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Featured News

Slow cooking at Prince Charles P.S.

Slow cooking at Prince Charles P.S.

In an effort to teach practical life skills to students in the Limestone District School Board (LDSB), a new pilot project called Slow Cookers for Kids was launched at three Kingston area schools, and...

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Mary Howes: Tichborne girl makes a go of it in Parham

Mary Howes: Tichborne girl makes a go of it in Parham

Written By: Jeff Green | Published: March-05-2015 | Category: 150 Years Anniversary
Tagged Under: Parham, Frontenac150, People

Long before Mary Howes had established herself as a major force in local and regional organisations, she was a young girl from Tichborne who had been raised in a great aunt and uncle's house, near the...

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Three Verona artists at the Grace Centre

Three Verona artists at the Grace Centre

Written By: Julie Druker | Published: March-05-2015 | Category: SOUTH FRONTENAC
Tagged Under: Grace Centre, Arts & Culture, Sydenham

In their ongoing efforts to showcase the work of local artists, the Grace Centre Arts Committee held a special artists talk and reception at the Grace Centre in Sydenham on March 1. Three artists, Ela...

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First time Ride for Dad-a success in Snow Road

First time Ride for Dad-a success in Snow Road

Organizers of the first ever Ride For Dad snowmobile event in the Ontario Federation of Snowmobile Clubs' (OFSC) District 1, which took place at the Snow Road Snowmobile Club on February 28, were thri...

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11th Annual Big Gull Derby-family fishing at its best

11th Annual Big Gull Derby-family fishing at its best

More than 400 tickets were sold at the Frontenac-Addington Trappers Council's annual fishing derby on February 28. The weather cooperated for this year’s event, which since its inception over a decade...

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Addington Highlands Council

300 megawatt wind power project proposed for Addington Highlands/North Frontenac It seems that ever...

South Frontenac Council

Loughborough Lake Association raises lake capacity issue in Johnston Point development by Wilma Ken...

Sharbot Lake Farmers Market to grow

by Mary de Bassecourt, SLFM Market Manager Eager and enthusiastic farmers attended the Sharbot Lake...

What's next at North Frontenac Little Theatre

by Pat Fisher It's a musical. It has a big cast - actors of all ages. It will be staged the first t...

Polar Bear Plunge- better late than never

For those adverse to the idea of plunging into an icy Sharbot Lake in February, reversing the old ad...

Mary Lake to retire after 27 years as Director of Care at Fairmount Home.

The one constant at Fairmount Home, through all its renovations and changes, from a 96-bed municipal...

Sing 'N Strings leaves concert goers smiling

By Jonathan Davies Around 70 people turned out to the Kingston Christian Fellowship Church on Febru...

Dutch immigrant makes his mark on Wolfe Island

When Jan Hassler was 19 years old, he decided to leave his native Holland and seek a new life in Can...

History revealed at the Bedford Historical Research Centre

Close to 100 history buffs attended the annual Bedford District Historical Research Centre's open ho...

A brief history of the Sedore family in Flinton

At their monthly meeting at Cloyne's Barrie hall on February 16, Shirley Sedore presented a talk on ...

50 STORIES 150 YEARS

Mary Howes: Tichborne girl makes a go of it in Parham

Mary Howes: Tichborne girl makes a go of it in Parham

Long before Mary Howes had established herself as a major force in local and regional organisations, she was a young girl from Tichborne who had been raised in a great aunt and uncle's house, near the rail station. After high school she went to Toronto to work, living at another...

Mary Lake to retire after 27 years as Director of Care at Fairmount Home.

