Multi-media festival impresses at Sydenham High School

Multi-media festival impresses at Sydenham High School

The impressive multi-media work of close to 200 students at Sydenham High School was included at the biennial Multi-media Festival, which was held at the school on December 11. Headed up by Dawn Wall...

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Flyers give back

Flyers give back

The Frontenac Flyers Peesee Rep team held a very successful food drive at the Verona Foodland and Trousdale's stores in Sydenham on November 22nd. The team's coach,Brian Brown, came up with the idea o...

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North Frontenac Council

North Frontenac Council

Written By: Jeff Green | Published: December-18-2014 | Category: NORTH FRONTENAC
Tagged Under: Council, Municipal Government

Perry returned as North Frontenac Deputy Mayor The first item of business for North Frontenac Council this week, once the ceremonial swearing in was taken care of, was to choose a deputy mayor from a...

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Small bus companies taking Tri-Board Transportation back to court

Small bus companies taking Tri-Board Transportation back to court

A number of bus companies that serve students in Frontenac County are joining with other members of the Independent School Bus Operators Association (ISBOA) in taking Tri-Board Transportation to court...

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Looking forward to 2015

Looking forward to 2015

Written By: Jeff Green | Published: December-18-2014 | Category: Editorials
Tagged Under:

This is our final issue of the year, and we hope you enjoy the seasonal content, colourful drawings and Christmas greetings in it. Even though we are taking our annual two-week break from publishing,...

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South Frontenac Township Council - December 16, 2014

Common Element Lanes in Subdivisions A public meeting was held on the subject of amending the Offic...

Winter Driving (or, this is Canada, after all…)

At a recent meeting between South Frontenac OPP, township staff and local reporters, we discussed wi...

Harrowsmith’s Frontenac Friesians

Those who were lucky enough to catch a glimpse of the six gorgeous black horses that walked in this ...

Hour of Code at NAEC

Submitted by NAEC On Dec. 12 at North Addington Education Centre, over one hundred elementary and s...

Twelve Days of Holiday Fire Safety

Join the “12 Days of Holiday Fire Safety” make the Fire Marshal’s wish come true for the most fire-s...

DoFaSo in Yarker gives unwanted pianos new purposes

At a special holiday Christmas market at the Verona Lions hall on December 13, many of the Frontenac...

Christmas celebrations at the Child Care Centre

This year's annual Christmas Open House at the Child Care Centre in Sharbot Lake on December 6 was v...

A prayer

by Rev. Patsy Henry, Harrowsmith-Verona Pastoral Charge Last night as my family began turning off t...

A Christmas Tale

by George Allen It was early Christmas morning, not so long ago, in a quiet little town all covered...

The deal of all time

by the Reverend Father George Kwari, incumbent of the Parishes of Maberly-Lanark &Parham-Sharbot...

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North Frontenac Council - Apr 29/14

North Frontenac Council - Apr 29/14

North Frontenac passes budget amid looming OPP cost crisis After several months of budget-crunching sessions between staff and council, North Frontenac managed to square the circle - almost, coming up with a 2014 budget that established a reserve for long-term infrastructure whi...

North Frontenac Council - Apr 8/14

North Frontenac tax levy to go up by 3% Most of increase devoted to long-term needs While the levy to ratepayers in North Frontenac is going up by 3% this year, the operating budgets of township departments have been trimmed. As part of the asset management strategy that Council took on late last year, North Frontenac has set aside 2% of the money they raise from taxation to put in a fund to cover replacement costs for all roads, bridges and buildings that the township owns. That left a tax increase for township operations of $53,214 (1.06%), even as a number of fixed costs went up. “There was some new spending, including $15,000 as part of our doctor recruitment commitment for the Lakelands Health Team and $54,000 for playground equipment, which will only be spent if we get a grant that we have applied for,” said township Chief Administrative Officer Cheryl Robson. “In order to keep from a larger increase in the levy each department was asked to find cuts, which they did. There were no cuts to service, but it will be a lean year this year.” The township's draft budget, which will include a total levy of $5.2 million to North Frontenac ratepayers, was approved in principle at a meeting of council on Monday (April 7) and will be presented for public comment at the beginning of the next council meeting on April 28. It is anticipated that the budget document will be approved by bylaw at that time. The two other components of the tax bill that goes to North Frontenac ratepayers, county and education taxes, are each up by about $35,000 this year, for a total increase of $125,000 to be split among all the township's ratepayers. Pine Lake It's been almost eight years since members of the Ardoch Algonquin First Nation occupied a piece of public land adjacent to a boat launch at Pine Lake, off Ardoch Road. The small property, which is managed by the Ministry of Natural Resources, (MNR) has continued to be used as a boat launch and there is a small road running over it between Ardoch Road and the lake. Back in 2006, the Ardoch Algonquins asserted an Aboriginal claim to the property by cutting trees and putting up a portable metal building. Their stated intention was to establish a band office on the property. But nothing has happened on the property for a number of years, except that brush has grown where the trees had been cleared. The portable building has remained but has not been used at all. In February, the township authorized CAO Cheryl Robson to write the MNR asking that the portable be removed. “Council requests that MNR remove this derelict portable from this property, at your earliest possible convenience,” said Cheryl Robson in a letter to Michael Gatt of the Bancroft ministry office. Last week a letter of response came from Suzy Shalla, Resources Management Supervisor in Bancroft. “I did want to respond to thank you and the Council for bringing forward your concerns regarding the structure located near the boat launch at Pine Lake. MNR is aware of the structure that is located there, however we will not be pursuing removal of the building at this time.” Township office remediation update - Township staff remain housed in portable offices as well as a temporary office in the Clar-Mill fire hall as Service Master and Concord Engineering continue to work on the heating oil spill that took place in early February. Council received a report from Concord Engineering which says that there is no evidence that the ground under the building has been contaminated, but a number of walls and some flooring has been removed as part of ongoing clean-up efforts. There is no time frame for the completion of repairs, which are all covered by the township's insurance policy. Ompah fire hall and community hall back to square one Council soundly rejected two proposals for upgrades to the Ompah fire hall/community hall property. The first proposal, which came in response to a tender for repairs and upgrades, would have cost $360,000. It was supported by Councilor John Inglis and rejected by the rest of Council. The second proposal, which was put forward by Councillor Wayne Good, would have capped spending on upgrades at $50,000, inclusive of a $10,000 accessibility expenditures that is mandated by the Province of Ontario. Although Council has put aside over $200,000 for the project, Good wanted to redirect that money to build a new township office. Good pointed out that there is only one trained firefighter living within a 5 km radius of the hall, and a limited capacity hall would serve the community needs. His proposal was supported by himself, and no one else. Councilor Betty Hunter then proposed that $180,000 be spent on the hall, and that the Ompah fire hall task force, which came up with the proposal that led to the $360,000 tender, be brought back together to figure out how to spend only $180,000 on the building, and do so this year. Her motion was accepted. An additional $50,000 has been pledged by the Ompah volunteers, and there remains an additional $10,000 available for accessibility features.

