietitian) will be contributing weekly articles during the month of November.)

Did you know that a little preparation before your diabetes visit will help you get the most out of the appointment? According the Diabetes Canada, preparation for your diabetes-focused visit ensures you are prepared and know what to expect. Diabetes Canada and your Certified Diabetes educator have a few suggestions that will help you get the most out of your visit.

Try to have your blood work done before the appointment. This helps the doctor and the Certified Diabetes Educator (CDE) focus on the next steps in the organization of your diabetes care- including medication addition or change in dose.

Bring along your blood sugar log book or the actual meter. Your CDE likes to review your numbers to see if there are any adjustments that can be made.

You can also bring along your updated list of medications to ensure the medical records are the same.

Identify your goals. What do you want to get out of this visit? What are you trying to achieve? You most likely have good diabetes management at the top of the list, but there may be other topics you want to discuss, such as weight loss, becoming more active, learning to cook healthy meals or even becoming more involved with your community.

Bringing a list of written questions to your visit ensures all your concerns are addressed. Your concerns are important! Bring along a family member or friend for support. Sometimes two sets of ears are better then one! Maybe the family member or friend can take brief notes for you to review after the visit is over.

And finally, to achieve the most from your diabetes appointment, be honest with yourself and the CDE. We are here to help, not pass judgement. Discuss any possible barriers in your life, such as limited finances, or fears about diabetes. Your CDE can work with you to find a solution that is beneficial to you. Over time, the small changes that you have incorporated into your lifestyle will lead to sustainable diabetes control.

Remember, diabetes management is a lifelong process with ups and downs. A good working relationship with your CDE will help you in your journey through this process to achieve your goals.

The Sharbot Lake Family Health Team has hosted a Diabetes Education Program since 2006. Two on site full time Certified Diabetes Educators work closely with the other health care professionals to provide care to approximately 500 patients with diabetes or prediabetes in the community.

(Cathy Fox, Registered Nurse and Saman Shaikh, Registered Dietitian are both Certified Diabetes Educators and can help you learn how to best manage your diabetes or pre-diabetes. Please call the Sharbot Lake Family Health Team at 613-279-2100 to book an appointment to discuss your diabetes.)

Published in CENTRAL FRONTENAC
Wednesday, 07 November 2018 11:15

Educators play role in managing Diabetes

November is Diabetes Awareness Month and November 14 is World Diabetes Day. To raise awareness of diabetes and to provide information on best management, the Sharbot Family Health Team Diabetes Education Team (Cathy Fox, Certified Diabetes Educator, Registered Nurse and Saman Shaikh, Certified Diabetes Educator, Registered Dietitian) will be contributing weekly articles during the month of November

You’ve Been Diagnosed with Diabetes. Now What?

Managing diabetes care can seem like a complicated balancing act. Meeting with a Certified Diabetes Educator is a great way to get support and guidance and one of the first things a patient should do when faced with a new diabetes diagnosis.

What is a Certified Diabetes Educator?

A Certified Diabetes Educator is a licensed health care professional, who specializes in helping people with diabetes learn how to manage their condition. Diabetes Educators have passed a national exam that certifies them with the Canadian Diabetes Educator Certification Board. Re-certification is done every 5 years to maintain the status of “Certified” Diabetes Educator

What does a Certified Diabetes Educator do?

Certified Diabetes Educators (CDE) assist people with self-management of their diabetes by offering evidence-based guidance to diabetes care. The CDE is a member of your health care team and works closely with the physician or nurse practitioner using the 2018 Diabetes Canada Guidelines to follow you in such areas as monitoring of blood glucose, medications, risk reduction of complications, monitoring of blood pressure, weight, waist circumference, feet, eyes and exercise. A Diabetes Educator helps makes managing your diabetes easier, working with you to develop a plan to stay healthy, and giving you tools and ongoing support to make that plan a regular part of your life.

The CDE can also provide specific tracking tools to help you monitor your diabetes. In your diabetes visit, the CDE will discuss your needs and goals and answer any questions you may have.