The one constant at Fairmount Home, through all its renovations and changes, from a 96-bed municipal home for the aged, to a Class D and then a Class A nursing home with 128 beds, has been the smiling face of Mary Lake. As director of care, Lake has watched over the residents at Fairmount through all those years, and she will retire at the end of this week. “I literally grew up in long-term care,” she said in an interview on Monday. Not only has she worked in long-term care for over 40 years, she started working summers in a nursing home when she was a young teenager. “My grandmother owned the Picton Manor, and as soon as school let out each summer I would head over there to work. I changed beds, did cleaning, whatever was needed.” A lifelong Frontenac County resident, Mary Lake was raised at Elginburg (in what was then Pittsburgh Township), where she attended public school. She went to Sydenham High School, and then studied Nursing at the Kingston General Hospital (KGH) School of Nursing. After graduating in 1972, she took a job at KGH. In 1974, she started working as a long-term care nurse, and aside from a short stint at Kingston's Prison for Women in 1984 (as a nurse not an inmate) she has remained working in long-term care ever since. She took on the job of director of care at the municipally owned Fairmount Home for the Aged in 1987. She has seen a lot of changes at Fairmount over the years. When she first started there, the home was licensed, and funded by the Ministry of Community and Social Services, not the Ministry of Health, which now oversees all long-term care facilities under a single set of rules under the Long Term Care Act of 2007. “We were a country home, and we served the residents of Frontenac County mostly, at that time. The care we delivered was always excellent, but the facility was not what it was today,” she said. All of the rooms at Fairmount had two beds, and the rooms did not have private bathrooms or showers. It was more of a dormitory-style facility with a single dining room for all 96 residents. Improvements to the level of care came with new standards of care in the 1990s. As director of care, Lake was in charge of operations at the home, including nursing and personal support workers as well as all of the support staff in the home. The administration of Fairmount was taken care of by Frontenac County. She helped the home maintain its reputation as a caring facility, for families and residents to feel safe and well supported. When municipal amalgamation took place in the late 1990s, Frontenac County decided to keep Fairmount Home, even though its location was becoming subsumed by the City of Kingston when it annexed Pittsburgh and Kingston Townships. The Chief Administrators of the new County, first Bob Foulds and later Elizabeth Savill, became administrators of Fairmount, giving Mary Lake someone to report directly to. When all long-term care facilities started to come under the same set of standards and regulations, Fairmount was designated as a Class D facility because of the physical limitations of the home. It was faced with a choice to upgrade or close, and this led to a long, sometimes difficult, set of negotiations with the City of Kingston and the province, funding partners of Fairmount, over plans to renovate. The $17 million upgrade eventually got underway in 2003, and this led to a challenging period for Lake as director of care, ensuring that residents were well cared for and as well prepared as possible for the changes that took place. “Through attrition we dropped to 78 beds, and when the new section was completed, the residents all moved there as the old section was completely retrofitted. In 2004 everything was complete and we became the 128-bed facility that we are today,” said Lake. Once the new state of the art facility was complete, a new challenge faced Mary Lake. “We had to get used to the change, and change is difficult, even positive change. We lost our culture of care for a while when the new Fairmount opened. Our staff took some time to transition, but we worked hard at it and we got it back. It took about a year,” she said. Aside from the physical changes in the early 2000s, the home also acquired a full time administrator. Under the regulations, Class A municipal homes must have a full time administrator and full time director of care. “If I ever wanted to be an administrator,” Lake said, "I would have been one, but I always wanted to be involved in the service end of things. I never wanted to have any other job than the one I kept.” Ironically, however, that is the role she is retiring from. She has been filling in for Julie Shillington, the full time administrator, who has been on a leave of absence for health reasons and will not return until later this year. As Lake looks back at her career, she says that while tightened up regulations were a good change in long term care, the ministry has gone too far, leaving homes with more concerns about rules and less time for care. “They have really gone too far with regulations, because there isn't enough staff available to cover all the requirements and still provide the kind of care that we all want to provide. That is why we came into long term care in the first place, not just to comply with regulations but because we want to provide care,” she said. Another issue faced by the home is the push for ageing at home, which Lake said is a good thing. However it has meant that people do not come into care until they are at a point where their needs are greater. As well, there is pressure on Fairmount, and other homes, to provide care for patients with mental health issues that are more severe than the home can handle. “There is a gap in the health care system for these people and they get shuffled around,” she said. One of Mary Lake's major professional and volunteer interests is providing service to those suffering from dementia. Many of the residents at Fairmount have dementia of varying forms and levels of severity. The home has a wing devoted to those with advanced dementia. She has been a board member for years with the Alzheimer's Society and has volunteered with Southern Frontenac Community Services to run Alzheimer's support services. “It is very trying on families, on other residents at Fairmount, and of course on those with dementia themselves and the staff who care for them,” she said, “but we have learned. The drugs are better and the techniques for helping people have advanced over the years,” she said. While she said she has no plans for retirement other than a summer at the cottage, it will be impossible for her to stay completely away from her calling. She expects that by next fall she will be looking for a part-time volunteer role doing something. No doubt it will involve looking after people in some capacity or another.