North Frontenac Council Feb. 3

Septic re-inspection program Ed Gardiner, from Kingston Frontenac Lennox and Addington Public Health, made a proposal to council for a mandatory septic re-inspection program. Until now the township has been contracting with the Mississippi-Rideau Septic System office for a voluntary program. But each of the last two years the number of systems inspected has lagged below the target because a number of landowners have been unresponsive to repeated attempts to engage them in a re-inspection. Changes to Ontario legislation have permitted municipalities to engage in mandatory programs if they choose to do so. One of the stipulations is that the re-inspections be done by the same agency that is responsible for approvals to new septic systems. In the case of North Frontenac that agency is KFL&A Public Health. Gardiner said that it would cost the township $12,000 per year for the health unit to complete 160 inspections, with a focus on inspecting high risk systems, properties with no record of approved sewage systems, or properties with systems that are over 20 years old. He said that the program would be run out of the KFL&A office in Cloyne and that inspection reports would be sent to the landowner and the township. As far as enforcement is concerned Ed Gardiner said that if a report says remedial action is required, “a reasonable amount of time, determined by the township chief building official,” should be given. “If no action is taken the chief building official or the inspector will issue an order to comply,” he said. The township has now received two proposals, one from Mississippi-Rideau and one from KFL&A Public Health. In order to proceed they will have to choose one or the other to do all of their inspection work, on new and old systems. Planner ready to go to the OMB if necessary Joe Gallivan, the planner for Frontenac County, presented the second draft of the Frontenac County Official Plan to Council. Gallivan said the plan, which sets out a policy framework and leaves most of the detailed information to the township plan, has been submitted to the Ministry of Municipal Affairs for comment. Based on the response of the ministry to the Renfrew County Official Plan, and the North Frontenac Official Plan, Gallivan said he is concerned about how the ministry will likely respond to the approach the county is taking. “Frankly I'm not that optimistic at this point. It might be that we end up with an OMB challenge on this.” Two issues are of major concern to Gallivan, and to North Frontenac, who are at an impasse with the ministry with their own plan. One is the ministry position that no new development shall be permitted on private roads, even if there are strong rules in place about the quality and width of those roads. The other deals with the ministry's insistence that development be oriented to hamlets and villages, “which is totally contrary to the demand for development on the ground in places like Frontenac County,” Gallivan said. Construction up in 2013 Building permits were issued for over $7.3 million worth of construction in 2013, including six new inland and 20 new waterfront residences. The total for 2012 was $6.3 million. Mayor talks about County Mayor Clayton, who is also the Warden of Frontenac County, said he remains frustrated about the county budget process. “I still feel there is some push back from some of the managers at the county. When we ask them to make cuts they come back with reasons why it is impossible to make any. All we are asking of the two major programs, Fairmount Home and land ambulance, is that they bring costs to the average of costs among services of comparative size, instead of above the average. I think the administration of both programs could be a bit top-heavy,” he said. In summing up a strategic planning session, Clayton said, “There is an expression that goes 'if the people won't change, change the people'. There may be something that needs to happen like that.” War memorial funding frustration Councilor Gerry Martin has been chairing a task force that has been developing a proposal for a war memorial in the township for the past year. The task force was planning to submit an application for funding to the Community War Memorial Program, a five-year granting program administered by Veterans' Affairs Canada that was set to run until 2015. However, when the task force contacted Veterans' Affairs in January, seeking an application form for the program, they received the response that “unfortunately the Community War Memorial Program is no longer accepting funding applications due to higher than anticipated demand.” Martin prepared a letter to MP Scott Reid asking for his assistance in dealing with Veterans' Affairs on the matter. Council approved the letter.

Clayton Doubtful in North Frontenac

“I don't know yet,” said Bud Clayton when asked if he was planning to seek re-election as mayor of North Frontenac after one four-year term. “If things remain the way they are now, I would say it would be no, but things can change.” Clayton added that he had not planed to run during the last election in 2010, but decided at the last minute to give former Deputy Mayor Jim Beam a run for his money since there were no other candidates coming forward. He ended up winning. “I don't want to hang on past my best-before date,” Clayton said this week, “but I have not made a final decision by any means.” Gutowski leaning towards running in Central Frontenac “In all likelihood I will be running,” two-time incumbent Janet Gutowski said when asked if she was going to run for a third term as mayor of Central Frontenac. “I'm very committed to this township and I think there is still a lot to be accomplished,” she said. Among the issues that Gutowski will be addressing during the election year are seniors’ housing and the future of service delivery in Central Frontenac. “I can see us seeking partnerships with other townships and a continued role for Frontenac County as well,” she said. “Provincial policies are always impacting us as a township, and the City of Kingston has an impact on our residents on a daily basis because they run our social services. It is only through the county that we can even talk to them; there is no other venue.”

North Frontenac Council - Dec. 17/13

North Frontenac pulls back from hall redundancy. After meeting with user groups from the Snow Road, Harlowe, and Clarendon and Miller halls, North Frontenac Council decided to rescind part of a bylaw they passed last July, which stipulated that the halls were to be declared as surplus property in the future. Mayor Clayton had maintained that declaring the halls surplus did not necessarily mean they would be closing, only that they would no longer be in line for re-building at the end of their useful life. However, he has also talked about a township preference for building a single, central hall and township office. Councilors have been hearing from hall users ever since the bylaw was passed in July, and at their meeting the clause about declaring the halls surplus was removed. Asset management plan finalized Vicki Leakey, from KPMG, presented the final version of the North Frontenac Asset Management Plan to council. Municipalities in Ontario are required to have these plans in place if they are to be eligible for provincial infrastructure grants next year. Some municipalities have produced basic documents that were created by sending data to a consulting firm and receiving a template-based document back. In North Frontenac's case, KPMG has met extensively with staff and council and the plan has been under development all year. The North Frontenac plan encompasses paved roads, bridges, equipment, and all township-owned buildings. Next year information about gravel roads will be added. Leakey's report concludes, as she told council last month when presenting a draft, that the township has done a good job of investing in infrastructure needs over the last 10 years, and by parceling off an added 2% in taxation towards infrastructure spending into the future, they will come closer to keeping up with the requirement for rebuilding roads, bridges, equipment, and buildings as they age and need to be replaced. Leakey costed out the rebuilding at $7.5 million. “There is not a municipality in Ontario that is not falling behind, at least to some extent, and North Frontenac is probably doing better than most,” Leakey said. One factor that is not in North Frontenac's favour is its negative growth rate, which among other things, means less money is available from property taxes. The report presented it in stark terms. “While the province's population increased by 19.5% between 1996 and 2011, North Frontenac's population dropped by 3.9%.” And those who remain in North Frontenac are ageing. Thirty-nine percent of the total personal income among township residents is derived from pensions, while the provincial average is 14%. “The greater reliance on fixed income pension reduces the ability of the municipality to raise funds through taxation,” said Leakey's report. OPP billing questions The township supported efforts by other municipalities to scuttle a proposed new billing system for OPP services that would see the township charged on a per household basis, including seasonal as well as permanent residents. Township staff calculate this would bring the North Frontenac bill from $205,000 to $1.15 million - a 458% increase. “It's funny how they bill us for the seasonal residents but when it comes to grants they look only at our permanent residents,” said Mayor Clayton. “They like to play both sides of the coin.”

