Saddling up to send kids to camp

Saddling up to send kids to camp

The three-year-old tradition of raising funds to send local kids to camp continued at Arden's Circle Square Ranch on October 19. Over 20 riders saddled up to participate in the ranch's third annual Ri...

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MERA art exhibition

MERA art exhibition

Written By: News Staff | Published: October-23-2014 | Category: Lanark County
Tagged Under: McDonalds Corners, mera, Arts & Culture

Submitted by MERA Every month a new local artist's work is featured in the main hall at MERA - a community arts organization in McDonalds's Corners in Lanark Highlands. You can catch the end of the O...

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“Flickr”-ing the past into the present at the Cloyne and District Historical Society

“Flickr”-ing the past into the present at the Cloyne and District Historical Society

As a means of gathering more historic photos and documents as well as making their current collection more accessible to the world at large, members of the Cloyne and District Historical Society (CDHS...

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Special service celebrates 165 years at St. Paul's United in Harrowsmith

Special service celebrates 165 years at St. Paul's United in Harrowsmith

A special service on October 19 at St. Paul's United Church in Harrowsmith marked the 165th year that the church has been a gathering place of worship for the local community in and around Harrowsmith...

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NAEC students feel the beat

NAEC students feel the beat

by Valerie Allan Students and staff found their rhythm at high energy, fun workshops presented by Derek De Beers on Friday, October 17. Derek brought a large assortment of drums and other percussion ...

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Celebrating 18 years of “dropping in”

Mike Procter, adult protective services worker at Northern Frontenac Community Services in Sharbot L...

Granite Ridge Academic Awards:

by Elizabeth Steele-Drew Granite Ridge Education Centre celebrated the accomplishments of the grade...

United Way Breakfast at GREC

 The event is just one of three United Way fundraisers that happen annually at the school every...

The Beaver: Pest or Eco-Hero?

By Susan Sentesy, MMLT Beavers have always had a special relationship with humans in Canada. Almost...

Stellar opener at MERA's classical concert series

If the first of the three classical music concerts in the MERA Schoolhouse's Blue Jean Classical Sun...

County OP delayed as consensus seeking continues

After 18 months of work, and three formal drafts, the Frontenac County Official Plan was set for app...

Community Paramedicine project in Frontenac and Kingston

Frontenac County is one of the recipients of $6 million in provincial funding for community paramedi...

Seeking foster families for teens

Family and Children's Services of Frontenac, Lennox and Addington (FACSFLA) is searching the city an...

Congregate dining – a benefit to a senior's health

by Sonja Alcock Coming together for a meal is a common occurrence. Often the first date for a new b...

Trenton woodlot conference

by Susan Moore The 25th annual Trenton Woodlot Conference will be held on Friday, Nov. 21, 8am to 4...

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SOUTH FRONTENAC

South Frontenac Council - Oct 3/13

Run for Council, win an i-pad Next year's municipal elections will have more at stake than a small name plaque and the license to rail agai...

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FRONTENAC COUNTY

Rural Municipalities Seek Help In Saving Borer-Infected Ash Trees

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) is the federal agency that has conducted an expensive (and unsuccessful) battle against the Emera...

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SOUTH FRONTENAC

South Frontenac Council - June 6/13

Tinlin resigns South Frontenac Council by Jeff Green Citing personal family reasons, first-term Bedford District Councilor Mark Tinlin has...

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NORTH FRONTENAC NEWS

North Frontenac Council - Apr 29/14

North Frontenac Council - Apr 29/14

North Frontenac passes budget amid looming OPP cost crisis After several months of budget-crunching sessions between staff and council, North Frontenac managed to square the circle - almost, coming up with a 2014 budget that established a reserve for long-term infrastructure whi...

North Frontenac Council - Apr 8/14

North Frontenac tax levy to go up by 3% Most of increase devoted to long-term needs While the levy to ratepayers in North Frontenac is going up by 3% this year, the operating budgets of township departments have been trimmed. As part of the asset management strategy that Council took on late last year, North Frontenac has set aside 2% of the money they raise from taxation to put in a fund to cover replacement costs for all roads, bridges and buildings that the township owns. That left a tax increase for township operations of $53,214 (1.06%), even as a number of fixed costs went up. “There was some new spending, including $15,000 as part of our doctor recruitment commitment for the Lakelands Health Team and $54,000 for playground equipment, which will only be spent if we get a grant that we have applied for,” said township Chief Administrative Officer Cheryl Robson. “In order to keep from a larger increase in the levy each department was asked to find cuts, which they did. There were no cuts to service, but it will be a lean year this year.” The township's draft budget, which will include a total levy of $5.2 million to North Frontenac ratepayers, was approved in principle at a meeting of council on Monday (April 7) and will be presented for public comment at the beginning of the next council meeting on April 28. It is anticipated that the budget document will be approved by bylaw at that time. The two other components of the tax bill that goes to North Frontenac ratepayers, county and education taxes, are each up by about $35,000 this year, for a total increase of $125,000 to be split among all the township's ratepayers. Pine Lake It's been almost eight years since members of the Ardoch Algonquin First Nation occupied a piece of public land adjacent to a boat launch at Pine Lake, off Ardoch Road. The small property, which is managed by the Ministry of Natural Resources, (MNR) has continued to be used as a boat launch and there is a small road running over it between Ardoch Road and the lake. Back in 2006, the Ardoch Algonquins asserted an Aboriginal claim to the property by cutting trees and putting up a portable metal building. Their stated intention was to establish a band office on the property. But nothing has happened on the property for a number of years, except that brush has grown where the trees had been cleared. The portable building has remained but has not been used at all. In February, the township authorized CAO Cheryl Robson to write the MNR asking that the portable be removed. “Council requests that MNR remove this derelict portable from this property, at your earliest possible convenience,” said Cheryl Robson in a letter to Michael Gatt of the Bancroft ministry office. Last week a letter of response came from Suzy Shalla, Resources Management Supervisor in Bancroft. “I did want to respond to thank you and the Council for bringing forward your concerns regarding the structure located near the boat launch at Pine Lake. MNR is aware of the structure that is located there, however we will not be pursuing removal of the building at this time.” Township office remediation update - Township staff remain housed in portable offices as well as a temporary office in the Clar-Mill fire hall as Service Master and Concord Engineering continue to work on the heating oil spill that took place in early February. Council received a report from Concord Engineering which says that there is no evidence that the ground under the building has been contaminated, but a number of walls and some flooring has been removed as part of ongoing clean-up efforts. There is no time frame for the completion of repairs, which are all covered by the township's insurance policy. Ompah fire hall and community hall back to square one Council soundly rejected two proposals for upgrades to the Ompah fire hall/community hall property. The first proposal, which came in response to a tender for repairs and upgrades, would have cost $360,000. It was supported by Councilor John Inglis and rejected by the rest of Council. The second proposal, which was put forward by Councillor Wayne Good, would have capped spending on upgrades at $50,000, inclusive of a $10,000 accessibility expenditures that is mandated by the Province of Ontario. Although Council has put aside over $200,000 for the project, Good wanted to redirect that money to build a new township office. Good pointed out that there is only one trained firefighter living within a 5 km radius of the hall, and a limited capacity hall would serve the community needs. His proposal was supported by himself, and no one else. Councilor Betty Hunter then proposed that $180,000 be spent on the hall, and that the Ompah fire hall task force, which came up with the proposal that led to the $360,000 tender, be brought back together to figure out how to spend only $180,000 on the building, and do so this year. Her motion was accepted. An additional $50,000 has been pledged by the Ompah volunteers, and there remains an additional $10,000 available for accessibility features.