Dutch immigrant makes his mark on Wolfe Island

When Jan Hassler was 19 years old, he decided to leave his native Holland and seek a new life in Canada. One of the reasons he left was that after living through World War 2, he was facing the obligation to join the Dutch army and be deployed to Indonesia to defend Dutch colonial interests. Instead he applied to come to Canada, and that led him to Wolfe Island. At that time, in order to migrate to Canada, sponsors were needed. A Wolfe Island fishing lodge owner, Jack Campbell, needed a hired hand, so Jan Hassler was sent to work for him. After one year he had fulfilled that commitment and he was free to make his life in Canada. Although he did travel around the country he ended up making his life on Wolfe Island, even if he knew from the start that Wolfe Islanders took family history on the island pretty seriously. “Wolfe Island is Wolfe Island, and the residents here - they thought they were the only Wolfe Islanders. A couple of them told me, you know, you'll never be a Wolfe Islander unless your grandparents are buried here. So I said, I'll tell you what I'll do. If I like it and stay here, then maybe I'll have them shipped over,” he said, during an interview from his house in Marysville on a cold, blustery day this past January. In 1962, he was working in Kingston in financial services when he was drawn back to the island to work with his brothers-in-law at the General Wolfe Hotel, which he managed until 1977. At that time he purchased a fishing lodge, Hitchcock House, and he kept that business until 2010. After establishing himself as a Wolfe Island resident, raising a family, and becoming part of the business community, he was approached to join Wolfe Island Council, which he did in 1985. He served a term as a councilor, a term as deputy reeve, two terms as reeve and a term as the first ever mayor of Frontenac Islands between 1998 and 2000. He was the warden of Frontenac County in 1997, the year before municipal amalgamation. That put him into the middle of a lot of different political debates on the island, and throughout the County. “A lot of things were shaken up in the 1990s. One was the idea of making Wolfe Islanders pay for the ferry. It was Gilles Poulliot [Minister of Transportation under the Bob Rae NDP government] who first came to us and asked if we would mind paying a bit of money for the ferry, maybe a loonie or a toonie. We said that might be ok but what if it goes up to $5 or $10 in a few years? A number of ministers came and went and we kept saying we didn't want it of course, but the idea didn't go away. In fact I think they even printed up tickets. They're probably in a warehouse somewhere in Kingston still. Then I got a call from Tony Clement, minister under Mike Harris, asking me to come to Toronto, where he said ‘I have good news for you, the fee is not coming in.’” When municipal amalgamation was forced on Ontario townships, Hassler and the Wolfe Island Council had some decisions to make. The question of whom to join was paramount. “We talked to Pittsburgh Township about joining with them and forming a new township, and the idea of Howe Island joining with Gananoque also came up. But when Pittsburgh joined with Kingston we were left with a choice between Kingston and remaining with Frontenac County,” he said. His fear about Kingston was that Wolfe Island, or even all the islands together, would become a single ward in the new City. “That would have left us with one vote out of 12 on Council, and no independence,” he said. “As far as I was concerned that was not an option.” In the end the Frontenac Islands were the last to sign on to join the Frontenac Management Board (which became Frontenac County again a few years later.) “At the end everybody had agreed but I hadn't agreed. If I had decided Wolfe Island is not going to go for it, the whole thing would have fallen apart. I said yes as you know. It wasn't a perfect marriage but I don't think there are any perfect marriages. I think we made the right choice.” One project that he still looks on with pride from his years on council was the construction of the new Wolfe Island branch of the Kingston Frontenac Public Library, which was built under his watch and was recently dedicated to his predecessor as reeve of Wolfe Island, the late Timothy O'Shea, who served for 33 years from 1959 to 1991. Jan Hassler is retired now, but he continues to keep an eye on comings and goings on Wolfe Island, and when pressed, he still gets animated about a topic that is a perennial controversy on the island, the possibility of a bridge to Kingston. “You never worked on a bridge?” I asked as we were at the end of our interview and thinking about timing our return to the mainland to meet the afternoon ferry schedule. “Don't ask me about a bridge,” he said. “It's been years since I thought about this bridge business. When we looked at it years ago, it would have cost $50 million to build a bridge and it was costing almost $10 million each year to run the ferry. Anyone who studied math even a little bit can tell that a bridge is cheaper in the long run, and it would not take that long to pay off, but someone has to invest in the first place. “Even if a bridge costs $100 million it will still pay off. They are talking about spending $75 million on a bigger ferry. But I never could get anyone to take a bridge project seriously, and there are those on the islands who are opposed and will always be opposed. So I don't think about it anymore.”

History revealed at the Bedford Historical Research Centre

Close to 100 history buffs attended the annual Bedford District Historical Research Centre's open house at the Glendower hall near Godfrey on February 21. The event included numerous displays of archival information, historical photos, maps and more. In addition, 10 local vendors and collectors set up booths advertising their wares and services. The open house offered local residents the chance to delve into not just their own family histories but also the rich local history of the area. The Bedford Historical Committee has been actively preserving that history for roughly 15 years, when the center's former chair and founder, June Quinn (who since passed away), began collecting, preserving and cataloging local artifacts. Gerald Stinson, who has been chairing the committee for the last four years, said that the aim of the annual open house is to promote the center and the local artisans and service providers in the area. The historical displays included in depth histories of close to 40 local families, beginning in 1861, such as the Babcooks, the Corcorans of Godfrey, the Kellys of Fish Creek Road and others One display included a history of the various cheese factories in the area, along with numerous photos and information about the 11 former schools located in Bedford district. None of them are still operating today but four are still standing. Other displays included a large historical map of the area pinpointing the families that first settled each individual lot and concession in the Township of Bedford beginning in the early 1800's. Another postal map circa 1879 defines the stagecoach mail routes from that time. Stinson said that many visitors came to look into their family histories and that the center's archives have a wealth of that kind of information. “Basically anyone looking for information about a resident of Bedford at any time, from the district's first settlers to the present, will likely find that name here somewhere.” One local family, the Maddens, who were on hand advertising their Eco Tree Care Service, used part of their day to do a bit of family tree digging of their own. The Madden family has roots that go back to the district's first settlers; their great, great, great, grandfather, John Madden of Ireland, settled in Burridge in 1823. Jimmy Madden said he believes that John Madden first arrived in Nova Scotia from Ireland then traveled through northern New York before finally settling in Frontenac County. At that time, 50-100 acre parcels of land were being granted to civilians. That first John Madden settled 50 acres that were located on Burridge Road and Firehall roads. Though the original farm burned down in the late 1800s, at that time John's son, also John, moved into an adjacent property, formerly the Edward Leary property. He built the home that Jimmy's father, Jim Madden, grew up in and where Jimmy currently lives with his family. The Maddens also took time to peruse a copy of the Bedford Township Census from 1861-1911 and came upon some new information about a previously unknown member of their family. “We just found out today about Mary, a sister of our great, great grandfather, who was born in 1841 in Burridge and who lived there until her early 20s. However, then she disappeared from the census for what could be any number of reasons." Jimmy Madden mused about the fact that he and his family members continue to this day to live and work off the land where his ancestors also did the same. “We (the Maddens) are very much the products not only of our ancestors but also our environment and it's amazing to think that our livelihoods are still to this day sourced by the local environment.” The Maddens' findings on Saturday demonstrated how the Bedford Historical Research Centre contains countless hidden treasures that are just waiting to be uncovered by local residents who take the time to dig into the rich history of Bedford District. For more information about the society email Gerald Stinson at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

