A cozy, colorful “Culture Day” at the Grace Centre in Sydenham

A cozy, colorful “Culture Day” at the Grace Centre in Sydenham

Written By: Julie Druker | Published: October-02-2014 | Category: SOUTH FRONTENAC
Tagged Under: Sydenham, Grace Centre, Arts & Culture

There is nothing better to get one into the spirit of fall with the vibrant colours and the cool temperatures it brings than a show of finely made, hand-crafted textiles. That was the case at the Sout...

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The North Frontenac election is ... odd and unsettling

The North Frontenac election is ... odd and unsettling

Written By: Jeff Green | Published: October-02-2014 | Category: Municipal Elections 2014
Tagged Under:

There is no way to get around the heavy hearts that are contesting the municipal election in North Frontenac in 2014. In his almost four years as mayor, Bud Clayton, an unknown quantity at the start ...

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Ilana Landsberg-Lewis inspires grandmothers groups in Verona

Ilana Landsberg-Lewis inspires grandmothers groups in Verona

Ilana Landsberg-Lewis, the daughter of Stephen Lewis and co-founder and executive director of the Stephen Lewis Foundation, inspired listeners at an information session that took place at Trinity Unit...

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The Poppy Campaign

The Poppy Campaign

Written By: News Staff | Published: October-02-2014 | Category: CENTRAL FRONTENAC
Tagged Under: Sharbot Lake, Community Clubs, Legion

By Connie McLellan Every year from the last Friday in October to Remembrance Day on November 11, the Legion conducts the “Poppy Campaign”. Canadians have donated money to support the services we prov...

...

Faces you can trust at Land O' Lakes PS

Faces you can trust at Land O' Lakes PS

Grade 7 and 8 students at Land O' Lakes Public School had a chance to break the ice while also learning how to trust one another during their first few weeks back at school. In a special art project,...

...

Remembering Terry Fox at GREC

At a special school-wide assembly on September 25 at Granite Ridge Education Centre in Sharbot Lake,...

Remembering Tristin, Tennessee-style

On Sept. 27, family, friends and supporters of the Tristin Osborne Memorial Scholarship Fund and the...

North Frontenac Back Roads Studio Tour

Participants on the North Frontenac Back Roads Studio Tour, which centred around the Plevna area, we...

Roaring Reptiles & Mighty Machines

Families and children from the community enjoyed a Saturday of fun on Sept. 20 at the Child Centre i...

“On no, not Again”- English-style music hall comedy in Bellrock

Fans of old-style English music hall humour are sure to enjoy an evening of skits, songs and dance c...

Frontenac County Official Plan – squeezed from both ends

A dispute between Frontenac County Planner Joe Gallivan and South Frontenac Planner Lindsay Mills wa...

Three FPS Paramedics recognized by Ontario Association of Paramedic Chiefs

In a formal ceremony at last week’s Ontario Association of Paramedic Chiefs’ Awards Gala, two Fronte...

Honoring Lucy Maud Montgomery in Sydenham

As part of their programming titled "Home Town Home Front: Kingston Frontenac in World War 1", the K...

"Last Spike" driven in Battersea

Last weekend the Frontenac Society of Model Engineers (FSME) held a "Golden Spike" ceremony as they ...

Outdoor Chili Fest - a hit in Sydenham

On September 22, in an effort to make their fundraising efforts visible and accessible to the local ...

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CENTRAL FRONTENAC

Mighty Fine Fair Weather

Photo: Enjoying the midway at Parham Fair. One way or another, all outdoor events are captive to the weather, and summer fairs are no excep...

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NORTH FRONTENAC

North Frontenac Council - July 17

Ompah fire hall/ambulance project officially dead The joint North Frontenac/Frontenac County building project, which was to bring an ambula...

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NORTH FRONTENAC

North Frontenac Council - Aug 11/14

Ompah fire hall renovations to cost $300,000 If all goes well, North Frontenac Council will not have to concern itself with the future of t...

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NORTH FRONTENAC NEWS

North Frontenac Council - Apr 29/14

North Frontenac Council - Apr 29/14

North Frontenac passes budget amid looming OPP cost crisis After several months of budget-crunching sessions between staff and council, North Frontenac managed to square the circle - almost, coming up with a 2014 budget that established a reserve for long-term infrastructure whi...

North Frontenac Council - Apr 8/14

North Frontenac tax levy to go up by 3% Most of increase devoted to long-term needs While the levy to ratepayers in North Frontenac is going up by 3% this year, the operating budgets of township departments have been trimmed. As part of the asset management strategy that Council took on late last year, North Frontenac has set aside 2% of the money they raise from taxation to put in a fund to cover replacement costs for all roads, bridges and buildings that the township owns. That left a tax increase for township operations of $53,214 (1.06%), even as a number of fixed costs went up. “There was some new spending, including $15,000 as part of our doctor recruitment commitment for the Lakelands Health Team and $54,000 for playground equipment, which will only be spent if we get a grant that we have applied for,” said township Chief Administrative Officer Cheryl Robson. “In order to keep from a larger increase in the levy each department was asked to find cuts, which they did. There were no cuts to service, but it will be a lean year this year.” The township's draft budget, which will include a total levy of $5.2 million to North Frontenac ratepayers, was approved in principle at a meeting of council on Monday (April 7) and will be presented for public comment at the beginning of the next council meeting on April 28. It is anticipated that the budget document will be approved by bylaw at that time. The two other components of the tax bill that goes to North Frontenac ratepayers, county and education taxes, are each up by about $35,000 this year, for a total increase of $125,000 to be split among all the township's ratepayers. Pine Lake It's been almost eight years since members of the Ardoch Algonquin First Nation occupied a piece of public land adjacent to a boat launch at Pine Lake, off Ardoch Road. The small property, which is managed by the Ministry of Natural Resources, (MNR) has continued to be used as a boat launch and there is a small road running over it between Ardoch Road and the lake. Back in 2006, the Ardoch Algonquins asserted an Aboriginal claim to the property by cutting trees and putting up a portable metal building. Their stated intention was to establish a band office on the property. But nothing has happened on the property for a number of years, except that brush has grown where the trees had been cleared. The portable building has remained but has not been used at all. In February, the township authorized CAO Cheryl Robson to write the MNR asking that the portable be removed. “Council requests that MNR remove this derelict portable from this property, at your earliest possible convenience,” said Cheryl Robson in a letter to Michael Gatt of the Bancroft ministry office. Last week a letter of response came from Suzy Shalla, Resources Management Supervisor in Bancroft. “I did want to respond to thank you and the Council for bringing forward your concerns regarding the structure located near the boat launch at Pine Lake. MNR is aware of the structure that is located there, however we will not be pursuing removal of the building at this time.” Township office remediation update - Township staff remain housed in portable offices as well as a temporary office in the Clar-Mill fire hall as Service Master and Concord Engineering continue to work on the heating oil spill that took place in early February. Council received a report from Concord Engineering which says that there is no evidence that the ground under the building has been contaminated, but a number of walls and some flooring has been removed as part of ongoing clean-up efforts. There is no time frame for the completion of repairs, which are all covered by the township's insurance policy. Ompah fire hall and community hall back to square one Council soundly rejected two proposals for upgrades to the Ompah fire hall/community hall property. The first proposal, which came in response to a tender for repairs and upgrades, would have cost $360,000. It was supported by Councilor John Inglis and rejected by the rest of Council. The second proposal, which was put forward by Councillor Wayne Good, would have capped spending on upgrades at $50,000, inclusive of a $10,000 accessibility expenditures that is mandated by the Province of Ontario. Although Council has put aside over $200,000 for the project, Good wanted to redirect that money to build a new township office. Good pointed out that there is only one trained firefighter living within a 5 km radius of the hall, and a limited capacity hall would serve the community needs. His proposal was supported by himself, and no one else. Councilor Betty Hunter then proposed that $180,000 be spent on the hall, and that the Ompah fire hall task force, which came up with the proposal that led to the $360,000 tender, be brought back together to figure out how to spend only $180,000 on the building, and do so this year. Her motion was accepted. An additional $50,000 has been pledged by the Ompah volunteers, and there remains an additional $10,000 available for accessibility features.