North Frontenac Council Feb. 3

Septic re-inspection program Ed Gardiner, from Kingston Frontenac Lennox and Addington Public Health, made a proposal to council for a mandatory septic re-inspection program. Until now the township has been contracting with the Mississippi-Rideau Septic System office for a voluntary program. But each of the last two years the number of systems inspected has lagged below the target because a number of landowners have been unresponsive to repeated attempts to engage them in a re-inspection. Changes to Ontario legislation have permitted municipalities to engage in mandatory programs if they choose to do so. One of the stipulations is that the re-inspections be done by the same agency that is responsible for approvals to new septic systems. In the case of North Frontenac that agency is KFL&A Public Health. Gardiner said that it would cost the township $12,000 per year for the health unit to complete 160 inspections, with a focus on inspecting high risk systems, properties with no record of approved sewage systems, or properties with systems that are over 20 years old. He said that the program would be run out of the KFL&A office in Cloyne and that inspection reports would be sent to the landowner and the township. As far as enforcement is concerned Ed Gardiner said that if a report says remedial action is required, “a reasonable amount of time, determined by the township chief building official,” should be given. “If no action is taken the chief building official or the inspector will issue an order to comply,” he said. The township has now received two proposals, one from Mississippi-Rideau and one from KFL&A Public Health. In order to proceed they will have to choose one or the other to do all of their inspection work, on new and old systems. Planner ready to go to the OMB if necessary Joe Gallivan, the planner for Frontenac County, presented the second draft of the Frontenac County Official Plan to Council. Gallivan said the plan, which sets out a policy framework and leaves most of the detailed information to the township plan, has been submitted to the Ministry of Municipal Affairs for comment. Based on the response of the ministry to the Renfrew County Official Plan, and the North Frontenac Official Plan, Gallivan said he is concerned about how the ministry will likely respond to the approach the county is taking. “Frankly I'm not that optimistic at this point. It might be that we end up with an OMB challenge on this.” Two issues are of major concern to Gallivan, and to North Frontenac, who are at an impasse with the ministry with their own plan. One is the ministry position that no new development shall be permitted on private roads, even if there are strong rules in place about the quality and width of those roads. The other deals with the ministry's insistence that development be oriented to hamlets and villages, “which is totally contrary to the demand for development on the ground in places like Frontenac County,” Gallivan said. Construction up in 2013 Building permits were issued for over $7.3 million worth of construction in 2013, including six new inland and 20 new waterfront residences. The total for 2012 was $6.3 million. Mayor talks about County Mayor Clayton, who is also the Warden of Frontenac County, said he remains frustrated about the county budget process. “I still feel there is some push back from some of the managers at the county. When we ask them to make cuts they come back with reasons why it is impossible to make any. All we are asking of the two major programs, Fairmount Home and land ambulance, is that they bring costs to the average of costs among services of comparative size, instead of above the average. I think the administration of both programs could be a bit top-heavy,” he said. In summing up a strategic planning session, Clayton said, “There is an expression that goes 'if the people won't change, change the people'. There may be something that needs to happen like that.” War memorial funding frustration Councilor Gerry Martin has been chairing a task force that has been developing a proposal for a war memorial in the township for the past year. The task force was planning to submit an application for funding to the Community War Memorial Program, a five-year granting program administered by Veterans' Affairs Canada that was set to run until 2015. However, when the task force contacted Veterans' Affairs in January, seeking an application form for the program, they received the response that “unfortunately the Community War Memorial Program is no longer accepting funding applications due to higher than anticipated demand.” Martin prepared a letter to MP Scott Reid asking for his assistance in dealing with Veterans' Affairs on the matter. Council approved the letter.

Clayton Doubtful in North Frontenac

“I don't know yet,” said Bud Clayton when asked if he was planning to seek re-election as mayor of North Frontenac after one four-year term. “If things remain the way they are now, I would say it would be no, but things can change.” Clayton added that he had not planed to run during the last election in 2010, but decided at the last minute to give former Deputy Mayor Jim Beam a run for his money since there were no other candidates coming forward. He ended up winning. “I don't want to hang on past my best-before date,” Clayton said this week, “but I have not made a final decision by any means.” Gutowski leaning towards running in Central Frontenac “In all likelihood I will be running,” two-time incumbent Janet Gutowski said when asked if she was going to run for a third term as mayor of Central Frontenac. “I'm very committed to this township and I think there is still a lot to be accomplished,” she said. Among the issues that Gutowski will be addressing during the election year are seniors’ housing and the future of service delivery in Central Frontenac. “I can see us seeking partnerships with other townships and a continued role for Frontenac County as well,” she said. “Provincial policies are always impacting us as a township, and the City of Kingston has an impact on our residents on a daily basis because they run our social services. It is only through the county that we can even talk to them; there is no other venue.”