A sneak peek at winning 150th Anniversary quilt

Local quilter, Debbie Emery of Plevna, won the quilt design competition put on by Frontenac County in August last year in their effort to have a unique quilt designed and created to celebrate the County’s 150th Anniversary. Emery, who moved to Plevna over six years ago, has been quilting for close to seven years. She found out about her win just before Christmas and said that since she does not feel she is “an artist”, she was a bit surprised. At the same time, though, she feels that she did her research well and knew, going into the competition, that she had some pretty good ideas for the project. She said it was her first time entering a competition and that she was thrilled to have her design chosen. The competition was judged by well-known local quilters/fibre artists Bethany Garner and Beth Abbott. Emery describes her winning design as a “story quilt”, one that “reflects the unique culture and people of Frontenac County from the past, present and into the future.” The quilt, which will measure 48 x 60 inches, will incorporate multiple quilting techniques including appliqué, embroidery and hand quilting. Emery chose different subject matters to represent the various regions of North, Central and South Frontenac and said that she focused on the unique histories and characteristics of each part of the county to show their diversity. For the north she will depict Bon Echo Provincial Park and the Dark Skies, the latter of which she says “brings the north into the future”. In Central Frontenac she is focusing on the history of the railroads and will create a steam engine as well as elements of the area’s farming and logging history. In the south she has chosen to depict the windmills of Wolfe Island and also a lighthouse to show the proximity of the southern most portions of the county to Lake Ontario. In order to incorporate some of the more general aspects of the area as a whole, the quilt will feature some historic architecture including an old church, and school and a log cabin. Emery said that she also wanted to include the Aboriginal history of the area and she has included in her design an Aboriginal woman, a teepee and the wild rice of Ardoch Lake, the latter of which recalls the historic stand off between locals and the government in the 1970's. Emery said that she is honored to have had her design chosen. “To know that it will be hanging in the County offices and people will be seeing it well into the future is quite exciting for me,” she said. Judging by the sample section that she had on display at the Frontenac Heritage Festival’s craft show at St. James Major Catholic Church hall on the weekend, her win is no doubt well deserved and she said it has definitely “got her creative juices flowing.” Emery’s quilt will be unveiled at the official opening of the 150th ceremonies, which will take place in Harrowsmith from August 28 to 30. After its unveiling the quilt will be hung at the offices of Frontenac County near Battersea. Emery also makes and sells various fashionable accessories from her home in Plevna. For more information, contact her at 613-479-8057.

NORTH FRONTENAC NEWS

First time Ride for Dad-a success in Snow Road

First time Ride for Dad-a success in Snow Road

Organizers of the first ever Ride For Dad snowmobile event in the Ontario Federation of Snowmobile Clubs' (OFSC) District 1, which took place at the Snow Road Snowmobile Club on February 28, were thrilled with the turn out. The event is a fundraiser for the fight against prostate...

North Frontenac Council - February 20, 2015

Protection of wetland and water quality paramount in Ardoch Lake decision. Frontenac County planner Joe Gallivan provided council with an update on two contentious issues at last Friday's (February 20) meeting in Plevna. First up was his presentation on the proposed 34-lot plan of condominium on Ardoch Lake. This development plan has been in the works for about seven years and has been through many changes since it was first submitted. With each change, the number of waterfront lots permitted has been reduced. At a well-attended public meeting on August 27, 2014 a number of concerns were raised about the impact of this development on the lake. One of the unique aspects of this specific plan is the ecological sensitivity of the property, which contains a large wetland. Gallivan explained that this wetland is home to “...the only heron rookery, according to the [Ministry of Natural Resources] in Eastern Ontario.” Gallivan said that the developer is “prepared to reduce the number of lots on the water and in particular the lots that are close to the wetland and the lots that are more challenging to develop” which would mean beginning the construction of condominiums on the west end of the property first and putting those to the east in a “holding zone”. These sites would allow for the necessary 30 metre setback from the waterfront and would provide enough space to install septic systems behind the residences, creating a further setback from the shoreline. Pending successful water quality tests and bylaw compliance, the developer would then be given the green light to continue with the adapted project in phases. “If the systems are working the way they're supposed to be then this potential holding zone could be lifted and they could proceed with developing [the area closer to the wetland]” Gallivan said. The developer proposed to install a new “high-end septic system,” which is currently being quality-tested in Quebec, but Gallivan said there is no absolute guarantee that these systems won't cause problems in the future. Councilor Fred Perry wondered about the possibility of skipping over building lots during the first phase of developing the western part of the property. “If we staged lots 1, 3, 6,...leaving holes in the centre, during [phase 1] would that not help? If something fails then at least you'd have room to manoeuvre with development down the road.” Gallivan agreed that it was a good suggestion and would relay that idea to the applicant's planner. There is a worry that imposing too many restrictions will push the developer to appeal the matter to the Ontario Municipal Board (OMB) and once that happens the municipality would lose their ability to control the process. Gallivan explained, “The board starts brand new and the board makes the decision and it's a time-consuming and expensive process.” Councilor John Inglis asked Gallivan “Do you have a sense whether we are getting near a tipping point [from the developer's side] in terms of viability of the project?” Gallivan responded “Yes.” “They've got to reduce the [number of] lots...and make sure there is protection,” Gallivan said. “I had a really good discussion with their planner and he understands this. He heard the public meeting loud and clear as well... It's an evolution...it continues to improve in terms of its impact on the lake.” Private lane development crucial for growth in the Frontenacs Joe Gallivan also briefed Council on restrictions that are being proposed by the Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing (MMAH) on the County's Official Plan (OP) regarding development on private lanes. Gallivan said County Council has given him the go-ahead to do a study on this issue in hopes that it will “provide some planning tools and some legal tools to look at allowing development on some private roads. The position of the ministry is, in my professional opinion, too black and white. There needs to be an understanding that there is potential, depending on the length of the road, the topography, the capacity of the lake, to allow us to continue [developing]." The County has done some analysis. The total value of property assessment in the County is $5 billion and of that, $2 billion is on private roads. “Development on private roads means a lot to the financial stability of the townships,” he said. “We're going to take the ministry on,” Gallivan said. If the MMAH will not yield on these policies Gallivan will be recommending that council appeal the decision to the OMB. He hopes that his study on private roads will be a new tool to fight the decision with. He is suggesting that North Frontenac Council maintain its stance on private roads in response to the MMAH's revision of its own draft Official Plan. Once the County's OP is approved, which Gallivan hopes will be by the end of 2015, any plans or amendments to the township OP goes to County Council for final approval instead of the MMAH, which Gallivan said would be “a positive thing.” Gallivan expressed confidence that if the private lane issue goes to the OMB, the county will win. Councilor Wayne Good wondered if it would be beneficial to the County to work with neighbouring counties in opposition to the MMAH's proposed restrictions. Gallivan said Lanark Highlands has taken the MMAH to the OMB over the same private roads amendment to their own Official Plan. “Lanark Highlands is standing alone right now against the ministry ... It really needs to be challenged from a regional perspective. “We're counting on you, Joe” Councilor Inglis said. “I'm prepared to take them on,” Gallivan replied. “It's very frustrating. The positions the ministry takes sometimes are a blanket position that they're applying across the province the same way and that's just not right.”

