Wednesday, 28 February 2018 12:31

Foundation Grant to Look into Recreation Centre

Thanks to a grant from the Community Foundation For Kingston and Area, the group/township subcommittee working to turn the former Hinchinbrooke school into a recreation and cultural centre has been able to engage Social Focus Consulting to help do a business plan for township council.

The first step is a two part survey of community interest in such a centre and your ideas about what it should include plus a survey of groups and organizations that might use it and provide programs there. The survey should take about 5-10 minutes to complete.

For those who live and/or work within the Township, complete this survey: http://bit.ly/Hinchinbrooke1

For those who are senior decision makers within organizations that serve the Township, please complete this survey too: http://bit.ly/Hinchinbrooke2.

You may have already seen the surveys on Facebook or been given them at a meeting. In order to get more responses there is a new deadline of March 7th so the links to do the survey could be published here in the newspaper.

Your answers will be anonymous. If you need a paper copy you can get one printed for you at the township office, the Frontenac News or from the following group members:

  • Janet Anderson 613-375-9280
  • Bob Teal 613-375-6525
  • Sue Leslie 613-483-5695
Published in CENTRAL FRONTENAC

The 4th annual Telus Ride For Dad raised about $8,000 for the fight against prostrate cancer Saturday at the Snow Road Snowmobile.

Awhile back, organizer Brandon Crain heard about a motorcycle Ride For Dad on the radio.

“I don’t have any personal connection to the fight against prostrate cancer, I just thought it would be a good thing to do,” he said. “It’s just a good reason to get out and ride.”

“He sucked me into it,” said co-organizer Shelby Knight.

The ride itself ran from the clubhouse, up to Wilbur, across to Dalhousie Lake, around through McDonalds Corners and back to the clubhouse for lunch.

“We were going to go to Lanark but there just isn’t enough snow on that part of the trail for this many machines,” Crain said. “You need at least two feet of snow and it didn’t have it.”

The run didn’t just include snowmobiles.

Although they couldn’t go on the trail in the their enclosed, heated 4x4, Bob Olmstead and Janet Rhyndress still managed to participate.

“We’ll ride the roads,” Olmstead said. “We’ve managed to get about $2,300 in pledges.”

Even those who didn’t get pledges managed to participate through the Slap-Down-a-$20 campaign.

If you’d still like to contribute, you can do so by calling Crain at 613-277-0092.

Published in Lanark County

Hidden among the communications reports to South Frontenac Council this week was the quarterly report by one of the most active volunteers in the township, and likely one of the most active trail cyclists in the township, Robert Charest from the Perth Road area. Charest is a member of the township’s trail committee, and he reports on the upkeep of the trails to Council.

His interest in the trails started when he moved to the area in 2005, and finding that he lived right on the Cataraqui (Cat) Trail he took to trail cycling. Cycling, along with kayaking and skiing in the winter, has become a way of life for him. He uses the trails near his house often.

He has taken on responsibility for maintenance on some sections of the trail, including the picturesque section that’s runs northeast between Perth Road and Chaffey’s Locks just over the county line.

He spends some time each spring and autumn cutting up deadfall along the trail with a chain saw, He also takes the trail to go to Sydenham to buy groceries and rides regularly on the whole Frontenac County Trail system, including the new K&P sections.

In this month’s report he summarised some of his observations about the trail from the past year. The first point he made is that trail usage is up, both for cyclists and hikers, the busiest section being the Cat Trail section between Sydenham and Perth Road. He also made note of the improvement in the section that runs west from Harrowsmith to the Lennox and Addington County border, which was resurfaced using $17,500 in township funds.

“We have a nice trail surface from the Loughborough/Portland Boundary Road all the way to the Strathcona Paper Plant [near Napanee], a 30 kilometre stretch. The trail ends at the plant, and one of Charest’s wishes for 2018 is to see the trail extended another 12 or 13 kilometres into Napanee. On the other end of the trail, he would like to see a Cat Trail extension from Smiths Falls to Carleton Place, a 30 km stretch.

But along with those loftier goals he had some more specific recommendations that can be implemented more easily, and cheaply.

Those include, among others: new signage to mark the distance between hamlets of main roads; identifiable shirts for trail volunteers to make it easier for trail users to access information and assistance; picnic tables or benches and garbage cans at the parking lots on Road 38 and Perth Road; a large trail map in Sydenham, and resurfacing of a section of a small section of trail near Sydenham.

Finally, Charest thinks “South Frontenac should become an off-road cycling hub,” linking Kingston, Sharbot Lake, Napanee, and Carleton Place.