North Frontenac Council Feb. 3

Septic re-inspection program Ed Gardiner, from Kingston Frontenac Lennox and Addington Public Health, made a proposal to council for a mandatory septic re-inspection program. Until now the township has been contracting with the Mississippi-Rideau Septic System office for a voluntary program. But each of the last two years the number of systems inspected has lagged below the target because a number of landowners have been unresponsive to repeated attempts to engage them in a re-inspection. Changes to Ontario legislation have permitted municipalities to engage in mandatory programs if they choose to do so. One of the stipulations is that the re-inspections be done by the same agency that is responsible for approvals to new septic systems. In the case of North Frontenac that agency is KFL&A Public Health. Gardiner said that it would cost the township $12,000 per year for the health unit to complete 160 inspections, with a focus on inspecting high risk systems, properties with no record of approved sewage systems, or properties with systems that are over 20 years old. He said that the program would be run out of the KFL&A office in Cloyne and that inspection reports would be sent to the landowner and the township. As far as enforcement is concerned Ed Gardiner said that if a report says remedial action is required, “a reasonable amount of time, determined by the township chief building official,” should be given. “If no action is taken the chief building official or the inspector will issue an order to comply,” he said. The township has now received two proposals, one from Mississippi-Rideau and one from KFL&A Public Health. In order to proceed they will have to choose one or the other to do all of their inspection work, on new and old systems. Planner ready to go to the OMB if necessary Joe Gallivan, the planner for Frontenac County, presented the second draft of the Frontenac County Official Plan to Council. Gallivan said the plan, which sets out a policy framework and leaves most of the detailed information to the township plan, has been submitted to the Ministry of Municipal Affairs for comment. Based on the response of the ministry to the Renfrew County Official Plan, and the North Frontenac Official Plan, Gallivan said he is concerned about how the ministry will likely respond to the approach the county is taking. “Frankly I'm not that optimistic at this point. It might be that we end up with an OMB challenge on this.” Two issues are of major concern to Gallivan, and to North Frontenac, who are at an impasse with the ministry with their own plan. One is the ministry position that no new development shall be permitted on private roads, even if there are strong rules in place about the quality and width of those roads. The other deals with the ministry's insistence that development be oriented to hamlets and villages, “which is totally contrary to the demand for development on the ground in places like Frontenac County,” Gallivan said. Construction up in 2013 Building permits were issued for over $7.3 million worth of construction in 2013, including six new inland and 20 new waterfront residences. The total for 2012 was $6.3 million. Mayor talks about County Mayor Clayton, who is also the Warden of Frontenac County, said he remains frustrated about the county budget process. “I still feel there is some push back from some of the managers at the county. When we ask them to make cuts they come back with reasons why it is impossible to make any. All we are asking of the two major programs, Fairmount Home and land ambulance, is that they bring costs to the average of costs among services of comparative size, instead of above the average. I think the administration of both programs could be a bit top-heavy,” he said. In summing up a strategic planning session, Clayton said, “There is an expression that goes 'if the people won't change, change the people'. There may be something that needs to happen like that.” War memorial funding frustration Councilor Gerry Martin has been chairing a task force that has been developing a proposal for a war memorial in the township for the past year. The task force was planning to submit an application for funding to the Community War Memorial Program, a five-year granting program administered by Veterans' Affairs Canada that was set to run until 2015. However, when the task force contacted Veterans' Affairs in January, seeking an application form for the program, they received the response that “unfortunately the Community War Memorial Program is no longer accepting funding applications due to higher than anticipated demand.” Martin prepared a letter to MP Scott Reid asking for his assistance in dealing with Veterans' Affairs on the matter. Council approved the letter.

Clayton Doubtful in North Frontenac

“I don't know yet,” said Bud Clayton when asked if he was planning to seek re-election as mayor of North Frontenac after one four-year term. “If things remain the way they are now, I would say it would be no, but things can change.” Clayton added that he had not planed to run during the last election in 2010, but decided at the last minute to give former Deputy Mayor Jim Beam a run for his money since there were no other candidates coming forward. He ended up winning. “I don't want to hang on past my best-before date,” Clayton said this week, “but I have not made a final decision by any means.” Gutowski leaning towards running in Central Frontenac “In all likelihood I will be running,” two-time incumbent Janet Gutowski said when asked if she was going to run for a third term as mayor of Central Frontenac. “I'm very committed to this township and I think there is still a lot to be accomplished,” she said. Among the issues that Gutowski will be addressing during the election year are seniors’ housing and the future of service delivery in Central Frontenac. “I can see us seeking partnerships with other townships and a continued role for Frontenac County as well,” she said. “Provincial policies are always impacting us as a township, and the City of Kingston has an impact on our residents on a daily basis because they run our social services. It is only through the county that we can even talk to them; there is no other venue.”

North Frontenac Council - Dec. 17/13

North Frontenac pulls back from hall redundancy. After meeting with user groups from the Snow Road, Harlowe, and Clarendon and Miller halls, North Frontenac Council decided to rescind part of a bylaw they passed last July, which stipulated that the halls were to be declared as surplus property in the future. Mayor Clayton had maintained that declaring the halls surplus did not necessarily mean they would be closing, only that they would no longer be in line for re-building at the end of their useful life. However, he has also talked about a township preference for building a single, central hall and township office. Councilors have been hearing from hall users ever since the bylaw was passed in July, and at their meeting the clause about declaring the halls surplus was removed. Asset management plan finalized Vicki Leakey, from KPMG, presented the final version of the North Frontenac Asset Management Plan to council. Municipalities in Ontario are required to have these plans in place if they are to be eligible for provincial infrastructure grants next year. Some municipalities have produced basic documents that were created by sending data to a consulting firm and receiving a template-based document back. In North Frontenac's case, KPMG has met extensively with staff and council and the plan has been under development all year. The North Frontenac plan encompasses paved roads, bridges, equipment, and all township-owned buildings. Next year information about gravel roads will be added. Leakey's report concludes, as she told council last month when presenting a draft, that the township has done a good job of investing in infrastructure needs over the last 10 years, and by parceling off an added 2% in taxation towards infrastructure spending into the future, they will come closer to keeping up with the requirement for rebuilding roads, bridges, equipment, and buildings as they age and need to be replaced. Leakey costed out the rebuilding at $7.5 million. “There is not a municipality in Ontario that is not falling behind, at least to some extent, and North Frontenac is probably doing better than most,” Leakey said. One factor that is not in North Frontenac's favour is its negative growth rate, which among other things, means less money is available from property taxes. The report presented it in stark terms. “While the province's population increased by 19.5% between 1996 and 2011, North Frontenac's population dropped by 3.9%.” And those who remain in North Frontenac are ageing. Thirty-nine percent of the total personal income among township residents is derived from pensions, while the provincial average is 14%. “The greater reliance on fixed income pension reduces the ability of the municipality to raise funds through taxation,” said Leakey's report. OPP billing questions The township supported efforts by other municipalities to scuttle a proposed new billing system for OPP services that would see the township charged on a per household basis, including seasonal as well as permanent residents. Township staff calculate this would bring the North Frontenac bill from $205,000 to $1.15 million - a 458% increase. “It's funny how they bill us for the seasonal residents but when it comes to grants they look only at our permanent residents,” said Mayor Clayton. “They like to play both sides of the coin.”

CENTRAL FRONTENAC NEWS

The Poppy Campaign

The Poppy Campaign

By Connie McLellan Every year from the last Friday in October to Remembrance Day on November 11, the Legion conducts the “Poppy Campaign”. Canadians have donated money to support the services we provide and to clearly show their recognition of the debt owed to so many Canadians ...