North Frontenac Council

5.29% increase on tap for North Frontenac ratepayers It was a long day for councilors at North Frontenac's special budget meeting on February 17. Treasurer Angela Millar presented the draft budget and Council spent the day going through it with a fine-toothed comb. Looking to cut the fat where they could, they approved, in principle, a new budget that will mean a 5.29% increase in the total to be raised from North Frontenac residents as compared to last year, or a $274,820 increase in actual dollars. However, the increase in the assessed value of North Frontenac properties will mean a 0.52% decrease in the tax rate at the township level. Councilor Inglis was concerned about whether the assessment funds were higher because of new construction or just re-assessment. “If [the increase] was entirely due to everybody's houses being re-assessed then you don't have an argument to increase their taxes,” Inglis said. Policing is the biggest challenge for North Frontenac Township as they begin to shoulder the cost increase in policing by the OPP. Policing will cost North Frontenac residents $365,996 this year, up from $230,000 in 2013, representing 45% of the increase in township taxation. OPP costs will grow to $845,817 by 2019. “Who are the crooks in this community?” Councilor Gerry Martin asked jokingly. Mayor Ron Higgins plans to ask Frontenac County about commissioning a study on sharing policing and fire services throughout the Frontenacs, in hopes that there might be some way to reduce future costs associated with these services. Councilor Denis Bedard was in agreement, saying, “If we could share services in terms of tendering equipment...if we have to tender a tanker for example, and we can tender two or three at the same time...I'm sure that could be coordinated. There is a huge cost savings in something like that. If you're buying three tankers from the manufacturers instead of one....” Treasurer Millar's presentation pointed out increases in WSIB fees and heating costs, along with the policing expenses. She also highlighted a decrease in fuel costs, and over $12,000 in savings on hydro. A big portion of those savings comes from the L.E.D. streetlights that Corey Klatt, the Manager of Community Development, installed throughout the township. Treasurer Millar said, “It's proven to be a real positive thing for us to do. We're seeing a huge savings.” As well, there was revenue generated from the MicroFit program, which brought in over $5,000 of revenue from the solar panel array on the roof of the township office. It was evident that the size, and remoteness, of the township creates a serious problem when budgeting. Animal Control, for instance, is projected to lose over $6,000 this year because the closest service provider has to come from Kingston. The large territory to be covered is part of the policing issue as well. The breadth of the county makes resource collaboration a challenge, which is reflected in inflated service fees. Both Mayor Higgins and Councilor Inglis suggested that Council look to the county level when preparing their next budget, as both were impressed with how effectively Frontenac County presented their budget earlier this month. Council “privy” to eco-tourism development Council decided during Tuesday's budget draft approval to go ahead with the purchase of four accessible privies to be located throughout the township. The locations weren't yet confirmed but the idea is to place them in high-traffic areas where there are currently no available washroom facilities. Corey Klatt explained, “Most of these places are at the boat launches...our scenic routes. They come from three hours, four hours away and they don't have a place to go to the washroom so they go at the boat launch and we're constantly picking up toilet paper...”Council also approved, on the budget draft, the purchase of a new tractor to be used for clearing snow and flooding the ice at the Plevna rink and clearing snow off the star-gazing pad. It could possibly also be used for other applications, such as dragging beaches. This will eliminate a current contract for rink maintenance. Councilor Inglis worried about losing his shirt Councilor Fred Perry made a suggestion to council that they look into purchasing jackets with the North Frontenac logo on them, to be worn when councilors are out representing the county at conferences, meetings, etc. He said “if you want to be professional you have to dress professional.” Councilor Inglis was not impressed. “I'm not in school anymore,” said Inglis. Councilor Bedard explained, “We're trying to sell our brand. We're trying to sell this municipality. What better way to do it? And it's cheap.” Mayor Higgins agreed that it was a good way to promote the township. It was decided that money would be pulled from a marketing reserve to cover the costs of seven jackets, or shirts, which will feature the North Frontenac logo/name.