CENTRAL FRONTENAC NEWS

Christmas celebrations at the Child Care Centre

Christmas celebrations at the Child Care Centre

This year's annual Christmas Open House at the Child Care Centre in Sharbot Lake on December 6 was very well attended. Staff from Northern Frontenac Community Services transformed the centre into a festive holiday hub for the entire family. Santa was on site speaking to youngster...

The Festival of Trees 2014

For close to 15 years now, the Festival of Trees has sparked off the holiday season in Central Frontenac as well as raising funds for two important organizations. Once again, hats off to the members of Villages Beautiful, their dedicated crew of community volunteers and the countless generous donors whose efforts once again magically transformed Oso hall in Sharbot Lake into a festive wonderland of holiday sights and sounds. Admission is a donation to the food bank and from Dec. 11 - 13, hundreds of visitors of all ages attended this year's festival, whose theme was the "Traditions of Christmas". The beauty of the Festival of Trees is its ability to engage so many people from the local community -from those who either help run and organize it, to those who donate and /or perform at it, and finally to those who wouldn't miss it for the world, and who come every year to enjoy it. The festival is the main fundraiser for Villages Beautiful, and the proceeds are used to spiffy up our villages and hamlets with fresh plants, shrubs, trees and flowers in the spring. What is truly amazing about the festival is the great lengths that donors will go to to make their entries not only memorable but much sought after. On the day before the festival's opening, many donors cram into Oso Hall to decorate their trees, assemble their gift baskets and hang their wreaths, artworks and gingerbread creations and other theme-related offerings. This year's entries were as usual, top notch and very creative, and the stellar line up of talented singers and musicians brought the hall to life over the duration of the festival. Congratulations to all of the winners and here are a few pictures highlighting some of the special memories from this years Festival of Trees.

175 Nativities at Cole Lake Free Methodist Church

The fourth annual “101 Nativities” show and celebration took place at the Cole Lake Free Methodist Church from November 21-23 and was organized by Jean Freeman and Kristine Caird. The exhibit included approximately 175 nativities from all over the world, and were lent to the show by members of the church congregation and the local community. This year, Mary Murphy of St. Patrick's Catholic Church in Railton also lent a number of scenes. This year's standouts included one scene from Africa made from hammered tin, a Mexican scene carved from a single gourd, and a hand-knit nativity scene that was made by Kristine's aunt, Joan Fellow of Murvale. More than 150 guests attended over the three days and enjoyed holiday snacks and refreshments at a number of tables set up in the showroom. Caird said that this year's focus was on the youngsters, who were invited to make a number of shrink art holiday crafts. Each child also had a chance to colour and take home their very own nativity scene, which Caird said helps to demonstrate to them the true meaning of Christmas. The Cole Lake organizers paid back Mary Murphy's generosity by lending a number of nativities from their collection to her own church’s Nativity Sunday, which took place in Railton on Dec. 7. Both events are meant to connect members of the local community with the real meaning of Christmas, which Jean Freeman said “is the birth of Christ who came into the world to save us from our sins.”

Giant holiday gift stocking to be raffled off at the Treasure Trunk

Staff at the Treasure Trunk in Sharbot Lake will be raffling off their gigantic Christmas holiday gift stocking, which they have filled to the brim with Christmas goodies for the entire family. The stocking includes brand new gifts items that have been donated by businesses and individuals from the local community, including brand new flannel pajamas, slippers, hats, scarves, mittens, New Year's Eve crackers, numerous games, toys and crafts for youngsters, plus body lotions, jewelry and more. The draw will take place at noon on December 19 at the Treasure Trunk. Proceeds from the raffle will help to fund a new CLNF video titled “We Are the Champions”, which was created for Community Living by local videographer Jesse Mills and shows how Community Living-NF assists members of the community with its many diverse programs. Janet Barr, vocational instructor with CLNF at the Treasure Trunk, said the raffle is the first one of its kind. Tickets cost $2 can be purchased at the Treasure Trunk up until the day of the draw. Holiday shoppers looking for special gift giving ideas should note that the Treasure Trunk is also selling a wide range of special Christmas-themed holiday gift baskets and gift certificates for the upcoming holiday season. The Treasure Trunk is located at 1171 Canon Road in Sharbot Lake and is open until December 24, Monday to Friday from 9 am-3pm. It will be closed from Christmas Day until New Year's Day.

Seniors' fitness in Sharbot Lake

A senior's exercise program is offered free of charge through the Sharbot Lake Family Health Team, and on December 8 participants attended the final week of classes for the fall session. Judging by the 65 seniors who just wrapped up the program, local seniors know well that one of the best ways to stave off the negative effects of aging and to stay healthy is to be active. “Exercise at any age is beneficial,” said Ashley Williams, the new occupational therapist at the SLFHT, who sparked off the eight-session program, which began in October 2014. The one-hour classes were held at the community room at the Sharbot Lake Medical Centre and included a cardio component with walking and other aerobic exercises; upper and lower body strength training; exercises for the core and also balance and coordination exercises. The program includes an educational component and every few weeks a health care professional spoke to participants about a specific health-related topic. The fall session included a visit by the SLFHT's registered dietician, who spoke about appropriate sizes of meal portions, protein shakes and more. Williams outlined the benefits to seniors of regular exercise and how the fitness classes help improve cardio-vascular performance, over-all strength, balance and coordination, which together can help minimize falls. The social benefits are also worth mentioning and the classes offer seniors the chance to meet regularly with friends, form new relationships and have fun while exercising. Williams said that participants have spoken about having increased strength and overall health as a result of the classes, with some being able to perform tasks around their homes that they had been unable to perform prior to the classes. The 2015 winter session will begin on January 19. Classes take place on Mondays and Thursdays. Participants should wear rubber-soled shoes and loose clothing. For more information, contact Ashley Williams at 6132-279-2100 ext 128.

SOUTH FRONTENAC NEWS

Multi-media festival impresses at Sydenham High School

Multi-media festival impresses at Sydenham High School

The impressive multi-media work of close to 200 students at Sydenham High School was included at the biennial Multi-media Festival, which was held at the school on December 11. Headed up by Dawn Wallace, who has been teaching multi-media communications and technology at the scho...