Faces you can trust at Land O' Lakes PS

Grade 7 and 8 students at Land O' Lakes Public School had a chance to break the ice while also learning how to trust one another during their first few weeks back at school. In a special art project, students made plaster casts of their faces, which involved putting themselves into a vulnerable position. The students chose groups and each student in the group had the others make a negative mold of their face. This meant that each participant had to lie down and breathe out of straws while their peers covered their faces with plaster bandages. Once the molds were dried each student then made a positive cast from the original negative molds. The end result is 26 white plaster faces that now hang in the school’s main pod area and will be on display until Christmas. Their teacher, Mr. Hull, said that the project, which is part of the casting curriculum for the students, is also a great trust exercise. “It's a great opportunity for the students to learn about the positive and negative elements of casting, the chemical reactions that take place, concepts of volume, as well as learning to trust the partners in their group.” In addition to the mold making, students were asked to write biographies of themselves, which hang under their nameless faces. For many, the project was their first encounter with mold making, and it was also enjoyable for them because they had a chance to bond with their fellow students. Hull said it was the first time he did this particular mold making project with students and he felt it was a huge success. “I am always amazed at how well the students respond to these hands-on cooperative, creative projects. Not only did they do all of the work themselves but they also did a great job.” Hull said the project works particularly well with older students who have the maturity to deal with being able to stay still for an extended length of time while breathing through straws. Grade 8 student Leah-Anne said she “enjoyed the project and though having the plaster bandages on your face at first was a bit weird and at first scary, it was fun and interesting.” Grade 7 student Mariah said she also enjoyed the project and said it was her first time making a plaster face mask. The project is attracting the attention of other students in the school, who often try to guess which face belongs to whom.  

Remembering Terry Fox at GREC

At a special school-wide assembly on September 25 at Granite Ridge Education Centre in Sharbot Lake, students learned about the Canadian hero Terry Fox and his epic run across the country to raise funds for cancer research. Students watched a film about Fox, who was diagnosed with bone cancer in March 1977. He underwent surgery that left him with a prosthetic leg. On April 12, 1980 in St. John's, Newfoundland and after months of training, Fox set out on his Marathon of Hope to raise money for cancer research. He ran for 143 days though six Canadian provinces, averaging 42 kilometres a day for a total of 5373 kilometres, before finding out upon reaching Thunder Bay that the cancer had spread to his lungs. Terry then returned to British Colombia for treatment and sadly passed away on June 28, 1981 at the age of 22. His goal of every Canadian donating one loonie to the cause was not in vain and his Marathon of Hope inspired and rallied the nation to initiate and take part in annual runs and other events, which, as of May 2014, have raised over $650M for cancer research through the Terry Fox Foundation. Terry was the youngest recipient to receive the Companion of the Order of Canada and today, almost 35 years after his marathon began, he continues to inspire people from all over the world. GREC students Sam Kempe, Josh Keith, Bailey Merrigan, Tyee Davis, Emily Baillargeon, Leah Neumann, and Wyatt McVeigh spoke at the assembly, which was organized by educational assistant Cathy Reynolds, and each student read an excerpt from the journal Terry kept during his marathon. Prior to the event each student was asked to donate a loonie or toonie to the Terry Fox Foundation and after the coins were counted the school had raised close to $400. Following the assembly the students and staff ran or walked the outdoor track at the school and on the following Monday Ms. Schall's grade eight class was awarded a prize for raising the most money for the event.  

Roaring Reptiles & Mighty Machines

Families and children from the community enjoyed a Saturday of fun on Sept. 20 at the Child Centre in Sharbot Lake at their annual Mighty Machines and Roaring Reptiles event. Community Living-North Frontenac partnered with Northern Frontenac Community Services to sponsor the event, which included a free barbeque lunch, arts and crafts activities, and an interactive display of trucks and vehicles for children to explore from different businesses and organizations in the community. Colin Efford of Ray's Reptiles was a huge draw and he presented numerous creatures to a captivated audience of children who had a chance to get up close and learn more about snakes, turtles, lizards and many other exotic creatures. The event also included a yard sale for the United Way. It was a busy day and before noon already 60 guests were on site enjoying the free activities and food. Hats off to all the organizers, volunteers and staff. 

Bill Snider Honoured In Memorium at Picadilly Cemetery

The weather cleared just a bit and a warm front broke through the early fall chill at the Piccadilly cemetery on Tuesday afternoon, Sept. 23. Before holding one of the final council meetings of the term in the nearby hall, members of council and staff of Central Frontenac Township joined with the family of the late Bill Snyder to dedicate a bench in his honour. Mayor Janet Gutowski spoke of the legacy left by Snyder, who died in February while still a member of Council, a position he held for 35 years. “Bill was dedicated to Hinchinbrooke and Central Frontenac Township and his beloved Piccadilly area. Bill was tenacious when he wanted to get things done, and he insisted that things were done properly. We won't see another like him,” she said. A moment of silence was held to mark the occasion, then everyone walked slowly to the Piccadilly hall to carry on the business of the township.

SOUTH FRONTENAC NEWS

A cozy, colorful “Culture Day” at the Grace Centre in Sydenham

A cozy, colorful “Culture Day” at the Grace Centre in Sydenham

There is nothing better to get one into the spirit of fall with the vibrant colours and the cool temperatures it brings than a show of finely made, hand-crafted textiles. That was the case at the Southern Frontenac Community Services Grace Centre for a one-day show titled Textile...

Ilana Landsberg-Lewis inspires grandmothers groups in Verona

Ilana Landsberg-Lewis, the daughter of Stephen Lewis and co-founder and executive director of the Stephen Lewis Foundation, inspired listeners at an information session that took place at Trinity United church in Verona on September 27. She was joined by Graham Coultas, director of the Grandmothers to Grandmothers Campaign, which since its inception in 2006 has seen more than 240 grandmother groups form across the country. New groups are still forming all over the world and fundraising efforts to date have reached $21 million. The money has gone directly to grassroots organizations run by and for African grandmothers, who have been left to single handedly support and care for millions of African children orphaned by the HIV/AIDS pandemic. The Verona event attracted members from the local Grandmothers-by-the-Lake chapter as well as members from grandmothers groups in Belleville, Kingston, and Quinte. Landsberg-Lewis, who is a labour and human rights lawyer and who actively advocates for the rights of women, is someone who understands first hand the challenges facing African grandmother groups. Her in-depth understanding stems in part from her eight years working at the United Nations Development Fund for Women (UNIFEM) where she worked as an advisor for the Convention to Eliminate All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW). She has traveled the world assisting grassroots women’s groups to stop female genital mutilation as well as other forms of violence and discrimination. The session in Verona included the screening of a new film put out by the Stephen Lewis Foundation titled “African Grandmothers Tribunal; Seeking Justice at the Frontlines of the AIDS Crisis”. The documentary was made at a tribunal, which took place in British Columbia in September 2013, and where six African grandmothers spoke of the specific challenges that face them. The film has been shown to three Canadian grandmothers groups and next month will be made available from the SLF as part of the kit so that other grandmothers groups worldwide can see first hand the importance of the fundraising work they do. The information gleaned from the tribunal was made into a special report that says, “It’s time to recognize that African grandmothers at the forefront of the HIV and AIDS crisis must have their human rights respected and protected.” At her talk in Verona, Landsberg-Lewis highlighted how far the African grandmothers have come in just eight years as well the shift that is now taking place in their fight. “There is a new dimension of the work that is unfolding right now. The African grandmothers are beginning to work and advocate for their own human rights while continuing to care for the orphans and trying to sustain the communities that support them”, she said. She also said that on the one hand, while so much has been achieved in the last eight years, there is not only an excitement but also a legitimate fear at this time. “The fear is that just at the moment when things are beginning to turn around, the international community will walk away too soon and the betrayal of Africa will continue and deepen. That would be a tragedy of epic proportions given how much these African grandmothers and their communities have not only risen to that challenge, but have transcended it beyond belief.” Landsberg-Lewis became visibly moved during her talk and later explained, “On the one hand you feel outrage at the injustice of it all but on the other hand it is also very moving to watch the triumph of the human spirit over such adversity in this way. It's very, very powerful.” Adele Colby, chair of Grandmothers-by-the-Lake group, was thrilled to host Landberg-Lewis in Verona. “Getting her here was a coup. She is the heart and soul of the Grandmothers’ Campaign and is the one who has all the knowledge and also feels so passionately about it.” I will leave the last word here with the African grandmothers themselves who addressed the 2103 Tribunal in Vancouver. Only they can say best what exactly they want and need in their fight to sustain the millions of orphaned children in their care and the communities that support them. The following is a excerpt from the report as given on the website of the Stephen Lewis Foundation. “It’s time to support our organizations fully, and put systems in place to address our needs and the needs of the children in our care....It’s time to recognize our contribution to the survival of our communities, and the expertise we have developed to do so, by giving us our rightful place and voice wherever decisions are being made. We will not let the AIDS pandemic defeat us, nor destroy our communities, but we cannot prevail alone.” To find out more and/or to see a trailer for the film, visit www.stephenlewisfoundation.org and www.grandmotherscampaign.org  