North Frontenac Council - Dec. 17/13

North Frontenac pulls back from hall redundancy. After meeting with user groups from the Snow Road, Harlowe, and Clarendon and Miller halls, North Frontenac Council decided to rescind part of a bylaw they passed last July, which stipulated that the halls were to be declared as surplus property in the future. Mayor Clayton had maintained that declaring the halls surplus did not necessarily mean they would be closing, only that they would no longer be in line for re-building at the end of their useful life. However, he has also talked about a township preference for building a single, central hall and township office. Councilors have been hearing from hall users ever since the bylaw was passed in July, and at their meeting the clause about declaring the halls surplus was removed. Asset management plan finalized Vicki Leakey, from KPMG, presented the final version of the North Frontenac Asset Management Plan to council. Municipalities in Ontario are required to have these plans in place if they are to be eligible for provincial infrastructure grants next year. Some municipalities have produced basic documents that were created by sending data to a consulting firm and receiving a template-based document back. In North Frontenac's case, KPMG has met extensively with staff and council and the plan has been under development all year. The North Frontenac plan encompasses paved roads, bridges, equipment, and all township-owned buildings. Next year information about gravel roads will be added. Leakey's report concludes, as she told council last month when presenting a draft, that the township has done a good job of investing in infrastructure needs over the last 10 years, and by parceling off an added 2% in taxation towards infrastructure spending into the future, they will come closer to keeping up with the requirement for rebuilding roads, bridges, equipment, and buildings as they age and need to be replaced. Leakey costed out the rebuilding at $7.5 million. “There is not a municipality in Ontario that is not falling behind, at least to some extent, and North Frontenac is probably doing better than most,” Leakey said. One factor that is not in North Frontenac's favour is its negative growth rate, which among other things, means less money is available from property taxes. The report presented it in stark terms. “While the province's population increased by 19.5% between 1996 and 2011, North Frontenac's population dropped by 3.9%.” And those who remain in North Frontenac are ageing. Thirty-nine percent of the total personal income among township residents is derived from pensions, while the provincial average is 14%. “The greater reliance on fixed income pension reduces the ability of the municipality to raise funds through taxation,” said Leakey's report. OPP billing questions The township supported efforts by other municipalities to scuttle a proposed new billing system for OPP services that would see the township charged on a per household basis, including seasonal as well as permanent residents. Township staff calculate this would bring the North Frontenac bill from $205,000 to $1.15 million - a 458% increase. “It's funny how they bill us for the seasonal residents but when it comes to grants they look only at our permanent residents,” said Mayor Clayton. “They like to play both sides of the coin.”

CENTRAL FRONTENAC NEWS

Saddling up to send kids to camp

Saddling up to send kids to camp

The three-year-old tradition of raising funds to send local kids to camp continued at Arden's Circle Square Ranch on October 19. Over 20 riders saddled up to participate in the ranch's third annual Ride-a-thon, an event whose goal is to raise funds to subsidize children who might...

Celebrating 18 years of “dropping in”

Mike Procter, adult protective services worker at Northern Frontenac Community Services in Sharbot Lake, was all smiles following a celebration on October 15 marking the 18th year of the weekly Wednesday drop-in lunch, which has grown markedly over close to two decades. In 1996, the Province of Ontario closed the Adult Rehabilitation Centre Industries (ARCs), which brought an end to one of the sheltered workshop adult day programs that ran in Mountain Grove and was geared to community members with developmental disabilities. Mike Procter founded the weekly drop-ins as a response to the closures. He said, "When that happened there was not much for our clients to do in the community so I decided to start this weekly lunch as a way for people to get together, enjoy some food, socialize and get a chance to develop friendships.” Procter got the necessary agencies together, acquired the initial letters of support and the necessary funding, and through a partnership with Northern Frontenac Community Services (NFCS), Community Living-North Frontenac and the Northern Connections Literacy Centre, the weekly lunches were initiated. The agencies each put in a bit of money to buy the first meal and on its first day in 1996, 13 people showed up. On October 15, 32 people attended and on average 25 people come every week to enjoy the lunches, which take place Wednesdays at St. Andrew's Anglican Church in Sharbot Lake from 10am until 2pm. The meetings include a hot, home-made healthy meal, juice, coffee, dessert - all for only $4. Procter usually cooks the meal but often volunteers also offer him a hand. “If for some reason I cannot be here the program stills runs by itself,” which Proctor said is a good thing. “I will not be here for ever so it is nice to know that the program will be able to continue.” When the event began, it attracted mostly clients from NFCS but Proctor said that that has changed. “Now about 25% of our guests are members of the community at large.” Proctor also stressed that the meetings are much more about socializing than just about having a meal. “People come early and some often stay all day. For many people it is the highlight of their week and when a regular visitor is missing, others notice immediately and will often check up on that person to make sure that he or she is okay.” The $4 cost covers the expense of the food and renting the hall. For attendees without transportation guests will often carpool. Those wishing to attend the Wednesday drop in but who do not have transportation can contact Mike Procter at 613-279-3151. The monthly menus are posted on Facebook at What's Happening Central Frontenac.

Granite Ridge Academic Awards:

by Elizabeth Steele-Drew Granite Ridge Education Centre celebrated the accomplishments of the grade 9 -11 students from the 2013-2014 school year on October 15 at our annual Academic Awards Assembly. Congratulations to all Gryphons from last year on their excellent academic achievements. Students received subject awards for earning the highest mark in a class; honour pins for earning an 80% or more average; a Provincial Standard Award for reaching the Provincial Standard average of 70%; a Gryphon of Extraordinary Excellence award for earning Excellent in all 6 learning skills in 6 subjects as well as special awards generously donated by community members. As well, proficiency trophies for earning the highest academic average in a grade were awarded to Alison Maddison (Grade 11 with an 89%), Riley Teal (Grade 10 with a 91%) and Brianna Drew (Grade 9 with a 92%). Seventy-five percent of last year’s grade 9 class, seventy-eight percent of the grade 10s and eighty-three percent of the grade 11s from the last school year were recognized for their incredible academic accomplishments. The staff of Granite Ridge Education Centre would like to thank the parents/guardians who attended. We appreciate the partnership that we have developed to support our students as they learn and grow.  