Flyers give back

The Frontenac Flyers Peesee Rep team held a very successful food drive at the Verona Foodland and Trousdale's stores in Sydenham on November 22nd. The team's coach,Brian Brown, came up with the idea of the Flyer's mounting a drive to give back to the community, and the public was happy to oblige. 327.25 pounds of food and $959.11 was donated to the South Frontenac Community Services Food Bank as the result of a real team effort. Photos: The first picture 4581_1 is  The second one is Owen Deyo, Jacob Snider, Jarod Brown 

South Frontenac Township Council - December 16, 2014

Common Element Lanes in Subdivisions A public meeting was held on the subject of amending the Official Plan to permit roads within subdivisions to be designated common elements, to be maintained by residents as a condominium feature, in relation to the Magenta waterfront development. Several residents expressed concern: Peter Roos asked, “How will this benefit the township?” Developer Mike Keene spoke in favour of the change, saying that most cottage roads in Haliburton and Muskoka were being zoned this way. Planner Mills said there were concerns about long-term effects of this sort of zoning, and that he would like to have a lawyer’s opinion. Although the report will go to the Ministry of Municipal Affairs, any final decision on the matter will rest with the township. Term appointments to Township Committees Deputy Mayor McDougall brought a motion that all future volunteer appointments to township committees should be limited to two terms, or eight years, in order to bring in more volunteers, and fresh ideas. This was passed. Massive Staff Report Requested Councillor Schjerning brought a notice of motion that requests “a comprehensive report outlining areas where the township is not in compliance with all applicable federal or provincial statutory requirements.” This motion asks that such a report include full details on any areas of non-compliance, to include what is required to become compliant, how much time and expense would be required, and potential liability of non-compliance. This would address 19 acts and their regulations, as well as all township bylaws. The motion asked that this report be completed by February 1, a week before Council’s all-day budget session. In speaking to the motion, Schjerning said he was in no way criticizing the work of previous councils, but that this information would assist the current council in their strategic planning and budgeting. In response, CAO Orr said that although there was no question that the municipality was not in 100% compliance with every bylaw, piece of legislation and regulation, they are also limited in staff and fiscal resources, and by the need to maintain service delivery. He suggested the end of March would be a more realistic deadline. Councillor Revill said, “My impression is that our township’s in pretty good shape, particularly in terms of complying with regulatory matters: I’d prefer we give staff the time needed (to do this report).” Councillor Sutherland said, “This looks like an impossible task; [we’re talking about] a hugely complicated set of acts and by-laws. This is a relatively complex township. I’d prefer something that hits on any major areas where we’re out of sync. Also, this is a moving target: I’d just ask for a ‘best effort’.” Deputy Mayor McDougall suggested that perhaps this was something council could address as a group, two or three topics at a time, as a form of in-service training. Schjerning said he did not want to see this process postponed to next year’s budget. Mayor Vandewal said staff should be given six months: “This is way too onerous to ask, particularly when budget planning is being done late, because this has been an election year.” In the end, the motion was amended to permit a March 31 deadline for the report, and passed. Winter Roads Maintenance Councillor Schjerning brought forward a motion that all township roads with full-time residents should be identified and provided full winter maintenance for the 2014/15 winter season. Several councillors objected, on the grounds that this process is already underway, and in the hands of the Public Service Committee. McDougall said staff had been working on this for two years, and it was a complicated issue. Wayne Orr noted that the township has no standard to define permanent residency. Councillor Roberts said he was not comfortable with agreeing to a project with an unknown cost. Mayor Vandewal said that the motion seemed premature. The motion was deferred. Johnson/Loughborough Lake Staff is preparing a report for the new council on the history of the Johnson/Loughborough Lake condo application, which will be available well before an open public session is set up. Energy Conservation/Municipal Loan Program Council agreed with Councillor Sutherland’s motion that more information be provided about this loan program. McDougall said the County has one prepared, and will be available to present it. Public Works Reports Public Works Manager Segsworth reported that the township’s program to provide upgrading assistance to private lanes, now in its seventh year, has been very successful, with 24 lanes submitting applications last year. He recommends consideration be given to increasing the amount available for the program in next year’s budget. Council accepted Segsworth’s recommendation that Kingston Utilities’ contract for maintenance of the Sydenham Water Plant be extended to the end of 2015. Holiday Hours SF Township office will be closed in the week between Christmas and New Year, re-opening on Friday January 2.

Winter Driving (or, this is Canada, after all…)

At a recent meeting between South Frontenac OPP, township staff and local reporters, we discussed winter driving in South Frontenac. Constable Roop Sandhu and Public Works Manager Mark Segsworth are working together to try to reduce winter road accidents in South Frontenac. It brought back memories. I have never forgotten the time my mother was seriously injured in a car accident on an icy road just north of Kingston and the terror of rushing down two flights of stairs in the middle of the night in Toronto to answer a heavy pounding on the door, to meet the uniformed policeman who had come to tell me. I also remember vividly another time, the sense of a thousand pounds of moving metal out of my control, watching the guard rails loom up first on one side of the road then the other, while time slowed down incredibly during the few actual moments before the car thumped to a stop, safely, in a shallow ditch. Afterward, the adrenaline hit, the disorientation, the shivering, the sheer luck this time. Those of us who drive, or know people who drive, can tell similar or worse stories. In other words, all of us. Our local police, emergency rescue staff and volunteers, and road crews are far too often grimly reminded of how an apparently normal situation can snap within seconds into a scene of horror. The roads crews work hard at keeping our roads safe to drive, and are continuously trying to improve, to respond as quickly and effectively as possible to the results of capricious winter conditions. “We know there are things we could be better at,” says South Frontenac Public Works Manager Mark Segsworth, “and we’re constantly trying to improve.” Segsworth welcomes comments and questions, preferring phone calls to e-mails. (613 376-3090, ext 3322). The Ontario Municipal Act of 2001 divides roads into five classes: the 400 highways are class 1; Road 38 is class 2; the former county roads are class 3; the rest are classes 4 & 5. This ranking is determined by measuring a combination of posted speed and traffic volume. Details of minimum standards of maintenance are set for each. These standards address things such as monitoring road and weather conditions, snow clearance, ice treatment, potholes, etc. Details are available on the Service Ontario website. Most times, the S.F. Roads Department exceeds these standards: e.g. according to the legislation, on a class 3 road such as Sydenham Road an icy surface must be treated within 8 hours, and 8 cm/3” of snow should be cleared within 12 hours. For our part, we must be prepared for driving in snowy, icy conditions during weather changes. “The major cause of all rural Ontario road accidents is speed too fast for the road conditions,” says Roop Sandhu of the South Frontenac Detachment. Sandhu’s three main recommendations are: Drive at a speed appropriate to the road conditions; Have winter tires and good vehicle maintenance (e.g. winter wiper blades, washing fluids topped up); Carry an emergency kit: blanket, flashlight, phone, additional warm clothing, etc. He reminds us that at 60 km/hr, it takes 20 metres to stop on a dry road, but 70 metres to stop from the same speed on ice: “Adjust your speed, slow down when conditions are poor, leave a greater distance between vehicles.” Sandhu also recommends using full headlights, not just running lights in snowstorms, so your vehicle’s tail lights are visible. “And don’t pass a snow plow. They’re there for a reason.”

