Art in the Sawmill returns to Verona for sixth year

Written by  Wednesday, 08 August 2018 10:31
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Elaine Farragher has been known to do portraits but of late has been more of a landscape artist, many of which, she says, are inspired by outings on the K & P Trail. Photo/Craig Bakay Elaine Farragher has been known to do portraits but of late has been more of a landscape artist, many of which, she says, are inspired by outings on the K & P Trail. Photo/Craig Bakay

Since 2013, Verona’s Art in the Sawmill has hosted an eclectic summer show of quilters, crafters, image-makers and artists, and this year was no exception. From the jewelry of Carolyn Boyle and Bill Anderson to the animal depictions of Lisa Ferguson and Katie Ohlke (loved the bear), there was a wide range of visual interpretations on display last Saturday and Sunday in the old converted mill house.

One of the more intriguing entries this year is newcomer Elaine Farragher, whose acrylic landscapes often feature scenes of the K & P Trail, many featuring water.

But as interesting as her above-water scenes are, perhaps her most fascinating works are those that take place below the water’s surface, featuring what’s going on with the area’s fish population.

“I’ve begun snorkeling where we live on Hambly Lake,” she said. “When you look under the water, there are so many fish.

“And I actually do like painting fish.”

She said there are lots of fishermen on her lake and her paintings lead to discussions.

Her fish paintings also include a lot of bubbles, understated, but still a fascinating inclusion.

“I also love painting bubbles,” she said. “And maybe the underwater scenes are an excuse to paint them, but it’s mostly the fish.

“Especially the perch — they’re so pretty.”

Farragher started painting in her 20s but stopped for about 30 years while living in Toronto.

“I took some night courses in Toronto, but that was about it,” she said. “When we moved to this area about 12 years ago, well, I couldn’t not paint.

“This is a very inspiring area.”

Farragher works in acrylics from photos downloaded to her laptop.

“I don’t have a lot of room where I work,” she said. “Just enough for an easel and the laptop.

“But I did get an underwater camera.”

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