United Way Breakfast at GREC

 The event is just one of three United Way fundraisers that happen annually at the school every year. Local area high school students can also support the KFLA United Way at their upcoming Starlight Film Festival event, which takes place in Kingston at the Cineplex Odeon on Gardiners Road from 12:30AM-6:30 AM on Saturday, November 8 (Friday night to Saturday morning). Five PG-rated movies will be shown: Anchorman 2, Despicable Me, Pacific Rim, Pitch Perfect and X-Men: First Class. Tickets are $20 (cash only) and include free arcade games, unlimited popcorn, a drink and a free hot dog. The event is only for high school students and is a non-smoking event. Valid student ID is required. Doors open at 12:30 AM and close at 1:30AM. For more information contact the KFLA United Way at 613-542-2674 or visit www.unitedwaykfla.ca

Sharbot Lake Seniors Home finds new owner

Sharbot Lake will have a new housing option for seniors next year. Hands have been wringing up and down Frontenac County ever since the Sharbot Lake Seniors' Home closed early in the summer of 2013. Seniors' housing is a community priority in Central Frontenac and a key component of the new Frontenac County Strategic Plan, and having a 30-bed facility closed and sitting on the real estate market belied the effectiveness of those efforts. All that changed late last week, when realtor Alison Robinson of Lake District Realty put up a "Sold" sign on the building. The really big news as far as she is concerned - and in this matter she speaks for herself and the building's soon to be former owner, Dr. Peter Bell - is that it will continue to serve the ageing population in Sharbot Lake and vicinity. “We really wanted to sell this property to someone who was not going to re-purpose the building, and even though all the big developers we talked to said that we would have to accept that, we are happy to say it will remain a residence for the senior population,” Robinson said after the sale was announced. Details about the nature of the new use for the home will be forthcoming later. The new owner, who is remaining anonymous for the time being, released the following statement: “Sharbot Lake Retirement (and Retreat) Ltd., is the operating entity that will be taking over the facility. We are currently in the renovation planning stages and will begin working on the facility soon. Once we have our vision and plan worked out, we will gladly release more information when it is appropriate to do so. We look forward to a happy and long community presence and want to thank everyone we have already met and those we will meet, for the warm and wonderful welcome to the community.” According to Robinson, the timelines that the new owner is working with are aggressive, the hope being to open in the spring or summer of 2015. After over a year of work trying to find a buyer, and a number of near misses, there was a hint of chance in the way the sale came about. “The daughter of the buyer's Toronto agent drove by the building. She knew her father had a client who was interested in a retirement home, so she phoned him. He gave me a call and we began the long process that led to the sale,” said Robinson. In the run-up to the Central Frontenac election, the successful sale of the seniors' home was drafted into the pitches of some of the candidates at an all- candidates meeting in Sharbot Lake on Monday night.

SOUTH FRONTENAC NEWS

Special service celebrates 165 years at St. Paul's United in Harrowsmith

Special service celebrates 165 years at St. Paul's United in Harrowsmith

A special service on October 19 at St. Paul's United Church in Harrowsmith marked the 165th year that the church has been a gathering place of worship for the local community in and around Harrowsmith. Rev. Patsy Henry was joined by guest preacher, retired United Church minister ...

Golden Eagles go one and one at the 2014 Bubba Bowl

A picturesque setting sun followed by a bright moon made this year’s Bubba Bowl on October 9 one to remember.. The main event was a double header where the Sydenham Golden Eagles took on the LaSalle Knights in two very exciting and close games, one going to Sydenham and the other to Lasalle. The Bubba Bowl, now in its ninth year, is named for Alex “Bubba” Turcotte, who played for three years as a member of Sydenham’s junior football team and sadly died of heart failure in May of 2001. The event continues to draw thousands of football fans from the local community and is popular both with former students at the school, some of whom played ball there, and others who just happen to be big fans of the Sydenham Golden Eagles and the game. Th Junior Golden Eagles and Kinghts taking to the field first. Though I was not able to stay for the games, coaches Mike Love and Jeff Ryan got me up to speed on how they unfolded. In the junior contest, Sydenham scored early in the first quarter in their opening drive, with Merrick Wilcock getting the touchdown. After missing a 2 point conversion, and with the score at 6-0 for Sydenham, LaSalle tied it up and their single point conversion brought them into the lead 7-6. In the second quarter both teams demonstrated strong defense, each making it difficult for the other team to score and the half the score was unchanged at 7-6 for LaSalle. Early in the third LaSalle put together a great drive and scored a touchdown and with a successful conversion spread their lead to 14-6. In the fourth Sydenham came back strong and in a long drive Shane Herron scored a touchdown, narrowing the score to 14-12 for LaSalle. The tensest part of the game happened next, when Sydenham's Colin Bowman went for a two point conversion that ended at the goal line, leading to a lengthy conference among the referees. In the end they decided that Bowman had not crossed the line, leaving the score at 14-12 for LaSalle. Sydenham then executed an onside kick recovering the ball on the Knights 40 yard line. The Golden Eagles then made a final attempt but their stalled after a failed fourth down attempt. LaSalle won the game with a final score of 14-12. Mike Love, Sydenham coach for the Senior Golden Eagles, provided a description of the game against the LaSalle seniors. He said it was “a very close and exciting contest”. Picking it up at the half time mark, the Golden Eagles were leading 7-6. Early in the third quarter Tom Withey of Sydenham intercepted a LaSalle pass and returned it for a toucdown. LaSalle responded quickly, scoring a touchdown and adding a two point conversion to tie the game 14-14. Late in the third Sydenham jumoed back into the lead when Sam Moyse scored on a long pass from Dylan Fisher, putting Sydenham into the lead 21-14 at the end of the third. Early in the last quarter Sydenham recovered a fumble and following a short drive to the line, Brodie Latimer scored a rushing touchdown from a yard out, bringing the score to 28-14. LaSalle fought back, though, recovering a fumble to score a touchdown with just one minute 30 seconds left in the fourth, closing Sydenham’s lead to 28-21. The Knights then attempted a short kick to get back possession but the Golden Eagles were quick to recover the ball. The Knights had a final chance with just 20 seconds left in the game but failed to get far enough to score. The senior Eagles have now won three in a row. The Junior Eagles are still trying for their first win of the season and are down three games. Congratulations to Dave Compton, who won the 50-50 draw, which he generously donated to SHS Athletics.