Harrowsmith’s Frontenac Friesians

Those who were lucky enough to catch a glimpse of the six gorgeous black horses that walked in this year’s Santa Claus parades in Sydenham and Harrowsmith (and who won “Best New to the Parade” at the Kingston parade) may be interested to know that these regal animals, the Frontenac Friesians, call Harrowsmith home. Known for their characteristic “upright head sets, high stepping trot, shiny black coats and luscious tails and manes”, Friesians have a mystical and noble presence and have appeared in many popular films, including Ladyhawk, Zorro, and Lord of the Rings, in which they were cast as the Dark Riders. The Frontenac Friesians have yet to star in a major Hollywood film and spend their time at a small hobby farm located on Bradford Road, where their proud owner, Debbie Givens, gives them plenty of love and attention. The horses are named Lyske, Sunday, Viktor, Joe Black, Dave and Andy and they made a memorable impression on those who saw them walking in the parades. Givens is well versed in the art of caring for horses and previously ran a large horse boarding facility just north of Kingston. She eventually decided that the facility was too large to manage and enjoy while she was also working full time, so she decided to scale down and moved to a small hobby farm in Harrowsmith in 2008, where she resides with her husband and two daughters. With help from her mother, Debbie was able to pursue her “bucket list dream” of acquiring the best purebred Friesian mare she could find. She did just that and the mare that she was driving carriage with at the parades is named Lyske Meintse, and came from Kettle Creek Friesians in London, Ontario. Lyske has been judged by the FPS, the Holland group that controls the integrity of purebred Friesians world-wide, as a “Star”, meaning that she is in the top 30% of the FPS's quality judged breeding mares. Givens has since bred Lyske with two different purebred Friesians from Michigan and in 2013 she gave birth to a filly, Sunday, and in 2014 to a colt named Viktor. While there are no births on the horizon for 2015, Givens has acquired frozen semen from the Netherlands and is hoping for a purebred Friesian foal again in 2016. She also breeds half Friesian horses and her mare Andy, which is part thoroughbred and part standard bred, was bred twice with a Friesian stallion named Jisk in Peterborough. In 2011 she birthed a half-Friesian colt named Joe Black and in 2014 birthed Dave The Friesians’ laid back and amazing behavior at the three local parades, especially given their young ages, demonstrates that these animals are highly trainable and reliable and that they like to please. Givens said she practiced with her horses a few times before the parades and was thrilled with their behavior, saying humbly, “I know my horses.” When I visited at the farm, Givens was feeding the herd and said that she can’t wait to retire in 2019 so she can devote more time to the animals she loves so much. Until then she will continue to breed, ride and show them - and she may even be convinced to sell one of these majestic lovelies, though she admits that a sale might take a wee bit of arm twisting. Givens is a member of the Ontario Friesian Horse Association and the Friesian Horse Association of North America. For more information visit the Frontenac Friesians on facebook or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

FRONTENAC COUNTY NEWS

Small bus companies taking Tri-Board Transportation back to court

Small bus companies taking Tri-Board Transportation back to court

A number of bus companies that serve students in Frontenac County are joining with other members of the Independent School Bus Operators Association (ISBOA) in taking Tri-Board Transportation to court. Tri-Board, which handles busing for students in the Limestone, and the Hasting...

Santa Claus parades spark off the 2014 holiday season

For many it is the local Santa Claus parades that mark the start of the Christmas season in these parts and the numerous parades that took place in North, South and Central Frontenac are always welcome and exciting events, especially for youngsters and the young at heart. This year's parades seemed especially festive with a plethora of colourful floats courtesy of the numerous businesses, organizations, service clubs and individuals, who despite the bustle of the holiday season took the time to put together their unique parade offerings. This year it seemed there were more colourfully clad youngsters, more live animals and more live music than in parades past. Whatever the reason, here are just a few snap shot memories from the parades that took place in Sydenham, Harrowsmith, Sharbot Lake, Tichborne/Parham, Northbrook and North Frontenac. Sharbot Lake Elsa waves from the Northern Frontenac Community Services' Disney inspired “Frozen” float  Denbigh It was a crisp evening for the Santa Claus Parade in the village; even still, a good number enjoyed the lights and sights. Mr & Mrs Claus had a warm welcome for everyone at the hall, as hotdogs, hot drinks and goodies were gobbled up. The children took their turn making their requests to the Man in Red, followed by a festive program presented by the Rec. Committee. Congratulations to the LCBO on winning people's choice for favourite float with their entry decorated in gingerbread and sweets.    North Frontenac The North Frontenac Christmas parade took place on November 29, starting at the township offices in Plavna and finishing at the Ompah hall. Photos courtesy of Michelle Ross. At right: the Plevna Pioneer Club’s float proclaims “Jesus is the sweetest gift”. ton Cottages float

Ten years later, 9-1-1 is a part of life.