Certified Diabetes Educators can:

Empower and assist patients to make positive changes in lifestyle and self-care behaviors

Educate patients and caregivers in using diabetes devices, such as blood glucose meters, insulin pens and pumps, and continuous glucose monitors

Teach problem-solving strategies and skills to help people with diabetes live healthy, active lifestyles

Provide nutrition education that is individualized for each person and supports people with diabetes to adopt a healthy diet

Work with physicians and other members of your health care team to help manage medication regimens

Help you develop emotional coping skills

The Sharbot Lake Family Health Team has hosted a Diabetes Education Program since 2006. Two on site full time Certified Diabetes Educators work closely with the other health care professionals to provide care to approximately 500 patients with diabetes or prediabetes in the community.

Cathy Fox, Registered Nurse and Saman Shaikh, Registered Dietitian are both Certified Diabetes Educators and can help you learn how to best manage your diabetes or pre-diabetes. Please call the Sharbot Lake Family Health Team at 613-279-2100 to book an appointment to discuss your diabetes.

Published in CENTRAL FRONTENAC
Thursday, 01 November 2018 11:30

Diabetes awareness month

November is Diabetes Awareness Month and November 14 is World Diabetes Day. To raise awareness of diabetes and share information on best management, the Sharbot Family Health Team Diabetic Education Team (Cathy Fox, Certified Diabetes Educator, Registered Nurse and Saman Shaikh, Certified Diabetes Educator, Registered Dietitian) will be contributing weekly articles during the month of November

Currently diabetes is reaching epidemic proportions as one in three Canadians is living with diabetes or prediabetes and an estimated 1.5 million are living with undiagnosed diabetes.

There isn’t a cure yet for diabetes but maintaining a healthy lifestyle can reduce its impact on your life. What you do every day makes a difference: eating healthily, staying physically active, taking medicines if prescribed, and keeping health care appointments to stay on track.

There are three main types of diabetes: type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes (diabetes while pregnant).

With type 1 diabetes, your body can’t make insulin (a hormone that acts like a key to let blood sugar into cells for use as energy), so you need to take it every day. Type 1 diabetes is less common than type 2 diabetes; 5% of the people who have diabetes have type 1. Currently, no one knows how to prevent type 1 diabetes.

Most people with diabetes—9 out of 10—have type 2 diabetes. With type 2 diabetes, your body doesn’t use insulin well and is unable to keep blood sugar at normal levels. If you have any of the risk factors below, ask your doctor if you should be tested for diabetes. The sooner you find out, the sooner you can start making healthy changes that will benefit you now and in the future.

Type 2 diabetes risk factors include:

Having prediabetes (blood sugar levels that are higher than normal but not high enough to be diagnosed as diabetes).

Being overweight.

Being 45 years or older.

Having a parent, brother, or sister with type 2 diabetes.

Being physically active less than 3 times a week.

Ever having gestational diabetes or giving birth to a baby who weighed more than 9 pounds.

 

The Canadian Diabetic Association encourages everyone to visit www. Diabetestest.ca to take the online CANRISK test and learn their risk level for developing type 2 diabetes.

 

 

You’ve been diagnosed with diabetes or prediabetes. Now what?

Managing diabetes or prediabetes is a balancing act—food, activity, medicine, and blood sugar levels—but you can do it. Meeting with a certified diabetes educator is a great way to get support and guidance, including how to:

Follow a healthy eating plan.

Get physically active.

Test your blood sugar.

Give yourself insulin by syringe, pen, or pump, if needed.

Monitor your feet, skin and eyes to catch problems early.

Get diabetes supplies and store them according to package directions.

Manage stress and deal with daily diabetes care.

 

What is a Certified Diabetes Educator?

 

Certified Diabetes Educators play a significant role in managing Diabetes. A Certified Diabetes Educator (CDE) is a licensed health care professional, such as a nurse, dietitian or pharmacist, who specializes in helping people with diabetes learn how to manage their condition. The counselling and support that CDEs provide is known as diabetes education or diabetes self-management. To certify, the diabetes educator must pass a national exam that certifies them with the Canadian Diabetes Educator Certification Board. Re-certification is done every 5 years to maintain the status of “Certified” Diabetes Educator (CDE).

CDEs assist people with diabetes or prediabetes with self-management by offering evidence-based guidance to diabetes care. CDEs collaborate with the physician or nurse practitioner using the 2018 Diabetes Canada Guidelines to follow you in such areas as monitoring of blood glucose, medications, reducing risk of complications, monitoring of blood pressure, weight, waist circumference, feet, eyes and exercise. In your diabetes visit, the CDE will discuss your needs and goals, provide tracking tools to help you monitor your diabetes and answer any questions you may have.