Ride For Dad coming up at Snow Road Snowmobile Club

submitted by Snow Road Snowmobile Club The Telus Snowmobile Ride For Dad raises money for prostate cancer research and awareness. Prostate Cancer is the most common Cancer in Canadian men. One in seven Canadian men will develop prostate cancer during his lifetime. The event is national in scope but funds remain in the host community. You have an opportunity to participate in this first ever snowmobile Ride for Dad locally on February 28 at Snow Road Snowmobile Club, 1106 Gemmills Road. Registration or donations can be made online at RideForDad.ca or the day of the ride from 8am to 10 am. Donuts and coffee will be served at the SRSC Clubhouse. The planned trail ride covers approx 150km through the scenic trail network of the K & P Snowmobile Trails Association. Lunch will be provided at Civitan Club in Lanark. Prizes will be handed out at the close of the run at SRSC. Supper will be available following presentations. Trail ride begins at 10am; event cost is $30 (includes HST); free registration for riders collecting $100 or more in pledges. Therefore you are encouraged to get busy and line up your pledges.

North Frontenac Council – February 2

Mayor sees a long shadow from Ardoch Lake development “These are precedent-setting decisions,” said Mayor Ron Higgins regarding how the township should move forward on a development proposal for Ardoch Lake. The Malcolm/Ardoch Lake Association (MALA) has requested that council hire an independent planner to research the environmental impact of the 34-lot vacant land condominium development proposed for the lake. Ardoch lake Property Owners have already hired their own consultant, Gord Neilsen from Michalski Neilsen Ltd. Neilsen, in his report on the proposal, said that Ardoch Lake is a “high-quality water lake” and that although his opinion is that the lake “can withstand some additional shoreline development ... the scale of currently proposed development is of major concern.” Neilsen goes on to say that “changes in the water quality, recreational, aesthetic, fisheries and wildlife qualities of a lake, which can be brought about by excessive shoreline development, are generally irreversible” and that increasing the dwellings on the lake by approximately 400% must be approached with considerable caution. Mayor Higgins said that council needs to be “careful in how it navigates this proposal” as it will set the tone for how the township balances economic development with environmental concerns in the future. Councilor Gerry Martin suggested that if the township was to bring on a consultant for this purpose it would be a bad decision to hire Neilsen as it could show a bias that might possibly work against them if the matter eventually finds its way into the court system. There was some concern expressed about the cost of hiring a new consultant to prepare a similar study on the development and North Frontenac Planning Coordinator Jenny Duhamel said she is looking into the developer's responsibilities regarding covering the costs of such a research project. Council also plans to consult with Joe Gallivan, the manager of Sustainability Planning for Frontenac County.Mayor Higgins and Councilor Martin both said it is best if they step away from future discussions regarding the Ardoch Lake development due to a conflict of interest, as they both have residences on adjoining Malcolm Lake. Strategic plan moves forward Councilor John Inglis expressed a concern about the township's new strategic plan. In reference to the new plan Inglis said to Mayor Higgins, “I'm a little surprised by the process....a little nervous, [it seems] a little too centred on you”. Higgins, who comes from a consulting background, explained how the plan was drafted based on the previous strategic plans and goals. He said that his approach in his first year as mayor was to not take on too much at the county level so that he could focus on implementing this new strategic plan, and expressed his comfort with the associated workload. A motion to go to the public with the new plan was passed with only a slight amendment; the term “balanced score card” was changed to “progress report.” The township is preparing to roll out the new plan in a series of town hall meetings as well as press releases. War memorial well underway Councilor Martin updated council on the progress of the war memorial. The cement footings have been poured and the next steps are on hold until the frost is out of the ground. Martin mentioned the possibility of obtaining a piece of military field equipment to have on site permanently as well installing some benches. There was some discussion as to whether it was feasible to have local soldiers' names carved into the stone of the memorial but some councilors raised concern about the difficulty of accounting for everyone and felt that missing someone on the list would be problematic to the public. All councilors present were very impressed by the memorial progress. Martin also said that one of his goals as councilor is to have archives set up for North Frontenac. “We are losing our history,” Martin said, “I'm passionate about conserving the important past of the area.” He said there will be more news forthcoming.  A year-round future for Bon Echo? Officials from the Land O'Lakes Tourist Association, Lennox and Addington County, and Addington Highlands met with MPP Randy Hillier earlier this year to discuss the possibility of keeping Bon Echo Provincial Park open all year round. It currently closes in October and opens again in May. The plan is to have yurts - built with assistance from Algonquin College's construction program – available to rent as winter accommodations as well as snowshoe trails and other winter activities in the park. Yurts, circular, domed tents typically built on solid wooden bases, are easy to heat and ideal for this type of application. They are quite popular in other Ontario Parks that are open in winter, like Algonquin and Killarney. LOLTA reached out to North Frontenac council to see if they would be interested in having a representative from the township participate in the conversation. The council voted to have Councilor Fred Perry represent NF Township, with Councilor Gerry Martin as an alternate. Perry and Martin both have connections to the park.  

CENTRAL FRONTENAC NEWS

11th Annual Big Gull Derby-family fishing at its best

11th Annual Big Gull Derby-family fishing at its best

More than 400 tickets were sold at the Frontenac-Addington Trappers Council's annual fishing derby on February 28. The weather cooperated for this year’s event, which since its inception over a decade ago has been taking place on Big Gull Lake near Henderson. The derby is perhaps...