“Harrowsmith and Sydenham should ante up the offering of services and facilities to cater to all these cyclists,” he concluded.

Published in SOUTH FRONTENAC
Wednesday, 24 January 2018 10:55

Exciting times in the world of Eisstock

The KingSton and Area Ice Stock Club (KAISC) is sending 5 members of the club to be part of the Canadian Ice Stock Federation team that is competing at the World Championships in Austria (the gang leaves in late February).

Here are the members of the club who are going and what they are competing in.

Paul Blais: Canada's rep for "Individual Target Shooting". This is an event that challenges the Ice Stock player on their accuracy to hit targets and perform specific set shots etc. The player makes 24 shots and points are awarded based on how accurate the person is etc.

Tyler MacComish: Team Target Shooting: Tyler is one of four players for this team. It is exactly the same as above, except that each player performs a specific type of shot as part of the overall competition. Each person has 6 shots (4 x's 6 = 24) at the different elements of target shooting.

Mike Osborne / Kevin Bryan / Walter Schuster: Team Play. This is the typical 4 vs 4 team play tournament. Canada plays in the B Division for this.

Of the players going to the world championships, Tyler MacComish’s achievement is historic. Tyler was one of the first players to join the Club when it was founded. He has Down’s Syndrome, making this the first time an individual with special needs has qualified for this international event.

The team will also be participating in Skate the Lake in Portland for the third time next month. This year the idea is that Team Canada Men and Women will be playing against teams to help them prep for Austria. This will be occurring on Family Day weekend in Feb, and is also a good opportunity for the public to try the sport.

The Austrian Ambassador to Canada in Ottawa has been in contact with KAISC and plans are being worked out for an imminent trip to Rideau Hall to showcase the sport.

(information submitted by Karl Hammer)

Published in General Interest
Wednesday, 17 January 2018 11:15

Fire Chief Chesebrough Retires

When Council reconvened from a closed session for their regular meeting, CAO Orr announced that they had just accepted Fire Chief Rick Chesebrough’s resignation; after more than 14 years of service for the township, Chesebrough will be leaving at the end of this week.

Later, Orr said this did not come as a surprise; “It’s been in the works for some time now: he did the math, and realized he was eligible.”

On behalf of Council, Mayor Vandewal congratulated Chesebrough, wishing him “many years of health and happiness.”

Council then passed a motion to appoint Terry Gervais as acting fire chief.

Support for Seniors Active Living Centre
Following last week’s presentation by David Townsend of SFCSC, Council moved to allocate 20% of the net annual operating costs to support SFCSC’s proposed Seniors Active Living Centre funding application, to a maximum of $12,000 annually over the next three years in a combination of cash and in-kind services to be negotiated annually with the Township.”

It has been suggested that with the ongoing support of the township, the SFCSC Board may wish to consider inviting a member of Council to sit on their Board.

Tax Sale Policy
Council approved a revised tax sale policy which incorporates the legislative changes from Bill 68. Two related by-laws authorized the treasurer to enter into extension agreements and provided for an administration fee to be charged once the tax sale process is undertaken.

Details about the sale of properties in tax arrears and a flow chart describing the process are available on the Township website, or at the Township office.

Township Granted $80,882 for Commuter Cycling Program
The township’s application through the Public Works department for funding from the Ontario Municipal Commuter Cycling Program has been successful: it will be applied to one of two projects planned for this coming year: fully paved bike lanes between Harrowsmith and Sydenham, or a bike lane adjoining a pedestrian sidewalk along the south side Bedford Road between the end of George Street and Alton Road in Sydenham. Public Works Manager Segsworth also plans to fit in a bike lane on the north side of Bedford; Mayor Vandewal questioned whether this might narrow a busy stretch of road too much. Segsworth replied that because of the busyness of the road, it was also a very dangerous stretch for bicycles.

Storrington Centre Upgrades
Council directed staff to issue an RFP for improvements to the Storrington Centre, to include a new optic system, accessible washrooms and entrances, kitchen upgrades and a new folding wall. $333,000 has been approved in the 2018 capital budget, for this. Councillor Sleeth thanked the Township’s Public Works staff and the Storrington Recreation Committee for all their help in planning the project.

Back-up Generator for OPP Station
Council has approved purchase of a backup generator to provide overall backup power for the OPP building at Hartington. This had been held up when Councillor Revill questioned whether a second generator was needed. Further investigation showed that the existing generator on site at the OPP station only provides fire pump back-up power for the sprinkler system.