Remembering Tristin, Tennessee-style

On Sept. 27, family, friends and supporters of the Tristin Osborne Memorial Scholarship Fund and the Limestone Learning Foundation (LLF) celebrated at a special Tennessee-style gala fundraiser at Carol Bisaillon's and Daryl Martin's Dreamcatcher Farms near Sunbury. Long-time Tennessee natives Greg and Valerie Heinike, owners of the Bell Buckle Café in Tennessee, traveled to Sunbury with some of their staff to prepare a Tennessee-style evening of dining for the event, which was attended by over 200 guests, many sporting cowboy boots and hats. Kingston radio hosts Rick Choma and Lisa Ray were the emcees and musical entertainment was provided by numerous talented guests, including Grammy nominee Valerie Smith, the Abrams Brothers and Rudy and Saddle Up. Tristin Osborne was a former KCVI graduate who despite a learning disability went on to pursue a post-secondary degree in teaching at Aurora College in Yellowknife. Tragically she passed away in her sleep in 2004, just two months before graduating. Following Tristin’s death her mother Judy and father John created a memorial fund to honour her and help students with learning disabilities. Through the fund, a scholarship award is presented annually to a graduating student from the Limestone District School Board who is interested in furthering their education and overcoming the challenges posed by a learning disability. The memorial gala is the second time the Osbornes have teamed up with the LLF to put on the fundraiser. For several years the Osbornes held the annual TOMM Fest, a music-festival styled fundraiser in Tristin's honour, which has been replaced by the combined LLF fundraiser at Dreamcatcher Farms. In remembering her daughter, Judy Osborne said she was “a very bright, darling little girl who strived to overcome her disabilities so that she could ‘come to better understand students who are learning-disabled and help them to reach their goals.’” Judy said she was “a peace lover who could never do enough for others” and said she worked extra shifts while studying in Yellowknife to support others in need in that community. Tristin received her teaching degree from the college posthumously and today her legacy continues to support learning-disabled students pursuing post secondary studies.

“On no, not Again”- English-style music hall comedy in Bellrock

Fans of old-style English music hall humour are sure to enjoy an evening of skits, songs and dance courtesy of the five-member cast of “On No, Not Again”. The play, a collection of comedic pieces, is the brain child of long-time pals Dick Miller and Peter Lovett, who have been acting together for over 14 years. The two wrote and directed the play, which is actually now in its fourth installment. The original was formulated seven years ago and has been put on for audiences in Kingston and also at the Selby Theatre. The skits include many clever costume changes, which I will not reveal here, and which form the basis for some very entertaining sight gags, racy conversations and classic old-school English shenanigans. Both Miller and Lovett are stage chameleons of sorts, as comfortable sporting their talents as Elvis tribute artists as they are bundled up and bonneted in cotton onesies or boasting black and white habits. The two gentlemen's antics are buoyed by their two female counterparts, Miller's daughter Lisa Wilberforce and her long time acting pal Julia McKay, who have also worked together before onstage. Some of their primo offerings include a funny musical take on Canadian nationalism, a new and interesting way of cementing the nine times table and some top notch musical faves that they perform with aplomb. And we cannot forget the lovely and talented Sandy Turcotte, who plays a hard to please accompanist. She also has some very powerful vocal stylings of her own and caustic one-liners to add into the mix. The evening includes one intermission and Miller describes the show as “ a fast-paced evening of entertainment that will keep people laughing.” Comedy is one of the toughest of stage genres to nail and timing is of course of the essence. Both male and female leads were able to work on their parts independently of the others before bringing them together in five weeks of final rehearsals, which made for a night of seamless back-to-back fun. The actors’ wives, Jan and Debbie, work hard behind the scenes on costumes, props and sets and behind the lights are Howard and Lynne Hutcheson. For those who missed this weekend’s performances, the show continues on with three more: Friday & Saturday, Oct. 3 & 4 at 7:30 pm and Sunday, Oct. 5 at 2 pm at the Schoolhouse Theatre in Bellrock.

Frontenac County Official Plan – squeezed from both ends

A dispute between Frontenac County Planner Joe Gallivan and South Frontenac Planner Lindsay Mills was played out once again on Monday night (September 22) at the Verona Lions Hall.The occasion was the official public meeting on the third, and presumably final, draft of the Frontenac County Official Plan (OP), which is slated for a final vote by Frontenac County Council on October 15.The issues raised by Mills, and supported by members of South Frontenac Council and Mayor Gary Davison, centre on specific wording in some of the clauses in the document.Once passed, and approved by the Ministry of Municipal Affairs, the County OP will be the background document to which all of the local township plans will need to conform.This represents a change from current practice, wherein the local OPs are approved directly by the Ontario Ministry of Municipal Affairs, an arrangement that has been frustrating to many local councils, because itleads to delays, and the ministry is seen as being unyielding and too intent on imposing urban planning reality onto rural Ontario.The reason this is such an issue for the county, the townships and residents, is that the County and township OPs are fundamental documents that ultimately determine the kinds of residential and commercial developmentthat will be permitted, in which locations, and under what conditions.At the meeting in Verona, there were environmentalists, developers, and homeowners in attendance. Almost 100 people were there, and not because of the entertainment value of planning talk, but because of the ultimate implications for the future of Frontenac County.Lindsay Mills’ concerns with the third draft are the same as they were with both of the previous drafts. “The document is too detailed and intrudes into local planning responsibilities in many areas,” Mills wrote.A prime example of this is the statement in the document that waterfront development be subject to a 30 metre setback from the shoreline.This is a concept that has been entrenched in the South Frontenac Plan since 2003, so there would seem to be no problem. However, Mills said that in the South Frontenac plan the setback is a norm; it can be altered with the permission of the township’s committee of adjustment.“By making it a requirement in the County OP, there will be no more leeway for circumstances where the setback is too restrictive,” Mills said.He also said that in some cases the wording in the document is vague and could ultimately be open to much interpretation.If Joe Gallivan only had to work out his differences with Lindsay Mills and South Frontenac Council, he might be able to. However when the plan was sent to the Ministry of Municipal Affairs for comment, the ministry suggested a number of changes. Some of them are easy enough to accommodate, but others would make the county plan more prescriptive than it already is.This puts Gallivan, and the county, into a difficult position. South Frontenac will oppose the plan unless Gallivan pulls back the detailed, prescriptive language in the plan, and the ministry will not approve it if hedoes not add more restrictions. This reality was noted by Lindsay Mills in his comments, but that did not convince him to alter his demands.Through it all, Joe Gallivan remains optimistic about prospects for the document to be approved by the County in October and for the ministry to look favourably on it in the end. He said that if the ministry does not yield in the end, the county can appeal to the Ontario Municipal Board, and he said he is confident the county’s arguments will stand up.The public meeting leaves a number of questions unanswered. Given everything that has happened, it is unlikely that the mayor of South Frontenac will support the County OP on October 15. The County may approve it anyway because there are likely enough councilors who will support it for it to pass. The ministry, in spite of Joe Gallivan’s optimism, will likely demand further changes, which will lead to an OMB hearing.That is when the opposition from South Frontenac will become a real problem for Frontenac County. The County needs to present a united front to the OMB in order to win an appeal. The trouble is, there is no sense that an accommodation between Frontenac County and South Frontenac is any closer now than it was after the earlier drafts of the OP were tabled.