Ask your health care provider about diabetes self-management education and support and to recommend a diabetes educator.

The Sharbot Lake Family Health Team has a Diabetic Team that includes 2 Certified Diabetes Educators (CDEs) who work closely with the rest of the Sharbot Lake Family Health Team health care providers to help you achieve the best health possible. Please call the clinic at 613-279-2100 for more information.

Published in CENTRAL FRONTENAC
Wednesday, 24 October 2018 11:24

New services for people with vision loss

Low vision can significantly impact a person’s everyday activities. Vision loss is defined as loss of sight that can’t be corrected by medicine, surgery, or standard eyeglasses. Vision loss can affect a person’s overall health, independence, and community participation.

To boost the safety, independence and quality of life of individuals with vision loss is the aim of vision rehabilitation. In our region, the South East Ontario Vision Rehabilitation Service (SOVRS) is funded by the Ministry of Health to provide vision rehabilitation to people of all ages. SOVRS brings together healthcare providers and certified specialists from Kingston Health Sciences Centre and Vision Loss Rehabilitation Ontario. The SOVRS team works with people with vision loss to meet their individual needs and goals.

“Using Technology to Assist with Low Vision” is one thing that many people add to their vision rehabilitation plan. That is why SOVRS is offering a free, two-part workshop of this title at Connections Adult Learning’s site in Sharbot Lake. The dates are November 7 and November 21, 2018 from 1:00 to 3:00pm.

“Technology can really level the playing field for people with vision loss,” says Scott Birney, one of the workshop presenters. Scott sees the benefits of technology almost daily in his role as an Independent Living Skills Specialist on the SOVRS team. “There are so many devices and programs that have been specifically designed to help people with vision loss overcome day to day obstacles and assist with staying informed.”

Julia Foster, another presenter and an Occupational Therapist on the SOVRS team says, “So many beneficial features are actually built-in to most computers, smartphones, and tablets. Many of these devices can also be adapted to make it easier for the user to understand and control. Features like speech to text, onscreen keyboards, reading mode and magnification can make it easier for people with different types of disabilities.”

Those with vision loss who have learned to use technology have discovered possibilities they didn’t realize existed. For some, the benefits may be as basic as using a device for reading, playing games and connecting with loved ones. For others, it may be using technology to manage a schedule, do their banking, keep track of contacts, identify items in the store, take online courses, write their memoirs, or make their work demands more manageable.

In an article for the Kingston Health Sciences Centre, retired teacher and past participant, Catherine Whittaker, talked about the “life-altering” impact of vision rehabilitation and technology. “I don’t use that word lightly,” she says, “but after learning how to use an iPad to access online books, library services and more, I felt like I had finally entered the 21st century. I can get news and commentary, which means I can be a political person again and make thoughtful choices. I didn’t want to be sidelined by low vision. I wanted to keep learning, be independent and engaged in life. I have all that now, and I have hope.”

These workshops aim to provide a starting point for learning. No experience is necessary and Connections will have equipment to explore if participants don’t have their own. There will be options to receive follow-up one-on-one training from specialists from the SOVRS team or with Connections’ Computer Instructors.

While the workshops focus mainly on technology, individuals with vision loss can also access other training and services that support them in building skills to remain independent at home and to navigate within the community. Through a partnership with the Sharbot Lake Family Health Team (SLFHT), Anne Chiarelli, Certified Low Vision Specialist with SOVRS, will be at the the SLFHT one day a month for a low vision clinic. The next clinic is tentatively planned for November 2, 2018, but you will need to be referred to SOVRS ahead of time for an appointment. After gathering information on each person’s vision loss, and how they can best use their remaining vision, the broader SOVRS team works with each person to look at what type of techniques, equipment, or other adaptations might be best suited to that individual.

For referral to the SOVRS vision rehabilitation program, you can talk to your eye doctor, or your healthcare professional at the Sharbot Lake Family Health Team about sending in a referral form. You can also start the referral process yourself by calling 613-542-4975 extension 5081. Referral forms can be obtained from the number above or the Queen’s Ophthalmology website: https://ophthalmology.queensu.ca/clinic/SOVRS.