It was ten years ago this week that 911 service was introduced in North and Central Frontenac and upgraded in Kingston and South Frontenac, tying civic address numbers to land line phone numbers in all of Frontenac County for seamless dispatch of fire, ambulance and police service throughout the county. The ceremony marking the launch of the service took place on December 8, 2004 at the North Frontenac Telephone Company office, which had become the central meeting point for the 16 key volunteers, municipal and EMS personnel who had been working on the 911 project, some of them for seven years. The project was in the early planning stages in the fall of 1997, months before the founding of North and Central Frontenac, and one of the first key pieces of information that was identified was the need for up to date mapping for the new townships. Marcel Giroux, who came on as chair of the 911 committee at that time, recalls that the only comprehensive mapping that was available then were the Ontario Base Maps. The problem was that those maps had not been updated for Frontenac County for decades. “The maps were dated from the early 1960s, and were pretty much useless for our purposes,” he said, when interviewed this week. “We pretty much had to start from scratch." The process suffered a few delays along the way, the first of which was the ice storm that greeted the newly amalgamated townships at the very start of 1998. The politicians and emergency services personnel, who put in countless hours dealing with the ice storm and its aftermath, would undoubtedly have benefited from all the mapping and Geographical Information Systems (GIS) that are available today, which are in many ways an off-shoot of the 911 process. As it was, it was local knowledge and chain saw-wielding road crews and volunteers who were relied upon to keep everyone safe and warm. Giroux approached the townships in the late spring of 1998 to get them on board for the 911 system. Two people were sought from each of the seven former townships that made up the two new townships to do the hard work of identifying each of the over 8,000 properties on over 200 public roads and 400 private lanes within the two townships. The people who took this on were: Dick Hook and Bill Rowsome (Barrie), Dave and Nancy Smith (Clar-Mill) Colonial and Annette St. Pierre (Palmerston/Canonto), Marsden Kirk and Jack Nicolson (Kennebec), Faye Putnam and Elva Price (Olden), Gord Whan and Luc Salvador (Oso), and Lloyd Lee and Dave Hansen (Hinchinbrooke). Gleva Lemke took on the role of secretary of the 911 committee, with Marcel Giroux being the 16th member. “One of the big jobs for the committee members was to sort out all the roads in their own districts and match them with the maps. There were roads with no names, names with no roads, roads with more than one name, and names that appeared on a number of roads,” said Giroux. CGIS of Perth was contracted to develop brand new maps for the 911 project, beginning the process that has resulted, 15 years later, in comprehensive paper and electronic mapping covering all corners of Frontenac County. Exact locations of properties and buildings are now just a click away on a computer or smart phone. The 911 process continued for three years, and by the end of 2001, all properties had been identified and civic addressing was in place. It was time to wait for Bell Canada to do some internal work to prepare for the 911 switch over. In the meantime, the townships jointly hired Chris Matheson as 911 co-ordinator, in order to bring the project to its fruition and to provide the kind of support that the project would continue to require even after its launch. New properties would need to be added to the data base and the system would need to be upgraded over time. Matheson was later hired on as the full time IT (Information Technology) person for Central Frontenac and a similar position was created in North Frontenac, in recognition of the role that electronic information and GIS plays in the current workings of municipalities. Matheson, who now works for the City of Kingston as a systems analyst, recalls the 911 project fondly. “It was a good project to work on, particularly because of all the work that the volunteers did right up until the very end, matching phone numbers with addresses. We needed 98% of them assured for Bell to go ahead with it, and they made it happen,” he said. Marcel Giroux is still a little upset over a decision that Bell Canada made to delay the launch of 911 in Central and North Frontenac until South Frontenac and Kingston were ready for 911 enhanced. A process that was supposed to take a few months ended up taking twice as long. “I don't know if it cost anyone their lives or anything waiting the extra 18 months, but it did bother me at the time,” he said. When the system was brought on stream, the volunteers and emergency personnel were all smiles, celebrating the new millennium in Frontenac County. As 911 moves forward, hooking up GPS systems in cell phones with on-board computers in ambulances, police cars, even fire trucks, will make the service stronger yet as cell service penetrates the far reaches of the County. It's all a far cry from 1997, when there were not even reasonable paper maps of Frontenac County.

Frontenac Stewardship Foundation sees collaboration as its way forward

Much like some of the animals, plants and watersheds that it is devoted to protecting and fostering, the Frontenac Stewardship Foundation (FSF) has had to evolve quickly in order to survive in a changing environment. In its case that environment has not been a natural one, but a bureaucratic and financial one. The foundation began its life in the 1990s as the Frontenac Stewardship Council, a creation of the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources (MNR). The ministry was pulling its own staff out of some of the educational and stewardship work it had been involved with, and turning that over to volunteers from local communities. The stewardship councils, which were established in rural counties throughout Southern Ontario, were funded to the tune of $25,000 each year as seed money for stewardship projects, plus they had access to a full-time stewardship co-ordinator, an MNR employee who provided administrative support, access to ministry resources, and knowledge about and skills in obtaining grants from a variety of government and non-government sources. Over time, the Frontenac Stewardship Council became a meeting ground for enthusiasts from all four Frontenac townships, and sponsored workshops and various projects throughout the county, supporting lake associations as they developed lake plans, and supporting property owners interested in maintaining and improving their lands as habitat for a variety of species. About three years ago, the Ministry of Natural Resources, facing cuts to their own budget, cut its ties with the stewardship councils, pulling funding as well as staffing. The Frontenac Stewardship Council had set up a not-for profit charitable foundation years earlier in order to attract more funding and to be able to offer tax receipts, and when the ministry pulled out the Council morphed into the FSF. In the post-ministry era the FSF has continued to operate, and after its Annual General Meeting (AGM) on November 27, its president, Gord Rodgers, said he is more optimistic about the future of the foundation than he has been over the past 18 months. He points to a successful grant application for $5,000 towards public events from the Community Foundation of Kingston and Area, and the possibility of a grant from the Ontario Trillium Foundation, as well as an improving relationship with Frontenac County as reasons for optimism. He was also buoyed by the outcome of the AGM, which was a day-long event attended by representatives from a number of local and regional organizations that the FSF has been working with on stewardship project. Groups such as the Centre for Sustainable Watersheds, the Frontenac Arch Biosphere, stewardship council reps from across the region, as well as Frontenac County, represented by Warden Dennis Doyle, all talked about work they have been doing over the last few months. The foundation is planning to sponsor seminars in 2015 on the Cameron Bog, the Cataraqui wetland, and the Kennebec watershed, among others, and is hoping to embark on a major project on invasive species in Frontenac County. Also in the spring of 2015 a tall grass project, funded by Shell Canada, will get underway on a property on Wolfe Island. The project is aimed at improving habitat for Bobolinks on the island by re-introducing native grasses. The foundation has enough money to maintain a part-time employee, Bret Colman, who provides administrative support and fundraising and grant-writing expertise. Colman was at one-time a stewardship co-ordinator with the MNR and later was a resort owner in Frontenac County, which gives him a background in stewardship and commerce. At the AGM, a proposal was put forward for the foundation to undertake a comprehensive invasive species strategy in Frontenac County. The idea behind the strategy is to apply provincial strategies at a local level, always using communication and education as tools instead of calling for new regulations and restrictions. The foundation plans to engage a range of groups, in particular Frontenac County, to bring this about. An application has gone in to the MNR for a grant to use the Elbow Lake Environmental Centre in South Frontenac as the location of a pilot study for the strategy. Meeting with Kelly Pender Anne Marie Joe Alison, areas of mutual interest – sustainablity adivisory committee. Foundation - Meeting send list of attendees, same sort of thing as Elbow Lake, Senior guy from Nature Conservancy, Vickie Shlomka, Gwyneth, Leslie Rudy Kingston Foundation of Greater Kingston Given the discussions we hade. If we get grant from Trillium for invaxive species. A few dollars to run seminar serivce, feeling goos about it. We continue to get littl ebit of exposure, people sitting around table, still going . Dennis Doyle there for the whole day. Only one CA, RVCA. CSW Barb King, if we get money from Trillium get them going on invasive species. We want to set out an overall strategy for hte couty, work with otehr groups to get htem to deliver on the grouns stufd, signage and edsucationla material, material abailable from OFAH, work with lake associations delivering stuff on the ground. Will want to zero in on species that are relevant. Bret put together a strategy paper that he used to put our grant request to Trillium. The idea is money to support individual enough money to keep him with us. I don't know, he found out that we had put in a trillium grant for an invasive species thing, had discussions at three of our meetings. He's happy with the way Bret put invasive species together, happy about us pushing money for seminar series. ALICE idea, we need something to reach agricultural community. County-wide stewardship plan we gt to have smoethingont he grouns trhat we can show that we are doing things, asking for a million dollars in the bank for us. Work plan set up seminars and workshops with county, februar and aoril, Barry has a piece of property ion the island, iff trillium, pushing forward with the county. In kind, maybe GIS work. Invasive species, on behalf of Frontenac County, seminar series more formal Cataraqui wetland in the south. Cameron Bog. Kennebec wetlands, naturally signifigant, natural history, a major presentation north and south. Likely, three seminars. Agenda to be worked. Trillium. Lanark is hanging. Lennox and addington still around. Getting a few retired MNR people.