FRONTENAC COUNTY NEWS

Three FPS Paramedics recognized by Ontario Association of Paramedic Chiefs

Three FPS Paramedics recognized by Ontario Association of Paramedic Chiefs

In a formal ceremony at last week’s Ontario Association of Paramedic Chiefs’ Awards Gala, two Frontenac Paramedic Service paramedics received the Governor General’s Emergency Medical Services Exemplary Service Medal, and a third received the McNally Award of Bravery. “I am very ...

Reno Rescue seeking stalled cottage renovations

If you are a cottage owner and a crackerjack carpenter to boot, skip this article. If, however, you are a cottage owner who is a bit DIY-challenged, there may be a reality show starring role in your future. Mountain Road Productions, an Ottawa-based TV production company that produces shows with a home renovation theme, among others, is casting for a new cottage renovation series for Cottage Life Television. The show is called Reno Rescue and is filming later this fall. Reno Rescue features carpenter Dave Depencier, who will bring his team to cottages with disaster reno projects that are going nowhere fast and turn them into “a little piece of cottage perfection” while teaching skills to the not-so-handy homeowner along the way. To apply to be featured on the show, eligible cottagers must send interior and exterior photos of their cottage, a photo of themselves and their loved ones, a brief written description of their renovation situation, and their contact information to

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Those who are chosen will be required to invest $2,000 into their renewed renovation, but all the rest of the labour and materials will be covered by the show. According to the Margaret Robitaille at Mountain Road, one of the features the show will be looking at is the relationship between the homeowners. The one partner who has undertaken the stalled reno will stay on and work with Dave Depencier, and the other, long-suffering partner will go off for a few days, returning for the big reveal at the end. Can you see yourself as a TV star? Apply as soon as possible as filming is set to start in late October, and those chosen this fall will have all the work done and out of the way long before next year's sunny cottage season.

Frontenac County Disability Access Award

The County of Frontenac will accept nominations for the 2014 International Day of Persons with Disabilities Access Award until October 30, 2014. Community members are encouraged to nominate those individuals and organizations in the Frontenacs who are going above and beyond to help enable persons with disabilities equal access to opportunities within the County. “Eliminating barriers and promoting inclusion is crucial to building resilient communities,” says Denis Doyle, Deputy Warden of the County of Frontenac. “This award helps bring awareness to accessibility issues across the County and celebrates the forward-thinking people and organizations who are making important, tangible differences every day.” The County, in partnership with the Frontenac Accessibility Advisory Committee (FAAC), created this award in 2013 to recognize persons, groups or organizations that have made or are making a significant contribution beyond legislated requirements, towards improving access for persons with disabilities in the County of Frontenac. Improving Access can include the design of new or renovated buildings, an employment program, a transportation system, a recreational or leisure program, or anything that contributes significantly to persons with disabilities living independently. Nomination forms can be found at www.frontenaccounty.ca and can be submitted at the County Administration Office or at any Township Administration Office. The winner will be announced at December’s County Council meeting with a luncheon to follow. For more information about this award, visit www.frontenaccounty.ca or contact Jannette Amini, Manager of Legislative Services/Clerk at 613-548-9400 ext. 302 or

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.

Frontenac County Council

Emotional council to consider naming conference room after Clayton - Sept. 3 Just two days after Warden Bud Clayton died, emotions were running high at a Committee of the Whole meeting of Frontenac County Council. Councilors paid tribute to Clayton at the start of the meeting, noting his contribution to improvements at the county, his work for Pine Meadow Nursing Home, and his commitment to North Frontenac Township. Deputy Warden Dennis Doyle then suggested that the conference room on the main floor of the county offices, which used to be used as a council chamber in the first few years following municipal amalgamation, and is now used as a committee and staff meeting room, be named the Bud Clayton room. A number of councilors said they would support such a proposal. Councilor John McDougall suggested that the proposal be deferred for a couple of weeks for council to consider any implications there may be to the naming, and for Clayton's family to be consulted. Council agreed and the matter was deferred to the September 17 Council meeting. Six Sigma on a lean There have been a parade of consultants to meetings of Frontenac County over the years, but very few, if any, have a black belt. Dale Schattenkirk, the CAO of Learning to See Consulting out of Regina, Saskatchewan, is the exception. His black belt is not in Karate, however; it is in Lean Six Sigma, and it is actually a Master Black Belt. Lean Six Sigma is not a college fraternity; it is a managerial concept that results in the elimination of waste in work processes. It is a system that was adopted by large industrial corporations in the 1980s and 1990s and has been applied to the public sector in the last 15 years or so. The goal of Lean Six Sigma is the elimination of eight kinds of waste in institutional settings: defects, overproduction, waiting, non-utilized talent, transportation, inventory, motion, extra-processing, which are expressed in an acronym – DOWNTIME. For a cost of $30,000, Shattenkirk brought a team to Frontenac County this summer to look at the county's procurement processes and at logistics within Frontenac Paramedic Services. They found little to improve upon in the procurement end but as far as logistics within Frontenac Paramedic Services they found a number of what Schattenkirk called “opportunities to improve”. Most of these have to do with better tracking of supplies used by paramedics on an ongoing basis, less extra driving by managerial and support staff to ensure supplies are in place, and better tracking of supplies to cut down on the amount of materials that end up being recycled because they reach their past due date before being used. What Schattenkirk was more interested in talking about, however, was the work culture at Frontenac County, which impressed him. “You guys are in a very good position in terms of quality improvement,” he said. “You have a group that is committed to improving the operation at all levels of the organization.” He suggested training staff to do quality improvement, using the LEAN system to train a few key members of both the management and staff teams to a LEAN yellow and green belt level. “The idea is to have everyone in the county actually engaged in how the county runs,” he said. “Within 18 months you should be completely independent. You won't need jokers like us to telling you what to do.” He also said that the money charged by his company is offset by savings, either in “light green or dark green dollars” - light green dollars referring to time saved by staff that can be used for more productive work, and dark green referring to cash savings. A proposal to extend the contract with Learning to See Consulting will be considered by Council later this month.

Warden and Mayor Bud Clayton passed away Monday, September 1st

Glenburnie ON – With great sadness, the Township of North Frontenac and the County of Frontenac received news yesterday that Warden and Mayor Bud Clayton passed away on Monday September 1, 2014. Bud was 75 years of age and is survived by his cherished wife of 53 years, Jackie, two sons and beloved grandchildren. Bud has been involved in municipal politics in the Frontenacs since 2000, when he was elected as a Councillor for North Frontenac Township. Elected Mayor of North Frontenac in 2010, Bud became a member of County Council the same year and took on the role of Warden in 2013. “Bud was an extraordinary man. He loved people and was a committed husband and father. He was dedicated, realistic, community orientated and he touched so many hearts. Bud was a forward thinker and for the betterment of our community, he initiated North Frontenac Council’s first documented Strategic Directions,” says Fred Perry, Deputy Mayor of North Frontenac Township. “He made people smile and brought laughter to their lives. He was always there to give a helping hand to anyone and he had such a positive attitude.” “As a member of County Council, Bud was always articulate in his discussions and worked hard to ensure that residents across Frontenac County received value for their tax dollars,” says Deputy Warden of Frontenac County Denis Doyle. “He always carefully listened to his peers and was pragmatic and logical in his approach to solve issues and create an atmosphere of continuous improvement and team work between staff and County Councillors. Thanks to Bud’s efforts over the past four years, the Frontenacs are a better place.” Information regarding a funeral service is not yet available.