Pleasing art pairings at Sydenham's Grace Centre

Over 30 art lovers gathered at the Southern Frontenac Community Service Corporation’s Grace Centre for a stellar afternoon of great art, both in works and words thanks to two accomplished local artists, Wendy Cain and Margaret Hughes. While their works are in no way similar, hung side by side they represent two very different approaches to art, the results of which are surprisingly complementary. Margaret Hughes, a former potter and co-owner of Cornerstone, Kingston's premiere fine Canadian craft and Inuit art store, took up chalk pastels years ago. Enjoying their directness and rich hues she approaches painting like one would a lump of clay, digging right in and working in a very direct, hands- on way. As a result the works are fresh and vibrant, and burst forth in an explosion of colour. Her past as a potter is literally apparent in her compositions; her colorful functional ceramic pieces are included in many of her still lifes. Hughes creates her paintings by layering colour upon colour, often beginning on a black paper background. By allowing some of the black paper to show through, the colours have an added intensity. Pattern and surface decoration are key in these works, with rich, broad swaths of gorgeous colour lying side by side and portraying various table and wall coverings that boast rich plums, bright oranges, purples, blood reds and deep blacks and blues. These works are reminiscent of other colour and pattern-focused painters like Matisse and Cezanne, both of whom Hughes said are influences. In her talk Hughes spoke of her former work as a potter for 30 years and how working with coloured glazes eventually led her to pastels. “The interaction of having made the pots and then re-presenting them in a two-dimensional form as part of a still life composition presents a stimulating challenge and connects my current practice to my past.” Artist Wendy Cain, a printmaker/papermaker who teaches printmaking at the Ontario College of Art and Design in Toronto and who has participated in over 250 individual and group shows, spoke next. Cain developed her own pulp paper painting technique and currently works out of her studio in Newburg, Ont. Paper and printing making are more process-oriented art forms and Cain's works are crisp, clean and precise, with a certain lightness that makes her pieces appear effortless. In her presentation she demonstrated through slides the processes she uses, and it became clear that each piece involves numerous carefully pre-planned steps. Her most intriguing pieces include her homemade patterned papers, which form the backgrounds of the piece. These beautifully patterned background sections boast mainly fish and natural foliage motifs, on top of which are screen- printed, larger, more central images - things like Grecian urns and other subjects that lend the works a more cerebral quality. Cain likes to play with juxtaposing seemingly unrelated images in a single frame and this is what gives her work its edge. Considering how the images relate is part of the puzzle she seems to offer up to her viewers and as we learned from her talk, her work is always changing and developing. In contrast to these, some of her newest works involve actually using the pulp/paper mixture as paint by spraying it in layers and creating unique landscape pieces where swirling blue skies are often front and centre. The complementary nature of both artists’ work and their talks, which gave additional insight into the minds of these two creative and finely tuned artists, made for a very worth-while visit to the Grace Centre on Thanksgiving weekend. The show will be up until December 12 and many of the works are for sale.

Touring the Universe with Terence Dickinson

There is probably no better guide to lead a tour of the universe than celebrated Canadian astronomer, Terence Dickinson. Dickinson, who resides in Yarker, was invited to Prince Charles PS in Verona by Laurie Swinton, former chair of the parent council, to give an evening talk about the universe on October 2 to listeners of all ages with curious minds. Dickinson, who became fascinated by the stars at age five, has made an admirable career as a renowned astronomer and has authored 15 books on the subject including “Nightwatch: A Practical Guide to Viewing the Universe”, “The Backyard Astronomer’s Guide” and “Exploring the Night Sky”. For years he edited the magazine Astronomy and in 1995 he founded and is still editor of the Canadian astronomy magazine SkyNews. Over his career he has held numerous posts as staff astronomer at such places as the McLaughlin Planetarium in Toronto and was assistant director at the Strasenburgh Planetarium in Rochester, New York. He has won numerous honors and awards including a honorary PhD from the University of Trenton. He was also awarded the Order of Canada and has had an asteroid named after him. However, it is his passion for his subject and his ability to deliver information in understandable terms for all ages that made his appearance at PCPS such a treat. Dickinson used models to demonstrate the magnitude of the universe, inviting one youngster to hold a yellow golf ball representing our sun and inviting another to hold a second white ball representing the next nearest star system, Alpha Centauri. He informed the second youngster that he would have to take his white golf ball all the way to Winnipeg to give a true scale representation of its distance from our sun. Understanding the scope and size of the universe is a daunting task even for the most nimble minded. It is estimated that there are roughly 100 billion galaxies in the universe with each on average having 100 billion stars, which brings the estimated total numbers of stars in the universe to 10,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 stars (or 10 to the power of 22). While listeners were awed by what they heard, Dickinson also accompanied his talk with a slide show of equally awe-inspiring photos. One, a view of the earth as seen from the moon was particularly breathtaking. Following his talk he invited guests to view the moon on what thankfully was a perfectly clear night. He explained that with the strength of present-day telescopes, viewers that night in Verona could actually see the moon as close up as the astronauts who orbited it in space had seen it. He spoke of what a shame it is that in Toronto one cannot view the sky as he was able to as a boy in suburban Toronto so he is glad that in the more northern towns like Verona and those even further north, people are still able to enjoy dark skies and are doing their best to preserve and promote them. Dickinson hopes that his passion might ignite a flame in the young minds of local students and he will be returning to Prince Charles later in October to speak to the students about the subject he loves and knows best. By the way, those who have played the board game Trivial Pursuit have Terrence Dickinson to thank for most of the astronomy questions and answers found there. Photos- 2038-famed Canadian astronomer Terence Dickinson awed listeners at his talk “A Tour of the Universe” at Prince Charles PS in Verona on October 2 2042-a slide in his presentation shows earth as seen from the moon  