Briefly
On the recommendation of Corporate Services Committee, Council agreed to extend the contract with Frontenac Municipal Law Enforcement Inc. for a further two years from March 1, 2018 to Feb 28, 2020.

The 2018 members to serve on the Committee of Adjustment will be: Al Revill, Ross Sutherland, Brad Barbeau and Ron Sleeth.

There being no further questions for the planner, Council approved the zoning of a new waterfront lot on South Basin of Buck Lake, Loughborough district.

Council adopted the Corporate Services Committee’s recommendation to maintain the Township’s current investment strategy and to issue an RFP for investment advisory services.

A proposed by-law to amend speed limits on Rutledge Road was, on Councillor Revill’s recommendation, referred to the Public Works Committee for discussion.

Published in SOUTH FRONTENAC

When you think ‘martial arts,’ chances are your thoughts tend towards the Orient. When weapons are concerned, in particular, swords, the long, curved, slashing blade of the samurai — the katana — usually comes to mind, doesn’t it?

However, there is a long-standing tradition of European martial arts as well and Enterprise’s Robert MacLeod is dedicated to preserving and promoting that tradition.

MacLeod, an anthropologist by trade who teaches at St. Lawrence College in Kingston, is also head instructor at Ironwood Sword School. He runs several classes and is currently beginning an eight-week session at the Bellrock Hall in German Longsword for youths ages 10 and up on Saturday mornings with the motto “Strength, Flexibility, Growth.”

For those unfamiliar with the German martial art, it is a combat system taught during the 1300s by Johannes Liechtenauer.

“There were two schools of longsword, the other being Italian,” MacLeod said. “Actually there was also an English tradition but that wasn’t written down.

“And a big part of what we do is teaching the techniques that come from Liechtenauer and a number of his students. We try to stay close to the historical manuscripts.”

In addition to longsword techniques, MacLeod also includes dagger and wrestling in the Historical European Martial Arts (HEMA) tradition.

“Knives were actually my first love, I started collecting them when I was younger, and then in university I joined the fencing club and started doing sabre,” he said. “But soon after I joined, it went electric and good, clean cuts became flicks in order to score.”

As a young boy, he had taken judo classes and so returned to the Eastern martial arts traditions to study tae-kwon do for several years.

“But then, my son bought a collectable sword and my wife said ‘if he’s going to have it, he should know how to use it,’” MacLeod said. “So, in 2008, we found a group of guys in the park playing with swords and we discovered HEMA.”

That led him to join a local study group working in the German longsword tradition and he was hooked.

“A lot of people really don’t know the longsword,” he said. “It’s a lot lighter than you might think — less than three pounds and just under three feet (blade).

“And it’s a cutting weapon a lot more like a katana than it is like a club, which it often portrayed as in movies.”

MacLeod said he has no problem teaching beginners and has all the equipment needed for novice level students. All the beginners have to have is loose, comfortable clothes (no shorts), flat-soled, non-marking shoes and a pair of thin leather gloves.

The Bellrock classes begin this Saturday (there was actually a class last Saturday but he’s prepared to start again because of the weather issues last week). It’s $100 for an eight-week term, which should take most students through the novice rank to the scholar rank.

While the Bellrock classes are specifically for youths, MacLeod said he’s happy to start a class for adults anywhere in the area if there are four willing students.

Contact MacLeod at 613-358-9642 or www.irnwood.ca for more information.

“Swords are cool,” he said.

 

 

 

 

 

Robert MacLeod runs Benjamin and Anna Tucker through a series of thrusts and parries at the Bellrock Hall, as part of his ongoing series of German longsword classes. Photo/Craig Bakay

Published in SOUTH FRONTENAC

When you think ‘martial arts,’ chances are your thoughts tend towards the Orient. When weapons are concerned, in particular, swords, the long, curved, slashing blade of the samurai — the katana — usually comes to mind, doesn’t it?

However, there is a long-standing tradition of European martial arts as well and Enterprise’s Robert MacLeod is dedicated to preserving and promoting that tradition.

MacLeod, an anthropologist by trade who teaches at St. Lawrence College in Kingston, is also head instructor at Ironwood Sword School. He runs several classes and is currently beginning an eight-week session at the Bellrock Hall in German Longsword for youths ages 10 and up on Saturday mornings with the motto “Strength, Flexibility, Growth.”

For those unfamiliar with the German martial art, it is a combat system taught during the 1300s by Johannes Liechtenauer.