ADDINGTON HIGHLANDS NEWS

Land O Lakes Lions putt for Cloyne Foodbank

Land O Lakes Lions putt for Cloyne Foodbank

BY J.J. (Red) Emond As ordered, the sun shone, people brushed off their old clubs, corn was husked, the barbeque was lit and the game was on for the first Land O' Lakes Lions' Charity Golf Tournament. The event took place at Hunters Creek Golf Course where staff readied the grou...

Nature north of 7- Cloyne Community Day

In an effort to get those with the best knowledge and understanding of the land north of Highway 7 to engage with local landowners and users, members of the Frontenac Stewardship Foundation organized a Community Day in Cloyne, where numerous groups and organizations gathered at the Barrie Hall to present information and answer questions. The event, which took place on September 6, was an informal gathering that included 20 booth displays representing Quinte Conservation, the Mississippi Conservation Authority, Friends of Bon Echo, the Kennebec Lake Association, Friends of the Salmon River, the North Frontenac Dark Skies Preserve, The Land O'Lakes Tourist Association, the Land Conservancy for Kingston Frontenac Lennox and Addington and more. Frontenac County Manager of Economic Development, Anne Marie Young, was present highlighting the North Frontenac Township’s Community Improvement Plan, which was recently approved by the county. The topics covered at the Community Day were plentiful and included various local histories, invasive species, land stewardship, local watersheds, water quality, septic systems, local biodiversity, geology, managing crown forest land, Benny's Pond and much more. Jenny Pearce and Matt Ellerbeck had several live snakes and salamanders on display for guests to visit with, and Chad Clifford of the Mississippi Madawaska Land Trust offered up live recordings of various soundscapes found in the area, which are used by the organization to record and create an inventory of the animal and insect life on their properties. The Cloyne Museum was open for those interested in the human history of the area, and certified chainsaw trainer Dave Smallwood and Dave Sexsmith of the Ontario Woodlot Association gave a basic talk and demonstration on safe chainsaw practices. On one table were numerous books on related topics including “Discovering Natural Processes” by Gray Merriam and Jeff Amos, “Wind, Water. Barley and Wine: The Nature of Prince Edward County” and “Lennox and Addington”, both by Orland French. Professional ecologist Gray Merriam, who wears many hats in the stewardship world, as the founding member of the Friends of the Salmon River, as a board member with the Frontenac Stewardship Foundation and a member of the Kennebec Lake Association, said that the primary aim of the event was to engage area landowners in conversation with members of these groups. “Ultimately it is the land owners and users themselves who are going to be the stewards of the land. I believe that we are well past the point where you just call a provincial phone number to have your questions answered. In my opinion the role of volunteer stewardship groups is to talk to landowners and users, find out what their objectives are and then help them to meet those objectives.” Merriam said that the second aim of the event was to give the various groups a chance to engage with one another. “The networking that has gone on this morning between the members of the groups and organizations has been wonderful and this event provides an opportunity for these like-minded groups and individuals to engage with one another, which does not happen very often.” Merriam also highlighted the fact that the land north of 7 is some of richest land in Ontario and some of the only land in the province that remains undamaged. “It is the natural capital here that we need to be working with and we want the planners to recognize that the nature of the richness here is not in factories and shopping centers but in the land itself. The natural capital here is irreplaceable and with that in mind we should be planning all future activities here with deference to that natural capital.”

New digs for Land' O Lakes Emmanuel United Church

Renovations are usually not much fun but for Reverend Judith Evenden of Land O’Lakes Emmanuel United Church, designing and renovating what will be a brand new church is a dream come true. In 2009, the Harlowe, Cloyne and Riverside Flinton United churches amalgamated and became the Land O’Lakes Emmanuel congregation. In 2011 the members made the decision to sell their three churches (and one manse) and begin the search for a new place of worship. Evenden said that it was accessibility issues and/or lack of washroom facilities at the three churches that led to the decision to find a new place of worship. “The congregation came at that time to a place of knowing that if everyone let go of their churches and grieved that loss, we could then move forward and start fresh with a new vision and a new sense of coming together.” Following the sale of the Cloyne United Church in October 2011, the last of the properties to be sold, the task group appointed with the job of finding a new facility decided on the criteria that needed to be met. They wanted a centrally located, accessible, and multi-purpose facility to be purchased outright so that the church would not have to go into debt. That goal was reached in November 2013 when a three-bedroom bungalow with a three-car garage in Northbrook, which was built 10 years ago by Sandor and Eleanore Kaltner, was purchased. The building is located on a 23-acre parcel of land and is slowly being transformed into the new church facility that Evenden believes will meet all of the needs of the congregation while also serving the community. The architect working on the project is Bruce Downey of Kingston with local contractor Mike Cumming. The 2900 square foot main floor, which incorporates the former garage space. is wheelchair accessible and boasts a 1600 square foot sanctuary. “The worship space is bigger than any we have had in the past and the plan is to make it completely flexible with no permanent furniture so that we can use it for worship but also for weddings, funerals, yoga, movie nights and other community events,” Evenden said earlier this week. Also on the main floor are a servery/ kitchen area, three washrooms, a meeting room, main office and the minister’s study. In the main vestibule will hang a panting by Don Wise titled “Church Street”, which depicts the five churches in the former pastoral charge. A verandah that stretches across the entire front of the building will be a place for visiting and Evenden hopes to be able to have numerous walking trails on site. There are also plans that the indoor elevator on site will also be upgraded as well. Some of the old furnishings from the former churches will grace the new building, including the three crosses from the church's sanctuaries, the pulpit from Cloyne, communion tables from Harlowe and Cloyne, the organ from Harlowe, and the piano from Riverside Flinton. Many of the smaller worship symbols were also kept and will be used at the new church. “The aim is to create a safe, beautiful place where people can gather and be in the midst of nature. What we can do here is only limited by our available finances and by people's imaginations.” The renovations have not come without challenges since as a space of public assembly the building must meet specific health, fire and building codes. “I think people are wondering what is taking so long but a lot has to be done to make sure that everything is done properly and up to code.” While most of the major construction work has been done, the drywall and finishing touches still need to be completed. Much of the work being done and the materials have been donated by members of the congregation and the community. Evenden hopes that the community will also use the space and with that in mind is inviting members of the community at large who support the values of the church to consider donating to the cost of the renovations. Those interested can contact Rev. Judith Evenden at 613-336-2655 or by email at

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. Evenden is hoping that the project will completed by October. “Personally I'd love us to be in here for the World Wide Communion Sunday that takes place the first week in October.” Until that time worship will continue at the Lions Hall in Northbrook on Sundays at 10am.

Addington Highlands Council

Trouble with new fire hall construction in Northbrook In a verbal report to Addington Highlands Council at their Sept. 2 meeting, Fire Chief Casey Cuddy talked about a disagreement that has emerged with the construction company, Task Force Construction, that is building a new fire hall for the township south of Northbrook. Some other issues with the company have emerged as well. The dispute has to do with the wiring for an emergency generator at the new hall. To save money the township opted not to have Task Force put in a generator, which they had costed at $30,000 in their bid. “They are saying that the $30,000 was for the generator and the wiring, and by opting out of one we were opting out of the other,” Cuddy said. “The specs included the wiring. I think we should get Jewell Engineering to deal with this. That's what we are paying them to do,” said Deputy Reeve Bill Cox. Members of council also noted that the project has not been proceeding as expected. “They aren't there today,” said Reeve Henry Hogg, “and some of what I've seen is unusual.” Hogg said that he saw insulation going in on a wet day. “They said if the insulation is wet they will pull it out,” Hogg added. Township to meet with ministry over Official Plan Addington Highlands' five-year Official Plan review, which has not been ratified by the Ministry of Housing and Rural Affairs two years after it was first submitted, will be the subject of a meeting between the township and the ministry in late September. The two sides are not close to agreeing on the final wording of the document. “They are putting restrictions on waterfront lots in their wording, restrictions on hamlets; the whole document they are putting forward will tie our hands,” said Reeve Hogg. “It looks like this review won't be complete until we have to start our next five-year review,” he added. Grading, grass cutting have something in common. Deputy Reeve Bill Cox reported that the library board has complained about the lawn mowing in front of the two libraries. “The boy gets heck if he cuts it too early, or if he cuts it too late. They need more things to think about.” In his own report, Public Works Manager Royce Rosenblath said he “knows how the grass cutter feels. You grade the roads too much for some people, not enough for others. Everybody complains,” he said. On a more ominous note, Rosenblath reported that winter sand is being delivered to the Denbigh garage. “Winter is coming,” he said.  