New students at Sydenham High School get their colours on at Gould Lake

Grade nine students at Sydenham High School participated in a special school orientation event at the Gould Lake Outdoor Centre on September 25, which geared them up for the school year. Organized by the school’s grade 11 recreational leadership class under the direction of SHS teacher Mark Richards, the event had students don their school colours and participate in a number of games and activities at eight different stations. The activities included potato sack races, tug-of-war and a number of other games. According to Mark Richards the annual event has two key aims. “It provides an opportunity for the grade nine students to get acquainted with their peers while having some fun and also gives the grade 11 students a chance to demonstrate their leadership skills.” The new students learned the SHS school song "Bobaloo", which no doubt will be heard at the annual Bubba Bowl tonight, Thursday, October 9 where Sydenham’s junior and senior Golden Eagles will be taking on the LaSalle Knights. The junior game kicks off at 6pm with the senior game to follow. Admission to the game is $2 and the canteen will be open. Proceeds from admission will be used to cover the cost of the event and to support SHS athletics.

FRONTENAC COUNTY NEWS

County OP delayed as consensus seeking continues

County OP delayed as consensus seeking continues

After 18 months of work, and three formal drafts, the Frontenac County Official Plan was set for approval at a meeting of Frontenac County Council last Wednesday (October 15). However the prospect of a split vote on the plan has forced a delay. The representatives on the council...

Community Paramedicine project in Frontenac and Kingston

Frontenac County is one of the recipients of $6 million in provincial funding for community paramedicine pilot projects. Community paramedicine is an attempt to make use of the skills and infrastructure of paramedic services to help serve the senior and chronically ill population before they require emergency services It has been pioneered in Ontario by the Renfrew County Paramedic services, which conducts wellness clinics and an ad hoc home visit program; offers an exercise program; has trained thousands of people in CPR (cardio pulmonary resuscitation); and more. Frontenac County will receive a total of $156,800 in funding over two years to establish a framework for future community paramedicine programs within the County of Frontenac and the City of Kingston. In announcing the funding, Frontenac County communications officer Alison Vandervelde described the project in the following way: “The research project will focus on identifying solutions that could provide a more cohesive healthcare system for the residents of Frontenac County and the City of Kingston and has four main areas of focus: wellness clinics, community paramedic home visits, paramedic referrals and improved communication links between paramedics and other health care providers.” The County applied for $195,000 in answer to the call for expressions of interest from the province. The main shortfall between the request and what was given is in salary dollars. Instead of the $116,000 that the county requested for a project developer, the province provided $83,000, which will fund the position for 18 months. The rest of the application was approved as requested, with the exception of a $5,000 request for money to cover legal fees, which was denied. In addition to the project developer's salary, $33,000 will be spent on project co-ordination. Only a small amount of the overall money that has been received will be directed to existing or new programming. $1,800 is earmarked for expanding the existing Wolfe Island Wellness Clinic project, and $3,900 will go towards a pilot wellness clinic project in the northern half of the county. Another $30,000 is to be spent covering wages for four-hour training sessions for 140 paramedics. The primary impetus of the project, in the words of the funding application, is to “establish a solid framework for future core Community Paramedicine Programs ... of critical importance is the development of a comprehensive communication plan, within the framework, between Paramedics and other healthcare providers.” Healthcare providers who will be contacted initially by the project developer, once they are hired, are the Community Care Access Centre, Rural Kingston Health Links, Kingston Health Link, Northern and Southern Frontenac Community Services, Kingston General Hospital, and the Local Health Integration Network. As part of the planning for the project, a staff member has been appointed by each of the above agencies to participate in the project. Gale Chevalier, Deputy Chief of Performance Standards with Frontenac County Paramedic Services, will oversee the project. “Our residents will benefit greatly from this funding,” said Warden Denis Doyle. “One of County Council’s strategic goals includes supporting our seniors’ efforts to safely age in their homes. This project will allow people to remain in their communities longer, maintaining their closeness to family and friends, and eliminate long travel times for routine preventative healthcare. Ultimately, this funding will make positive differences for our residents and enhance the strength and vitality of our communities.”

Seeking foster families for teens

Family and Children's Services of Frontenac, Lennox and Addington (FACSFLA) is searching the city and countryside alike for families who are able and willing to provide foster care for teenagers. FACSFLA, which is the new name for the 120-year-old Children's Aid Society, has a large cohort of teenagers under its care right now. According to Executive Director Steve Woodman, that includes 30 who would be best served in a positive foster home environment. The alternative to fostering for the teens is a group home environment, which, Woodman said, “does not provide the example of life in a family environment that can set up teenagers for a successful future. We currently have a number of teenagers in group homes who would be suitable for fostering, and that is why we are putting a call out for foster families now.” The shortfall is also the result of some changes the agency has recently made. Its new “Vision for Fostering and Adoption" puts family-based care at the forefront of service. Woodman's fear is that if new foster families are not found, some teens will have to be moved out of the region because of the limited number of group home spaces that are available. “Fostering is not for everyone,” Woodman, said, “but the changing face of fostering means it is open to different family structures, such as same sex families and one parent families.” The process of becoming a foster family takes about six months, and includes a home visit, financial and police checks, and a ten-week training program. With a goal of finding 30 families by March of next year, the call is going out now. “This is something that we can’t do without the community’s help. We need everyone’s help to find the foster parents we need,” said Woodman. “Even though we know most people don’t want to be foster parents, chances are most of us will know someone who could help. We’re asking people to spread the word and tell everyone they know.” For further information, go to FACSFLA.ca, phone 613-545-3227, or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.  