Sharbot Lake Farmers Market to grow

by Mary de Bassecourt, SLFM Market Manager Eager and enthusiastic farmers attended the Sharbot Lake Farmers Market farm vendor information session Wednesday evening, February 25, at the St. Lawrence College Employment Centre in Sharbot Lake. Current SLFM vendors Tom Waller of Elm Tree Farm, Janet Ducharme of Johnston Lake Organic’s Farm & Market, Pat Furlong of Elphin Gold Organics, and Peter de Bassecourt came out to field questions and chat with the participants, and maybe for the first time this winter we experienced the novel sensation of being too warm due to the number of people in the room! With new vendors coming on board for the 2015 market season, SLFM expects to be able to offer more produce and new products such as shitake and oyster mushrooms, living foods, microgreens, worms and castings, more grassfed beef, pastured pork, wild edibles, soaps with home-grown herbs, etc. Almost all of your favourite vendors from previous years will be returning. We hope to also add some new artisans to the mix. Many thanks to Lesley Picard of the St. Lawrence College Employment Centre in Sharbot Lake for letting us use their board room for the information session. The Sharbot Lake Farmers Market will open on Victoria Day Weekend, May 16, from 9 am – 1 pm. www.facebook.com/sharbotlakefarmersmarket

What's next at North Frontenac Little Theatre

by Pat Fisher It's a musical. It has a big cast - actors of all ages. It will be staged the first two weekends in May at Granite Ridge Education Centre. It's The Music Man. The Music Man was written by musician Meredith Wilson and his friend Franklin Lacey. It was rejected a few times before it was staged. They wrote 44 songs for the show but streamlined it to 18 of the best. From December 1957 to April 1961 it played on Broadway (1,375 shows) and was adapted for film in 1962, staring Robert Preston and again in 2003, staring Matthew Broderick. Theatre companies everywhere have performed The Music Man, including our own North Frontenac Little Theatre in 1981. A peek at the NFLT website will show you the programme and all those of our community who were involved in that production. People love the music and although the story is old-fashioned (a con man is at work in a small town but love prevails), it has a charm that warms our hearts. Much more about this show will be written in the months to come. Mark your calendars for May performances. Get ready to enjoy an energetic show and the tune "Seventy Six Trombones". Visit www.nflt.ca

Polar Bear Plunge- better late than never

For those adverse to the idea of plunging into an icy Sharbot Lake in February, reversing the old adage of “better late than never” to “better never than late” might fit the bill more. But that was not the case for the 32 Polar Bear plungers who leapt from the docks of the Sharbot Lake Marina on February 22 into the frigid waters below at the Frontenac Heritage Festival's fifth annual Polar Bear Plunge. The Plunge was originally scheduled for February 15 but had to be rescheduled due to bitterly cold weather that day. Paddy O'Connor and Janet Gutowski emceed the event and announced the winners in a number of categories. Head Polar Bear Mark Montagano, who heads up the Plunge, raised the most funds ($1300) and Liberal party candidate for Lanark-Frontenac-Kingston, Philippe Archambault and his wife Melanie, who were dressed to the nines in the Liberal party colours, together raised $1020. Art Holloway raised $870 and by the end of the day a total of $8,000 was raised. The proceeds from the event will fund numerous local causes, which include programs at the Child Care Centre, the school council at Granite Ridge and the Alzheimer's Society. This year’s Plunge brings the total raised by the event over five years to close to $40,000. Other plungers recognized this year included hula dancer Linda Harding-DeVries, who won for best costume. The youngest plunger was 11-year-old Osten Gibson who joined his dad Darren, and the oldest plunger was Karen Burke. The event continues to attract more and more plungers every year and Mark Montagano made mention of the many key players whose efforts allow the event to take place. They include Bill Young and his team of fire fighters and paramedics; Richard, Gill and Dawn of the Sharbot Lake Marina; staff of Central Frontenac Township; Cox Bus Lines and of course the many brave plungers and their enthusiastic supporters.

Hydro One donates $10,000 for play equipment at Parham ball field.

Jon Roberts from Hydro One's Kingston office presented $10,000 to the Hinchinbrooke District Recreation Committee and Central Frontenac Mayor Frances Smith on Tuesday. The money comes from the Hydro One Power Play granting program, and will help pay for a play structure in Parham. “We operate equipment in almost every town in Ontario,” said Roberts, "and all of our employees ... are committed to making Hydro One a good corporate citizen. Hydro One invests in our communities to build and maintain safe, healthy places for healthy, active lifestyles.” Power Play is a granting program that was established by Hydro One in 2008 to support and enhance sports and recreation facilities in Ontario. The Hinchinbrooke Recreation Committee has raised $10,000 on their own towards the project, and there is $15,000 in the draft 2015 township budget as well. With the additional $10,000 from the Power Play grant, the committee is now planning to purchase a $33,000 play structure and spend a further $2,000 on either wood chips or sand to go under the new structure. The township public works department as well as Rec. Committee volunteers will be doing site preparation in the spring as soon as the ground is ready to be worked. The entire project has been costed out at $35,000 in cash, plus up to $15,000 in volunteer and township labour. “On behalf of the Township of Central Frontenac, I want to congratulate the Hinchinbrooke Recreation Committee for all their hard work and many hours of fundraising in order to provide new playground equipment to be placed at the ball field in Parham,” said Mayor Frances Smith. Caption – (L to R) Jon Roberts from Hydro One; Mayor Frances Smith; Bob Teal of the Hinchinbrooke Rec. Committee; and Barrie Stanbury from Hydro One posing with a ceremonial $10,000 Power Play Cheque at the Central Frontenac Township office on February 24.