Official opening of L&A County Museum and archives kicks off 150th celebrations

Close to 80 guests attended the official opening and ribbon cutting ceremony of the newly expanded Lennox and Addington County Museum and Archives in Napanee on August 22. Stephen Paul, director of community and development services with the county, emceed the event, which took place at the Court House Campus. County Warden and Mayor of Greater Napanee, Gord Schermerhorn, spoke of the building of the county courthouse and jail 150 years ago, followed by the registry office and the jailer’s house in 1891. Two years ago the county began a $5 million capital project in recognition of their 150th anniversary this year. The project included the expansion of the museum and archives along with a newly constructed garage to house the custodial and maintenance services for the county's 47 buildings and associated properties. Originally constructed in 1864 as the county jail, the museum and archives building was first retrofitted in 1974. The plans for expanding the facility began in 2001 when the county hired the Ventin Group architects to complete an assessment of the building. It was then that the county began putting aside funds for the project. In the fall of 2011 a strategic priority setting exercise was conducted that identified the preservation of the county’s heritage as one of seven priorities. With the approaching 150th anniversary, the Ventin Group was rehired to complete the design for the expansion and in January 2013 the project was awarded to PEAK Engineering and Construction Ltd. The new addition to the museum and archive is approximately 10,000 square feet on two levels and includes a new glazed corridor entrance that links the addition to the elevator, which provides access to the second floor of the building. The reception area and the manager’s office were both renovated, and beyond them, a new lecture/multi-purpose room was built in previously unused courtyard space. Also located on the ground floor is a new research/reading room, an archivist’s office and an adjoined compact archival storage space. New washrooms were also built as well as a freight elevator that connects a receiving area with basement storage areas. The museum contains approximately 10,000 artifacts including toys, furniture, clothing, glass, ceramics, tools and household goods and the archives holds an extensive collection of documents as well as genealogical files. CAO Larry Keech aptly described the new addition as “understated” and while tasteful, spacious, and modern, it in no way overpowers the original feel of the heritage stone building due to the fact that the primary building materials used were limestone, glass, aluminum panels and natural wood. Keech thanked everyone involved in both projects, from the designers and builders to the county planning team and museum staff. The Lennox and Addington Historical Society is one of the oldest historical societies in Ontario and a brief history was given by its president, Jennifer Bunting. It unofficially began in 1885, the year of the United Empire Loyalist centennial, and was officially established in 1904. Bunting spoke of Walter Stevens Harrington, who “was deeply moved by the Loyalist centennial” and wrote a book on the history of Lennox and Addington, collecting stories and documents from the children of the pioneers. In an effort to find a home for all of his documents, Harrington, along with Clarence Warner of Wilton, established the historical society. Following the official ribbon cutting, guests were invited into the building for a reception and to explore the many new displays, which included two exhibits commemorating the centennial of World War 1: “Fashions from the Home Front” and “The Empire Needs Men”. A third new exhibit highlighted the work of local painter Orval Madden. Also on display was an archival exhibit of photos and articles from the county's centennial celebrations in 1964. The 150th anniversary celebrations continued the following day, August 23 at the Court House Campus with live music by fiddle masters Natalie MacMaster and Donnell Leahy as well as performances by Circus Orange and local musicians, which were well attended.

EDITORIALS

Bud Clayton – one memory

Bud Clayton – one memory

One of the sad parts of Bud Clayton's passing this week won't hit for another year or so. When the Pine Meadow Nursing Home redevelopment project is complete and the ribbon is cut, he won't be there to share in the accomplishment along with a handful of other people who wouldn't ...

Marilyn Crawford made a difference

Over the weekend, Marilyn Crawford died after a battle with cancer. From what I've been told, she had been dealing with cancer for several years, but apparently was able to do some travelling with her husband and co-conspirator, Buddy. For those who don't remember, she was a founding member of the Bedford Mining Alert and a major force in the revamping of the Ontario Mining Act as it is applied in Southern Ontario. She went on to become an activist for justice in mining, particularly the impacts of mining on women around the world, as a board member and co-chair of Mining Watch Canada in Ottawa. The truly amazing thing about changes to the Ontario Mining Act, which came about a few years ago, is that groups like the Bedford Mining Alert and people like Marilyn, Mary Louks, Maureen Towaij, Peter Griesbach and Frank and Gloria Morrison and others played a direct role in bringing about reform. It all started for Marilyn, and most of the others mentioned above, when they noticed that trees had been cut down, trenches had been dug and stakes were up all over their property. That's when they found out that they did not own the subsurface rights to their properties. They also found out that the prospectors who had laid claim to the minerals underneath had a lot of rights to use the surface in order to access their mining claims. The first meeting of the Bedford Mining Alert took place in 2000. From that point on, the outrage they each felt turned into iron resolve. Everyone played their own role, and they did not always agree on tactics or even goals, but each of the people mentioned above was part of the change that took place. For her part, Marilyn Crawford studied the Ontario Mining Act. She became so well versed in the act that when ministry officials came to meetings in Bedford and elsewhere in Eastern Ontario, they found themselves being instructed on some of the details of the act as they defended ministry practices. When the mining act was changed, the initial goal of Bedford Mining Alert members, which was to protect the interests of landowners who did not own their subsurface rights, had been accomplished. Those lands cannot be staked any more. But long before those changes and others came in, Marilyn's interests in the impact of mining on individuals moved her in many new directions and brought depth to her politics. She was a resource person and a part of the struggle over uranium exploration in Algonquin and Land Claim territory in North Frontenac in 2007 and 2008. Although she initially used the resources of Mining Watch Canada, an Ottawa-based not-for-profit that works with groups in Canada and around the world to help with her own case and that of her neighbours, Marilyn ended up joining the board of Mining Watch and was co-chair between 2008 and her death last weekend. Ramsay Hart, the Canadian program director at Mining Watch, originally met Marilyn from the other side of a hiring table when he was being interviewed for the job he has held for five years. He said this week that, “Beyond her role as board member she has been a great resource person for me whenever I have had questions about the mining act. She was also a very caring and warm person and wanted to make sure that the staff were doing well.” He said that Marilyn developed educational material for schools around the Mining Act and made presentations to students. “She always took a strong interest in the various ways the mining industry is privileged over the people who live on the land that they use for its resources,” he said. This brought her attention to the plight of women and Aboriginal peoples around the world as they are subjected to international mining interests, a large issue, far removed from the interests of rural landowners in Southern Ontario. As a political activist, Marilyn could be hard on those she opposed, and even on those she was working with. She was always clear about the specific change she was seeking, and did not generally alter her goals in order to get along with others. Many of the people she worked with had their own agendas and strong personalities as well, so she could be a polarizing figure, and she made and lost friends along the way. My memories of Marilyn Crawford were of a mutual benefit situation. When she needed publicity for something, when she had a goal in mind, she called and was always upfront about what she was looking to get out of a story in the Frontenac News. When I was looking for information, she was a resource. She always shared whatever she knew or pointed me in the right direction. And she was a lot of fun. She had a sense of humour about politics and about the internal politics of the people and groups she was involved with. Peter Griesbach, one of her first allies from the very beginnings of the Bedford Mining Alert, who went on to play a role with the Federation of Ontario Cottage Association and through them the Adivsory Panel on Changes to the Mining Act, put it this way: “Marilyn kept on with her mining rights activity long after many of us were done and had moved on to other things. I think she, and her husband Buddy - he played a role in everything she did, made a real difference - even though she was fighting cancer for a number of years.”