Idle Land? Plant Trees!

by Susan Moore Looking to plant trees on your land? Generous subsidies are available from Trees Ontario. And we supply the planting crew. Planting trees on your property can help fight climate change, increase wildlife habitat and improve water conservation. Trees Ontario is working with many tree planting partners across the province to deliver the Ontario government’s 50 Million Tree Program. Supporting landowners is our goal. Trees increase property values and improve the health of your land in so many ways. The 50 Million Tree Program makes planting very affordable. In most cases, about 75 percent of the costs will be borne by the program. Landowners with a productive area of one hectare or larger may be eligible. Planting trees can support farmers by strengthening landscape resilience. Trees can shelter livestock and help control stock movement; provide shelter for crops and assist with soil management; reduce flood risk; and boost pollinators. A Trees Ontario rep will work with you to find the best solution for your property. Planting windbreaks, pond edges or marginal land can improve your operation. Simple hedgerows are a benefit to both crops and wildlife. Contact Trees Ontario for a thoughtfully designed planting scheme tailored for your land, plus advice on tree maintenance and management. Ontario is committed to plant 50 million trees by 2025. Find out more about the program at www.treesontario.ca. Talk to local agent Tim Gray at 613-477-2981 or at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. for a planting consult. Idle land? Plant trees!

New federal Liberal candidate elected in LFK

Two Liberal gatherings took place on October 5 in the new federal riding of Lanark Frontenac Kingston to decide which of the two Phils, Phil Somers or Philippe Archambault, would become the new federal Liberal candidate for the riding. Former House leader, Peter Milliken, chaired both meetings, the first at Sydenham's Grace Centre and the second at the Perth Civitan Hall, where each of the two candidates gave their final speeches leading up the vote. At 5:30pm after the total of 222 ballots had been counted, both candidates were called outside of main hall at the Civitan hall in Perth and minutes later both re-entered, one with both arms raised above his head, celebrating his victory. Philippe Archambault was invited to the podium first to make his victory speech and after first thanking his wife Melanie, his team, supporters and his fellow candidate Phil Somers, he reiterated much from his earlier speeches in the day. Archambault emphasized the need in moving forward to work together to make progress in a number of areas, including increasing employment opportunities, creating more housing and health care initiatives, increasing support for elders living at home, protection of the environment, and creating more opportunities for youth and young adults. He ended by stressing the need for members of the party to come together to create a single united front. “Scott Reid will not be easy to get out in 2015 and we will need to use the newest technology and to reach out to younger voters. I think it is very feasible that we can win this riding. We have a great leader in Justin (Trudeau). We will build a great team and we will work hard together and I promise that I will do everything I can to beat Scott Reid in the next election,” Archambault said, to much applause. Phil Somers spoke next and thanked his family, his team and supporters. He congratulated Archambault for conducting such a “strong and positive campaign”. Somers geared his campaign to what he described as the issues that matter most to people in this riding, namely restoring democracy in Ottawa and said he enjoyed his campaign experience. He encouraged all of his volunteers and supporters to “get behind Archambault in order to win the riding in the 2015 election”. He spoke of the importance of signing up new party members as soon as possible and said that he is “so passionate about getting Stephen Harper out of Ottawa that he will continue to work hard to win this riding for the Liberals.” Following the announcement of his win, Archambault told me he felt that it was a tight race and that the vote could have gone either way. “I definitely know that I came from behind since I entered the race in February whereas Phil Somers had a two-year head start on me. Still, that being said, I had a good feeling from the start and knew that I had support and know that I worked hard for this.” Archambault said he feels confident about winning the riding in the upcoming 2015 federal election. “This is just the beginning. If we work hard and talk to people and put out the Liberal message I think that we will have a good chance to beat Scott Reid, who has been the MP is this riding for the last 14 years.” As far as celebrating his win, Archambault said that he would heading home, would talk with his wife and would be getting up early to make lunches for his young children. Basically he said he “would be getting back into the family routine and working full time”.

ADDINGTON HIGHLANDS NEWS

“Flickr”-ing the past into the present at the Cloyne and District Historical Society

“Flickr”-ing the past into the present at the Cloyne and District Historical Society

As a means of gathering more historic photos and documents as well as making their current collection more accessible to the world at large, members of the Cloyne and District Historical Society (CDHS) engaged the know-how of one of their members, who is well versed in the workin...

NAEC students feel the beat

by Valerie Allan Students and staff found their rhythm at high energy, fun workshops presented by Derek De Beers on Friday, October 17. Derek brought a large assortment of drums and other percussion instruments such as shakers, odd contraptions involving pedals and instruments, and basketballs. Students and staff learned from Derek that “You think you are drumming, but you are really doing mathematics. You are adding, subtracting, dividing and multiplying. You are counting.” He added that mathematics is important in life, when people have to consider how much rent they pay, their hydro, their gas bill, etc. Teachers were very pleased that Derek highlighted the importance of mathematics. However, Derek also stressed that without the Arts, students’ “souls would wither and die.” Derek stated that students need a combination of the right brain and the left brain to be successful. Derek’s workshops were full of fun and drumming. One particularly amusing aspect was Derek’s assigning random names to students and teachers. Due to the very large numbers of participants, it would have been impossible for him to learn everyone’s name, so this was a clever way to still make a connection with the attendees. The workshop was made possible by a subsidy from the Crabtree Foundation, which subsidized the “Bboyizm” workshop held last year. Students and teachers both enthused over how much fun they had had, and several said they would love it if Derek were to come again  