For more information about the “Using Technology to Assist with Low Vision” two-part workshop, see the flyer insert in this paper. To register, please contact Connections Adult Learning at 613-279-2499 or drop in to their site at 24719 Hwy. 7 in Sharbot Lake.

Published in CENTRAL FRONTENAC
Wednesday, 21 September 2016 15:50

Seniors’ Fitness and Lifestyle Program

The Seniors’ Fitness and Lifestyle Program will be starting up on Monday September 26 at the Sharbot Lake Medical Centre in the Community Room. This free program consists of aerobic and strengthening exercises instructed by a Canadian Centre for Activity and Aging certified seniors’ fitness instructor, monthly healthy lifestyle education sessions, seasonal social activities, and more! There will two moderate-vigorous level classes held twice per week from 9am-10am and 10:15am-11:15am on Mondays and Thursdays. There will also be a gentle chair-based class held once per week from 11:30am-12:15pm on Thursdays. For more information or to register please call 613-279-2100.

Published in CENTRAL FRONTENAC
Wednesday, 17 August 2016 23:13

Diabetes Cooking Class

Are you sometimes confused about what healthy eating looks like when you have diabetes? Have you ever been told to avoid certain foods or entire food groups in order to control your blood sugar levels? Sharbot Lake Family Health Team Dietitians are here to help clear up all the confusion!

Starting Tuesday September 6 from 1:30-4:30pm the dietitians will be offering Diabetes Friendly Cooking Classes every Tuesday for 5 weeks. Topics covered will include: The importance of including healthy carbohydrates, high fibre choices, heart healthy eating, lower sugar eating, and how to read a nutrition label. Each session will also include cooking a healthy recipe and group discussion. Classes are open to anyone diagnosed with Prediabetes or Diabetes as well as anyone caring for someone with Diabetes. Call Megan at 613-279-2100 ext. 107 for more information or to register.  

Published in CENTRAL FRONTENAC

It's been two months since Brenda Bonner retired after working for eight years as a Nurse Practitioner (NP) at the Sharbot Lake Family Health Team.

At 64, she was feeling that it was time to take a step back from full time work in a clinic. She saw patients at the clinic four days a week, often working through lunch and into the early evening, and she did a lot of paperwork at home.

“All in all it was a full time commitment,” she said this week from her home in Perth. Her work as a nurse practitioner, which came after a long career as a registered nurse, was some of the most rewarding in her career, and after taking a step back for a few weeks she has thought about her own future, about the future for nurse practitioners in general, and about their role in a reformed healthcare system in Ontario.

For her own part, Bonner has been considering a number of options.

“I would like to keep working, but with more balance in my life, more time for family,” she said.

She is considering taking on patients for house calls.

“For various reasons, including transportation issues, there are patients who require care in their own homes, so I might do some of that work. It is not covered by OHIP, but some supplemental health insurance policies will cover it,” she said.

She might be doing relief work in a community health centre in the vicinity of her home in Perth, and also some in-service education to health care organisations, to promote and maintain health knowledge and skills.

“I didn't have any of these ideas when I left Sharbot Lake, but over the last couple of months I have been considering how I can continue to work on my own terms by setting these things up. It is different for me since my whole career has basically been as an employee at only two jobs, as an RN in one location for 30 years and as an NP for eight years in Sharbot Lake. It's a change to be setting up a business of my own at this time,” she said.

Bonner has also spent time, before and after she left the Sharbot Lake Family Health Team, considering potential changes in the role that nurse practitioners play in the heath care system.

She supports some of the initiatives that are being promoted by the Nurse Practitioners Association of Ontario (NPAO).

“When the NPAO made submissions to the Ministry of Finance for the upcoming Ontario budget, they highlighted a few items that would make a difference for NPs and save money for the system as well,” she said.

One item that was featured in the submission is to deal with the pay and benefits gap between NPs who work in hospitals and those who work in primary care clinics.

“Salaries have been frozen since 2006 in clinics, which has led to a $30,000 pay gap, plus, NPs who work in hospitals enjoy the pension and benefits plans in the hospitals. This means that when positions in hospitals come open, NPs leave clinics, often rural clinics, for those jobs,” said Bonner.

The NPAO also supports the “right care in the right time in the right place, by the right provider”, an initiative of the ministry that intends to redirect healthcare dollars so they start to follow the patients and not the providers.