Policing Costs Will Rise, Details to Follow

In North and Central Frontenac there are two police officers scheduled to cover policing needs at all times. In the daytime they sometimes patrol in two cars and at night they double up in one vehicle. The same level of service is provided in Tay Valley. In South Frontenac, where there is a policing contract, the service level is a bit higher. The police who serve all these communities also spend a lot of time working directly for the Province of Ontario by covering Highway 7 and Highway 401, which are not within the jurisdiction of the townships. These levels of service are not changing, but what is changing is how much people will be charged for policing on their property tax bills. Ever since policing costs were downloaded to municipalities almost 15 years, the way costs are calculated for municipalities who are not under a fixed contract with the OPP has been shrouded in mystery. When the province announced they were going to change the formula and make it transparent it was well received by the municipalities. Unfortunately, for the small municipalities in Eastern Ontario at least, it became clear when proposals for a new formula were introduced that increases were on the way. The problem is that the main piece of information the province is using for calculating charges is the number of households in a municipality. At first the proposal was to base all the cost entirely on this, and the figure that was floated was about $350 per household. This would be very expensive locally, in large part because the formula does not distinguish between seasonal and full-time residences. North Frontenac Township paid $234,000 for policing in 2014, and with 3,500 households, the cost would skyrocket to $1.25 million. Central Frontenac, which paid $794,000 in 2014, would jump to $1.4 million. Tay Valley would go from about $500,00 to $1.35 million. The province has moderated the formula, announcing last week that 60% of the billing would be based on the number of residences and 40% based on calls for service. Municipal officials whom I have contacted are unclear about what this will mean for their ratepayers, and they will find out in early September, when information sessions are scheduled. There will also be a four-year phase-in to cushion the blow, and according to a government press release the maximum a municipality will be charged is a $40 per household increase each year for the five years. The best case scenario then, for North Frontenac ratepayers, would then be an increase of $700,000 over five years, which translates to a 14% increase in taxes over the time period just for policing costs. Central Frontenac could see a smaller increase, somewhere in the order of 10%. South Frontenac's policing contract will be affected by this change, and the details will be released in September. Since there are about 10,000 households in South Frontenac, and the township budgeted $2.7 million for policing in 2014 (up from $2.3 million in 2013) there is every reason to believe that costs will go up to about $3.6 million over five years, a $900,000 increase that represents a 7.5% increase in taxes for South Frontenac ratepayers. In conversations with some of the township treasurers about this, it was clear that they do not yet know what the announcements from the province actually means for their budgets in 2015 and beyond, but they do expect large increases. As we are about to go headlong into a municipal election campaign, these figures might temper some of the candidates' election promises.

A leopard is a leopard

The published photo of Kathleen Wynne greeting Dalton McGuinty at the Ontario legislature with open arms on the day of the swearing in of her new government, coupled with McGuinty being quoted as saying the recent election was a vindication of his time in office, was a bit hard to take. After saying “I am not McGuinty; we are a new party, we will rule differently” from the day of her ascendance to party leadership until the day of the election 14 months later, Kathleen Wynne's smile in that photo had a Cheshire cat quality to it. Politicians are a cynical lot. They play a hard game of front page image control and backroom deals and counter deals, and Kathleen Wynne has turned out to be a master at that game. All of us, the electorate, participated in the ruse, to be sure. We knew what had gone on under McGuinty and we knew Wynne was a loyal member of the cabinet that moved two gas plants, setting off a chain of events that resulted in a $1 billion loss to taxpayers. She sat at the cabinet table as the ORNGE air ambulance debacle unfolded. She was there all along and we know she was there all along. As his replacement, she profited from McGuinty's most cynical act, a prorogation of the legislature for a full six months after his resignation, for no other reason than to create distance for his party as they selected a new leader. By all rights we should have chucked the Liberals out of power, but since the other parties, for different reasons, did not provide a safe haven for many voters, enough of us decided to swallow Kathleen Wynne's claim that the new Liberals would give us good government, keep up our social programs and somehow balance the books over the next four years. Even so the decision to rehabilitate McGuinty right after the election came off as a slap in the face. I recall another Liberal politician, one who in his heyday demonstrated toughness and a common touch in a bit of the way the Kathleen Wynne does, Jean Chretien. At one point he was asked about the Liberal party's past and all the miscues it made when governing in the 1970s and 80s, while he was a cabinet minister “I will not apologize for the past; I was part of it and I am proud of it,” he said. Kathleen Wynne made a point of apologizing for the past during the recent election campaign. Now, if we ever had a doubt before, we know that it was the thinnest of apologies. In fact she was simply saying whatever she had to in order to give her party the best chance at re-election. No wonder then, that voices as disparate as Susan Delacourt from the left-leaning Toronto Star and libertarian MPP Randy Hillier are now questioning the political party system. Hillier wants parties to respect the electorate by granting MPs and MPPs a greater role in all aspects of political decision-making, while Delacourt wrote about the idea of eliminating political parties altogether and running provincial and federal governments the way municipalities run, with independent representatives voting their conscience on every proposal that comes forward. In the short run at least, neither of those things are likely to happen. We live in an era of power politics. To the victor goes the spoils and Kathleen Wynne now holds all the power in Ontario in her own hands.  

Pride in Canada

Far be it from me to praise the City of Toronto, under any circumstances. But I have to make an exception. Last week the City hosted the World Pride conference, which culminated in a parade that was attended by 2 million people. Compared with all of the difficulties that result from hosing just 8 world leaders a couple of years ago, by all accounts World Pride was a roaring success. We live in a time where nations as diverse as Russia, Uganda, and others, have ramped up institutional and legal persecution of gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgendered people in recent months. LGBT people have faced persecution to the point of death in the most extreme cases for no other reason than their sexuality for centuries and still do. For Canada to be at the vanguard of those nations whose legal systems have closed the door on institutional persecution of individuals on the basis of sexual orientation, as well as race and religion, is a point of pride for me as a citizen. For the City of Toronto to host such an event as World Pride and to demonstrate a willingness to celebrate diversity is even more gratifying, and I daresay Toronto is ahead of many other communities in Ontario and Canada in this regard. Watching coverage of the parade also jogged a personal memory for me. As it happens, I found myself in the middle of one of the first Pride parades in Toronto in the early 90’s, and the contrast between the this most recent parade and that one could not be more stark. I was with my wife Martina and our young daughter at a small art show in a courtyard behind a church near the corner of Bay and Bloor on a cold Sunday in June. It was 22 or 23 years ago. Someone said that a parade was coming by and the show opening would be delayed, so we went to the corner to see. What we saw was more of a low-key march than a parade. A hundred people or, some of them with placards, walked by. They waved, called out a few slogans, and kept on walking. Many of them were thin, even gaunt, and were walking with the help from friends. 20 years ago AIDS was in full swing in Canada. What I saw on that day was a community fighting for its life against a deadly disease that at that time had no effective treatment. No none lined the street to watch the parade. The busy City carried on its business as usual. What has since been dubbed the LGBT community has developed and thrived in unexpected ways over the past 20 years, to the point where, in Toronto at least, Pride is a celebration and a premiere tourist event in the City Canada Day in our communities is about pancake breakfasts and the parades and games and food and music at ball-fields and beaches. It is about wearing red and white and the maple leaf and family and friends and enjoying the official start of all too short Canadian summer. And it about fireworks at the end of the day. It is also a time to reflect on all the benefits we enjoy as Canadians. Of the things we can be proud of in Canada on Canada Day, chief among them are the personal liberty we enjoy, our commitment to live together in peace, and the celebration of diversity has become the hallmark of this country. As the world threatens to slip into intolerance, this is something we all need to protect in our words and deeds throughout the year.

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