“There were two schools of longsword, the other being Italian,” MacLeod said. “Actually there was also an English tradition but that wasn’t written down.

“And a big part of what we do is teaching the techniques that come from Liechtenauer and a number of his students. We try to stay close to the historical manuscripts.”

In addition to longsword techniques, MacLeod also includes dagger and wrestling in the Historical European Martial Arts (HEMA) tradition.

“Knives were actually my first love, I started collecting them when I was younger, and then in university I joined the fencing club and started doing sabre,” he said. “But soon after I joined, it went electric and good, clean cuts became flicks in order to score.”

As a young boy, he had taken judo classes and so returned to the Eastern martial arts traditions to study tae-kwon do for several years.

“But then, my son bought a collectable sword and my wife said ‘if he’s going to have it, he should know how to use it,’” MacLeod said. “So, in 2008, we found a group of guys in the park playing with swords and we discovered HEMA.”

That led him to join a local study group working in the German longsword tradition and he was hooked.

“A lot of people really don’t know the longsword,” he said. “It’s a lot lighter than you might think — less than three pounds and just under three feet (blade).

“And it’s a cutting weapon a lot more like a katana than it is like a club, which it often portrayed as in movies.”

MacLeod said he has no problem teaching beginners and has all the equipment needed for novice level students. All the beginners have to have is loose, comfortable clothes (no shorts), flat-soled, non-marking shoes and a pair of thin leather gloves.

The Bellrock classes begin this Saturday (there was actually a class last Saturday but he’s prepared to start again because of the weather issues last week). It’s $100 for an eight-week term, which should take most students through the novice rank to the scholar rank.

While the Bellrock classes are specifically for youths, MacLeod said he’s happy to start a class for adults anywhere in the area if there are four willing students.

Contact MacLeod at 613-358-9642 or www.irnwood.ca for more information.

“Swords are cool,” he said.

 

 

 

 

 

Robert MacLeod runs Benjamin and Anna Tucker through a series of thrusts and parries at the Bellrock Hall, as part of his ongoing series of German longsword classes. Photo/Craig Bakay

Published in SOUTH FRONTENAC

Local hockey families will be celebrating their rural roots this January in true country style.

“Our annual dance this year is a Redneck Hoedown,” confirms Lisa Greenwood, a lead organizer of the Storrington Stingers Hockey Association’s annual fundraising dance to be held at Storrington Lions Hall on Jan. 20.
One of the most popular events of the year in Frontenac County, the dance is an important fundraiser for the hockey club which has been running for approximately 60 years.
“We sell-out every year,” says Greenwood with a smile. “People get excited just to know our theme.”

A resident of Battersea and volunteer with the association for the past 10 years, the married mother of one contributes the event’s success to the tightknit community in Storrington.
“Residents take care of each other,” says Greenwood proudly. “Many of the children develop lifelong bonds when they start hockey together at five or six years old and continue to play until they are 18. Along the way, parents become friends. The entire process makes the community closer, stronger and better. Our hockey club is just an extension of an incredible district in Frontenac County.”

According to Greenwood, a small army of volunteers works hard to make the event bigger and better every year.
“It’s a lot of hard work,” she admits with a laugh. “We set our expectations high and work to outdo ourselves every year.”

Reflecting back to last year’s dance and its winter wonderland theme, Greenwood notes, “I had my most fun last year.. We had a lot of positive feedback after that event which made it worth the time and effort. We’re hoping for similar results this year.”
Although most of the food, prizes and raffle items are donated to the dance, expenses such as music and decorations are covered by revenue from the sale of poinsettias; a fundraiser by the club held in late November/early December.

“This time of year is pretty crazy,” admits Greenwood from a busy manufacturing plant in Kingston where she has worked for the past 22 years.
“We’re accepting poinsettia orders until Nov. 25 and the plants will be delivered on Dec. 6.”
According to Greenwood, profits from the dance are directed back to the players.

“What’s raised at the dance goes to the players’ end-of-year party,” she says. “Approximately 115 players and volunteers receive a memento of their hockey year.”
The club will also use the money to replace jerseys and purchase socks.

“We’re always getting new jerseys,” she says thoughtfully. “Thankfully, sponsors also help out because jerseys cost a lot.”
Grateful for the support of the community, Greenwood is looking forward to another successful fundraiser in support of the local hockey club.

“I enjoy doing this,” she replies when asked to describe her involvement. “I love being hands-on. I love to see the kids and parents enjoying their hockey season.”
To order a poinsettia or reserve tickets to the Storrington Stingers hockey dance on Jan. 20, please call Lisa Greenwood at 613-353-7561 or text 613-770-1017.