Frontenac Stewardship Foundation sees collaboration as its way forward

Much like some of the animals, plants and watersheds that it is devoted to protecting and fostering, the Frontenac Stewardship Foundation (FSF) has had to evolve quickly in order to survive in a changing environment. In its case that environment has not been a natural one, but a bureaucratic and financial one. The foundation began its life in the 1990s as the Frontenac Stewardship Council, a creation of the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources (MNR). The ministry was pulling its own staff out of some of the educational and stewardship work it had been involved with, and turning that over to volunteers from local communities. The stewardship councils, which were established in rural counties throughout Southern Ontario, were funded to the tune of $25,000 each year as seed money for stewardship projects, plus they had access to a full-time stewardship co-ordinator, an MNR employee who provided administrative support, access to ministry resources, and knowledge about and skills in obtaining grants from a variety of government and non-government sources. Over time, the Frontenac Stewardship Council became a meeting ground for enthusiasts from all four Frontenac townships, and sponsored workshops and various projects throughout the county, supporting lake associations as they developed lake plans, and supporting property owners interested in maintaining and improving their lands as habitat for a variety of species. About three years ago, the Ministry of Natural Resources, facing cuts to their own budget, cut its ties with the stewardship councils, pulling funding as well as staffing. The Frontenac Stewardship Council had set up a not-for profit charitable foundation years earlier in order to attract more funding and to be able to offer tax receipts, and when the ministry pulled out the Council morphed into the FSF. In the post-ministry era the FSF has continued to operate, and after its Annual General Meeting (AGM) on November 27, its president, Gord Rodgers, said he is more optimistic about the future of the foundation than he has been over the past 18 months. He points to a successful grant application for $5,000 towards public events from the Community Foundation of Kingston and Area, and the possibility of a grant from the Ontario Trillium Foundation, as well as an improving relationship with Frontenac County as reasons for optimism. He was also buoyed by the outcome of the AGM, which was a day-long event attended by representatives from a number of local and regional organizations that the FSF has been working with on stewardship project. Groups such as the Centre for Sustainable Watersheds, the Frontenac Arch Biosphere, stewardship council reps from across the region, as well as Frontenac County, represented by Warden Dennis Doyle, all talked about work they have been doing over the last few months. The foundation is planning to sponsor seminars in 2015 on the Cameron Bog, the Cataraqui wetland, and the Kennebec watershed, among others, and is hoping to embark on a major project on invasive species in Frontenac County. Also in the spring of 2015 a tall grass project, funded by Shell Canada, will get underway on a property on Wolfe Island. The project is aimed at improving habitat for Bobolinks on the island by re-introducing native grasses. The foundation has enough money to maintain a part-time employee, Bret Colman, who provides administrative support and fundraising and grant-writing expertise. Colman was at one-time a stewardship co-ordinator with the MNR and later was a resort owner in Frontenac County, which gives him a background in stewardship and commerce. At the AGM, a proposal was put forward for the foundation to undertake a comprehensive invasive species strategy in Frontenac County. The idea behind the strategy is to apply provincial strategies at a local level, always using communication and education as tools instead of calling for new regulations and restrictions. The foundation plans to engage a range of groups, in particular Frontenac County, to bring this about. An application has gone in to the MNR for a grant to use the Elbow Lake Environmental Centre in South Frontenac as the location of a pilot study for the strategy. Meeting with Kelly Pender Anne Marie Joe Alison, areas of mutual interest – sustainablity adivisory committee. Foundation - Meeting send list of attendees, same sort of thing as Elbow Lake, Senior guy from Nature Conservancy, Vickie Shlomka, Gwyneth, Leslie Rudy Kingston Foundation of Greater Kingston Given the discussions we hade. If we get grant from Trillium for invaxive species. A few dollars to run seminar serivce, feeling goos about it. We continue to get littl ebit of exposure, people sitting around table, still going . Dennis Doyle there for the whole day. Only one CA, RVCA. CSW Barb King, if we get money from Trillium get them going on invasive species. We want to set out an overall strategy for hte couty, work with otehr groups to get htem to deliver on the grouns stufd, signage and edsucationla material, material abailable from OFAH, work with lake associations delivering stuff on the ground. Will want to zero in on species that are relevant. Bret put together a strategy paper that he used to put our grant request to Trillium. The idea is money to support individual enough money to keep him with us. I don't know, he found out that we had put in a trillium grant for an invasive species thing, had discussions at three of our meetings. He's happy with the way Bret put invasive species together, happy about us pushing money for seminar series. ALICE idea, we need something to reach agricultural community. County-wide stewardship plan we gt to have smoethingont he grouns trhat we can show that we are doing things, asking for a million dollars in the bank for us. Work plan set up seminars and workshops with county, februar and aoril, Barry has a piece of property ion the island, iff trillium, pushing forward with the county. In kind, maybe GIS work. Invasive species, on behalf of Frontenac County, seminar series more formal Cataraqui wetland in the south. Cameron Bog. Kennebec wetlands, naturally signifigant, natural history, a major presentation north and south. Likely, three seminars. Agenda to be worked. Trillium. Lanark is hanging. Lennox and addington still around. Getting a few retired MNR people.

ADDINGTON HIGHLANDS NEWS

Hour of Code at NAEC

Hour of Code at NAEC

Submitted by NAEC On Dec. 12 at North Addington Education Centre, over one hundred elementary and secondary students with their teachers, participated in the Hour of Code. This is a global event that has people of all ages from over 180 countries write lines of code to promote c...