Congregate dining – a benefit to a senior's health

by Sonja Alcock Coming together for a meal is a common occurrence. Often the first date for a new budding couple is dinner and a movie - sharing time together in order to get to know one another better. This sometimes leads to more dates, more meals, partnering together for life “until death do us part”. And once that “parting” happens, often the one left behind is left with trying to cope with life without their mate….the one for whom they either cooked, or was lovingly cooked for. I know that when my husband is not home, I seldom cook a full meal. And I know that when I’m away, he will eat hot dogs only! Not healthy meals at all - not like what I would have made for us every day. The same is true for widows/widowers/single elderly or older couples. Why bother cooking something that takes time just for only one person to eat. We often fall into that “Tea & Toast Syndrome”. So coming together with others during the week to enjoy not only a healthy meal, but a wonderful social interaction is a benefit to the well being of every senior, whether still married or single. This is the time when friendships are made; when others learn to care for one another in a deeper way; where contacts are made. Here is when we learn the ups and downs of each other’s lives, and often what illnesses are happening so they can “take care of each other”. “How is your chest cold today, Eddie?” “Did you see the doctor last week for your checkup?” Basically keeping tabs on one another. Congregate Dining is happening all around us every day. Inviting someone over to lunch, dinner - or meeting somewhere for coffee. And here in the Land O’ Lakes area, Land O’ Lakes Community Services (LOLCS) provide two programs for seniors to come together for food and friendship: every Tuesday in Flinton, and every first Monday of the month in Denbigh. A time where friends meet to play games, exercise and then have a great meal cooked by loving volunteers who make nutritional meals that not only consider the health of each person, but taste buds as well! I met a woman in the grocery store a few weeks back who is a volunteer cook. There was a sale on butter and she was there buying as much as she could because she wanted to make the best tasting meal for those she cooks for. Her devotion speaks volumes to me. There are 14 volunteer cooks with LOLCS Diner’s Club and Adult Drop In, serving 50+ people in Denbigh, and 80+ people in Flinton. Other volunteers plan menus, shop, cook, serve, clean up and lead exercises. Without our many volunteers, LOLCS would not be able to make this wonderful program function as well as it does. Knowing this means that you will be with people with loving and caring hearts. If you are interested in participating in these wonderful programs, but do not know how to go about it, please contact Pam Lemke at 613-336-8934, ext 229 at the LOLCS office in Northbrook or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Adult Drop-In meets every Tuesday at the Flinton Hall in Flinton. It is a wonderful opportunity for social time, mild music & card games or just visiting with others. Begins at 9:30 a.m. with a hot, nutritious lunch prepared and served by volunteers. Cost is only $7 for the meal. And you are more than welcome to come just for the social time without having the meal at no cost at all except gaining a friendship. Denbigh Diners Club meets in Denbigh at the Community Centre on the first Monday of every month, except when it’s a holiday; then it’s the following Monday. Once again the cost is only $7 for the meal. Gift Certificates are available for the above at the LOLCS office in Northbrook. If you are unable to attend because of transportation issues, LOLCS has that covered too, so please call and let them help you make some new friends for life.

Mold Issues Force Aboriginal Housing Tenant From Home

Danielle Pollard and her young daughter live in a subsidised rental house in Kaladar that is provided by Ontario Aboriginal Housing Services, an agency that is based in Sault Ste. Marie, and has rental properties throughout the province. That is, she lived in the house until late September when she found that the air in the house had taken on a sour, moldy smell, and found that some of the walls of the house, all her furniture and other possessions were covered in a light grey mold. She is now staying with her mother and ailing father at their small home in Northbrook. When I met her at the house last week, it appeared spotlessly clean inside because much of the mold had been washed off, but it persisted on the beds and some other spots. However, the smell of mold was immediately apparent as soon as I entered the house. “Part of my frustration comes from the fact that I moved to this house because I had to leave the previous Aboriginal Services house that I lived in in Northbrook, because the mold in the basement was so bad it made the house unliveable and ruined half of my furniture,” Pollard said. “So I moved in here, and they told me the house was mold free but it isn't anymore.” “What I want to know is whether the house is safe to live in and whether I can clean some of my furniture or does it all have to go,” she said. Matt Doyle of the Kingston Frontenac Public Health Unit did an inspection of the house and in his letter of opinion he said any materials in the house that are porous and can not go through a washing machine, need to be replaced. That would include the couch and chairs and almost all of the furniture, which is made of wood. Pollard said that repeated requests for service to Aboriginal Housing Services have only resulted in inspections, but the results of those inspections have not been shared with her and no commitment to a remedy has been made. “I've now been out of the house for almost a month, and I don't see that changing,” said Pollard, “and if I do have to replace all my furniture - how I am going to replace it?” she said. An air quality test was ordered by Aboriginal Housing and was done early last week at the house, and last weekend an inspection was done by the Ministry of Housing Inspection and Enforcement Board on Pollard's request. Results of those tests should have been delivered to the regional office of Aboriginal Housing in Peterborough, but calls from Pollard and a subsequent call on Tuesday by the Frontenac News have not been answered. This is not the first time mold has been an issue in the house. According to Mike Powley, the Kaladar waste site attendant, the furniture and other possessions of the previous tenant in the building ended up in landfill because “they were covered in grey mold.” Ontario Aboriginal Housing operates nine units in Addington Highlands, 13 in North Frontenac, 19 in Central Frontenac, four in South Frontenac, nine in Stone Mills, and 13 in Lanark Highlands.

Trick or Eat!

Submitted by NAEC The students of North Addington Education Centre will be suiting up in their Campbell’s Soup costumes on October 31 and knocking on your door! They will be asking for non-perishable food items which will be donated to the local food bank, which is experiencing a shortage of food. About a dozen secondary students will be spreading out between Flinton, Northbrook, and Cloyne to collect non-perishable food items, instead of tricking or treating for candy.  The students are not strangers to supporting the community who supports them. This is the fourth year for the very successful event. We’re asking community members to contribute what they can. We will be having three to four students canvassing each community between approximately 5:00 and 8:00pm. They will be wearing NAEC ID tags and a very large smile. We are going to visit as many households as possible, but if you have contributions and the food is not picked up, please call Candice Bovard throughout the week at 613-336-8991 and we will pick it up. On behalf of students and staff, the principal, Angela Salmond, would like to thank the community for their contributions to our food drive efforts over the years: “The response we have received is overwhelming. We would not be able to organize events like this without the support of very generous families in this community. I am proud to see students take ownership of the area in which they live and recognize what really matters”. If you see students in the community and they are ‘trick or eating’, feel free to ask them to sing or dance for your donation; they are prepared to work for your generosity!

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