Published in SOUTH FRONTENAC

After a two-year absence to to field repairs and improvements, the 10th annual Bubba Bowl returned to the field at Point Park in Sydenham last Friday. The Junior Sydenham High School Golden Eagles won 30-7 while a very young senior side fell 28-7.
The Bubba Bowl is held annually to honour Alex (Bubba) Turcotte, a former player who died of heart disease before he got to play his final season at SHS.
The opponents this year were the LaSalle Secondary School Black Knights.

The senior Knights were a force to be reckoned with, featuring several very large human beings and plenty of experience.
However, despite being over matched size- and experience-wise, the Golden Eagles made a game of it when they came out in the second half.
Down 14-0, running back Simon Cook went on a tear, including one 72-yard run and after a couple of LaSalle fumbles, quarterback Ray Whitehead completed a scoring pass to wideout Nick Vankoughnett.
However, both Whitehead and Vankoughnett went down to injuries and it was pretty much all LaSalle after that. The Knights scored a pair of touchdowns in the waning minutes of the fourth quarter.

“You’ve got nothing to be ashamed of,” head coach Jim Latimer told his team after the game. “There was elevated intensity on every play.
“But come playoff time, we have to be even better. Nobody’s going to want to see us in the playoffs.”
Latimer himself even admitted to feeling hopeful as the second half began.
“But then we had three major injuries and our guys are so young.”

Still, most of those young guys made it to the finals in junior last year and they’re getting the hang of the senior game.
On the junior side, it was pretty much all Sydenham as Dain Bailey led the way with three touchdowns, two of which came in the opening frame. Chad Branscombe also scored a major and Owen O’Mera added a field goal and three converts.
Coach Karl Hammer said quarterback Jack Richards is “really establishing himself — he’s a great thinker in panic situations. He seems to see things happening.”
Hammer said on defence, middle linebacker Vince Pople is “certainly coming into his own.”

The fact that Hammer’s opposing head coach on this night was his dad (also Karl) was secondary to him as his team performed on both sides of the ball.
“It was a great team effort,” he said. “We didn’t have to leave our starters in and our backups got in some great reps.
“They’re starting to understand this game.”

Published in SOUTH FRONTENAC
Wednesday, 30 August 2017 16:26

Ride, James, Ride!

Pedalling and singing ‘Little Red Wagon” (the pop version, not the nursery-rhyme one), nine-year old James Potvin has reached Sydenham, the mid-point of his journey from Whitby to Ottawa. His destination is the big new Giver Playground in Mooney's Bay, Ottawa, and he plans to get thereFriday evening.

“It was just a month ago when I asked James what he would like to do to celebrate the end of summer holidays” James’ father Chris explains, “and he said he wanted to bike to Ottawa, to the Giver 150 playground.” Chris told James that if he could bike from Whitby to the CN Tower in one day, they’d consider heading for Ottawa. They not only got into Toronto, but even biked through the downtown; “When I saw my nine-year-old cycling down University Avenue, I realized he was definitely up to a much longer trip.”

Their route follows, as much as possible, the Waterfront, Cataraqui and TransCanada trails, and has included a loop down through Prince Edward County. So far, the Cat Trail has been the smoothest ride. Unfortunately there is no designated cycle trail from Smiths Falls to Ottawa, so they will be following the roads along the Rideau canal.

James and his Dad decided to make their Odyssey a fundraiser for the Grandview Centre which provides services in Durham Region for 6,000 children with special needs, and their families. James, who is on the Autism spectrum, is on the Grandview waiting list, along with 3,000 others. Already, James has exceeded his original goal of $1500, and is now heading for double that. “One dollar for every child on the waiting list,’ says Chris. James has been surprised and delighted by the encouragement and support offered by people in Whitby and all along the route. They have been camping in peoples’ backyards, and people keeping track of their progress on Facebook and Twitter (#RideJamesRide) often come out to cheer them on.

James’ energy and spirits remain high, despite a broken chain in midtown Picton, and a few bandaids on his legs. His trip logo, on his shirt and his bike, is a puzzle piece. Chris explains: “We’re also trying to raise awareness of Autism; the puzzle piece signifies that people on the spectrum ‘have all the pieces, but sometimes find it hard to fit them together.’ He said he had noticed that since the trip began, James is developing more confidence in his own ability to solve problems without being overcome with frustration.
To follow James or add a donation, go to #RideJamesRide.

Published in FRONTENAC COUNTY
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