Kaladar OAHSS home declared mold free

Severe mold, later confirmed to be many times over safe limits, forced Danielle Pollard to vacate her home at Kaladar in late September, her young daughter in tow. This week, after a series of measures had been taken by the landlord, Ontario Aboriginal Housing Services (OAHS), the house has been given a clean bill of health as far as air quality is concerned, and Pollard is preparing to move back in. However there are a few loose ends. Much of her furniture, and all the mattresses in the house could not be successfully freed of mold and have been thrown out. “I asked them about my out of pocket costs for furniture and they told me that they had informed me when I moved in that I should obtain renter's insurance. I did that, but my renter's insurance does not cover damage due to mold. I'd say that is the responsibility of the landlord,” said Pollard. In an email to her from OAHS, a commitment was made to look at relief from rent and hydro payments that Pollard has made for October and November, but when she pointed out that her renter's insurance does not cover mold damage in an email to OAHS they did not respond. “I'm going to have to bring the financial matters to a Landord-Tenant Board tribunal,” said Pollard. Before moving back in, Pollard is checking all the household items to make sure they are mold-free and, with the help of her church, friends and neighbours, is working on replacing the household items she needs to be comfortable in the house. “I am a bit nervous about moving back in, because even with the inspection and the measures that have been taken to prevent mold from coming back, I still fear that it will come back, and where will I be then?” she said. Last year, Pollard left an OAHS house in Northbrook because of mold in the basement, only to find her Kaladar home filled with mold in September. OAHS Executive Director Don McBain, responded to a question about compensation for Danielle Pollard via email this week. “I have requested a report from our property management division on current discussions with the client” he said. There are 9 Ontario Aboriginal Housing Corporation homes in Addington Highlands, 13 in North Frontenac, 19 in Central Frontenac, 4 in South Frontenac, 3 in Westport, 4 in Tay Valley, and 22 in the Township of Rideau Lakes, making it one of the largest providers of rent-subsidised housing in the region. McBain said that of the 61 units listed above, 55 are currently occupied, 5 are being rehabilitated and prepared for new tenants, and one is in need of more major repairs, which will be undertaken next spring.

Addington Highlands Council

Luck of the draw sends Helen Yanch to L&A County Council In the run up to the municipal election, the probability that the deputy mayor/county representative position for the next four years would not be settled by the electorate was foreseen by the council. The way it works in Addington Highlands, the councilor who receives the most votes in the ward where the reeve does not reside is offered the position of deputy reeve and joins the reeve as a member of the eight- member Lennox and Addington County Council. Since it was likely that Henry Hogg, who resides in ward 1, would be re-elected, and the two candidates in ward 2 (Bill Cox and Helen Yanch) were acclaimed, a vote among the five-member council was a likely scenario, and a secret ballot is not permissible under the municipal act. Instead of subjecting themselves to a popularity contest to be played out in public, Bill Cox, who at that time was the deputy reeve, put forward a motion in early October that in the case of a tie, the matter be settled by lot. Both Yanch and Cox said they wanted the position, so on Monday afternoon (December 1) at the township office in Flinton, that's exactly what was done, although a plastic tub was used in place of a hat. Reeve Hogg pulled a piece of paper from the tub, unfolded it and read out the name, “Yanch”. This is Helen Yanch's second term as deputy reeve and county representative. She served in that role between 2006 and 2010. Kirby Thompson was also welcomed as a new representative from Ward 1, along with second term incumbent Tony Fritsch. Committee appointments – Council is considering whether to alter the roles of the waste management, public works, and recreation facilities committees. They decided to defer appointments to either committee until the next meeting while they consider their options. Other appointments were made – Kirby Thompson will sit on the Mississippi Valley Conservation Board; Henry Hogg will sit on the Quinte Region Conservation Board; and Bill Cox returns to the Pine Meadow Nursing Home Management Committee, which he now chairs. Helen Yanch and Kirby Thompson will sit as council representatives on the seven-member Addington Highlands Library Board; and Bill Cox, Henry Hogg and Kirby Thompson will sit on the Joint Fire Services Board with North Frontenac. Tony Fritsch remains the council-appointed manager of the Denbigh Community Centre (former schoolhouse). All members of council will sit on the Committee of Adjustment. Finally, Bill Cox was chosen to be the alternate to L&A County Council should the reeve or deputy reeve be unable to attend for any reason. Zamboni to be resurrected – Community members Dave Miles and Ron St. Peters appeared before Council to talk about the Zamboni that is parked in a shed near the Flinton ice rink. With the support of the Flinton Recreation Club, the two are proposing to have the Zamboni looked at to see if it can be put back in service without too much cost, and are willing to arrange training for volunteer drivers as well. “We are shy of taking ownership of the Zamboni,” said Councilor Bill Cox, but Council offered support for the initiative. Paul Isaacs proposes committees – Denbigh resident Paul Isaacs also appeared before Council to propose the formation of two new council committees, one to concern itself with the future of the Denbigh ambulance service, and a second on social issues. Council did not take immediate action on either proposal. Insurance premiums down - Paul Dorman from Jardine Lloyd Thompson Insurance Brokers (JLT), made his annual presentation about the township's insurance policy, which JLT is offering to renew for $$63,929, a slight decrease from last year’s premium $64,644. Council decided to renew the contract with JLT, but next year they will undertake a tendering process for insurance, which is required under their procurement bylaw. Township unhappy with proposed County Official Plan “We need to ask the county to make changes to the Official Plan before it is approved,” said Reeve Hogg. “I agree completely,” said Councilor Tony Fritsch. “My understanding was that it was not going to get into the detail that is covered in our Official Plan, but that's not what I see in the document.” “They said they would not duplicate what we have here, and would make it general, but as time went on they kept adding and adding to it,” said Councilor Bill Cox. One of the issues of concern to Addington Highlands is the plan’s insistence that development be concentrated within the boundaries of hamlets. OMPF grant – OMPF (Ontario Municipal Partnership Fund) is an annual grant from the provincial government directly to municipalities. In rural Ontario it is designed to compensate for the lack of commercial assessment, and costs related to distance from population centres. This year, Addington Highlands will be receiving $1,602,500 being an increase of $76,000 over last year. (see article on OMPF funding for the allocations in other townships and counties)

Land O' Lakes Seniors rock Pine Meadow Nursing Home

by Jean Brown Last week a large contingency of our Land O' Lakes Seniors visited two members at their home in Pine Meadow, notably Verna Cowdy and Betty Tarney, along with many other friends. Sharing laughs, telling hunting stories, and enjoying coffee made for a fun morning, in spite of the roaring snow outside. We donated funds to aid the Pine Meadow Family Council, whose mission is "to improve the quality of life for all residents by promoting an atmosphere of sensitivity, caring and support among staff, friends and family members of the residents." The Council supports the needs of staff and residents by offering fun and fundraising events that enable other events such as a steak BBQ for all residents, staff appreciation day, Christmas gifts for all residents, and much more. Pine Meadow is buzzing with excitement as Christmas approaches and as the new addition nears completion and folks move into their newly renovated rooms. Thanks one and all.

North Addington boys’ volleyball team qualifies for OFSAA

submitted by Joel Hasler For the first time in ten years, North Addington Education Centre is sending a team to OFSAA. The Senior Boys’ Volleyball team, coached by Mr. Hasler, will be travelling to Welland on Wednesday, November 19 to play in the OFSAA Single “A” Volleyball Championship. Our games will be played on Thursday, November 20 and Friday, November 21. The Senior Boys’ Volleyball team qualified for OFSAA after earning a silver medal at COSSA in Port Hope last Thursday. The team’s success demonstrates the nearly three years of dedication from many of the team members and coaches. Not only does this team have a strong group of senior-aged players, the team is privileged to have a great group of grade nine students. The future certainly looks bright for North Addington volleyball teams.

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