Bonner cited a case that illustrates how this is not happening currently. Public health units that were running sexual health clinics led by nurse practitioners have been switching to contracted clinics run by doctors. This has been done for financial reasons. The health units pay the NPs out of their own budgets, whereas the doctors can bill OHIP directly for the service. This is a financial benefit for the cash-strapped health units, but since the doctors’ billings are higher than the cost of clinics led by the nurse practitioners, ultimately there is a greater cost to the healthcare system as a whole and the ratepayers who fund it.

Finally, the NPAO is supportive of an initiative to locate NPs on a full time basis in long-term care facilities.

“Acuity level is increasing in long-term care facilities. Seniors are staying at home longer, and they are older and sicker when they go into long-term care. Nurse Practitioners on staff save doctor visits and visits to emergency units at hospitals,” said Bonner.

Published in CENTRAL FRONTENAC
Thursday, 25 February 2016 07:41

Good Food Box - Sharbot Lake

Are you interested in having wholesale fruits and vegetables available in Sharbot Lake? Ordering in groups helps to decrease costs of fresh, healthy produce below regular store prices! If there’s enough community interest, Mike Dean’s and Sharbot Lake Family Health Team are ready to offer this deal to the community.

$10 small box includes approx. 10 items

$15 large box includes approx. 15 items

Although food prices fluctuate, the Good Food Box prices will stay the same each month and we will work to provide variety month to month.

Pay by the 1st Thursday of each month at the Sharbot Lake Family Health Team and pick it up on the 3rd Friday of each month between 2 and 4pm in the Sharbot Lake Family Health Team downstairs community room.

This program was offered several years ago and was quite popular; however, it was discontinued primarily due to lack of space for packing and storing the boxes. Our hope as a Family Health Team is that this can help make it easier for you and your family to eat healthy fruits and vegetables!

Need some motivation to start increasing your fruit and vegetable intake?

A diet rich in a variety of fruits and vegetables can lower the risk of heart disease and stroke. Individuals who eat more than five servings have about a 20% lower risk of coronary heart disease and stroke, compared with individuals who eat less than three servings per day.

Some types of fruits and vegetables may protect against certain cancers.

Increased consumption of leafy vegetables and whole fruits is associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes. High consumption of fruit juice however, is associated with a greater risk of type 2 diabetes.

Orders for March are due Thursday March 3, 2016. Please contact Megan Burns at 613-279-2100 ext. 107 for more information or to place an order.

Published in CENTRAL FRONTENAC
Wednesday, 17 February 2016 15:14

The Table teams up with the Family Health Team

The Table Community Food Centre in Perth has reached out to the Sharbot Lake Family Health Team as a partner in running their wellness program called FoodFit. 

FoodFit is a 12-week program for anyone who wants to take steps towards a healthier lifestyle through moderate exercise and healthy eating. The goal is to give people the tools they need to make choices that will improve their health. The program combines fun, hands-on cooking sessions and food-based activities with take-home recipes, shared meals and snacks, easy-to-understand nutrition information, group exercise and self-directed goal-setting. We will be making soups, sauces, and salad dressings from scratch as well as healthy snacks and recipes with new and interesting flavours

With the help of a nurse from the health centre, we will track blood pressure and other health indicators at the start and end of the program, and provide pedometers so participants can monitor daily steps. A dietitian at the health centre will be involved in teaching nutritional topics as well as available to answer any specific questions.

“I am excited about running this program because it doesn’t pretend that everyone is at the same stage, it gives people room to set their own goals based on where they are at in life,” says The Table’s Community Kitchen Coordinator, Rosie Kerr. She explains that the Foodfit model is designed to respect the limits of people’s individual circumstances, and encourage everyone to “take small steps, and make changes they can live with.”

This program will be free of charge and open to any age. Childcare will be provided upon request. The program will take place at the Sharbot Lake Family Health Team Mondays from 1-4pm starting March 7. Priority will be given to community members who self identify as living in a low-income household.

For more information or to register contact Rosie Kerr, the Community Kitchen Coordinator at the Table, 613-267-6428 ext. 6 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. . Please register as soon as possible (preferably by March 1) for this exciting new program so organizers can prepare.

Published in CENTRAL FRONTENAC
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