SOUTH FRONTENAC NEWS

Slow cooking at Prince Charles P.S.

Slow cooking at Prince Charles P.S.

In an effort to teach practical life skills to students in the Limestone District School Board (LDSB), a new pilot project called Slow Cookers for Kids was launched at three Kingston area schools, and last week the three-day program was introduced to grade 7 and 8 students at Pri...

Three Verona artists at the Grace Centre

In their ongoing efforts to showcase the work of local artists, the Grace Centre Arts Committee held a special artists talk and reception at the Grace Centre in Sydenham on March 1. Three artists, Elaine Farragher, Jill Harris, and Virginia Lavin, whose works will be on display at the centre until March 26, each spoke on what inspires their work. The paintings that make up this expansive show are mostly landscapes and all three women spoke of being inspired by the bounty and beauty of the local nature where they live. Farragher, who spoke first, said she has always “gone in for realism” and paints nature in all its glory and minutia. Farragher said she has always resisted the trend to paint more abstractly and her works are highly detailed and demonstrate her determination to paint the natural world that surrounds her. Jill Harris is also inspired by Canadian land and sky and her far-flung travels throughout the country have captured various intimate and expansive landscapes including those from the far north, British Columbia's west coast as well as a number of intimate rural scenes in and around Verona and Harrowsmith. Her pictures are subtle and her virtuoso talent with colour creates paintings that are rich, diverse and sublime. Virginia Lavin spoke of the calming and therapeutic effects that painting offers her. She switched from watercolour to acrylics, opting for the latter for their “versatility and forgiveness”. Much of her subject matter is what she sees from her own back yard in Bellrock. Her swan series is especially pleasing. Her downy swans are lush and intricate and are masterfully and realistically depicted on bright and vibrant rice papered abstract backgrounds. For those who missed the opening talk and reception, the show can be viewed at the Grace Centre during regular business hours by calling the SFCSC at 613-376-6477. To arrange for a weekend viewing email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

South Frontenac Council

Loughborough Lake Association raises lake capacity issue in Johnston Point development by Wilma Kenny and Jeff Green The Johnston Point Plan of Condominum on the east basin of Loughborough Lake is in the late stages of approval and seems to be favoured by South Frontenac Council and the township's planning department. However it remains a controversial development for some of the neighbouring property owners and has drawn the attention of the Battersea Loughborough Lake Association as well. At a public open house on Tuesday night, a number of people spoke. Mat Rennie pointed out that some of the covenants meant to protect the shoreline along the nearby Applewood development had already been violated, with trees cut and not replaced as requested by the township. Helen Bartsch questioned the calculation of frontage, saying that the Ministry of Natural Resources (MNR) assured her that a wetland edge should not count as a high water line. Roel Vertegaal quoted a Queen’s biologist as saying that Loughborough Lake was part of the UN designated Biosphere reserve because the area was considered to be “the most biodiverse area in Ontario, unique in the world”. Jeff Peters quoted the township’s Official Plan’s intent to “preserve and enhance the rural environment”, saying he couldn’t remember when a decision was made which would either preserve or enhance rural character. M. Koen asked “How much development (on this lake) is appropriate? What’s the lake’s capacity? Is this development compatible with existing and proposed development on Loughborough Lake?’ Developer Mike Keene spoke briefly at the end, saying that all the above concerns had already been addressed in writing, and he would be happy to address any that are left. In addition to the presentations, the township received a letter submitted by Association Vice President Brian Ward and Secretary Sherry Cornell on behalf of its board of directors. The association raises a number of issues that are similar to the ones presented at the open house. In addition, the association raised the issue about lake capacity in some detail, pointing out that the new 14-lot development, in conjunction with a 3-lot severance and a recent 22-lot development by the same developer across the bay will increase the total number of lots on the east basin by 39, a 12% increase in short order to a basin that now has 317 lots on it. “The township does not have a plan for the lake and thus must react to proposals after the developers have invested considerable time and effort. We are hoping to encourage the township to move from this reactive approach to a planned, forward thinking approach. The association would be prepared to work with the township and other agencies in this regard,” says the letter. The letter also talks about breaches to the rules about vegetative buffers around lakes, which are crucial in the effort to prevent phosphate loading in the lakes. “There are too many examples of the no tree cutting requirements not being followed on Loughborough Lake and other nearby lakes. The examples include other developments by the applicant for Johnston Point.” The letter asks that these rules be communicated to all buyers in advance, but realises little can be done, even if property owners are fined once they have cleared buffers and done “irreparable damage to the lake”. At next week’s Committee of the Whole meeting, (March 12) Council will have the opportunity to discuss the proposal again, and at that time they may also review and revise the draft conditions of approval. South Frontenac politicians’ remuneration for 2014. By Jeff Green As a group, municipal politicians in South Frontenac were paid over $175,000 in 2014. The payments included a standard amount as an honorarium paid to each council member once a month (the mayor and deputy mayor receive a higher amount), as well as payments for attending extra meetings. Meetings of council sub-committees and the Committee of the Whole are considered extra meetings. As well, payments are made for mileage when councilors need to drive out of the township on township business, and per diems are paid when councilors attend conferences. Former mayor, Gary Davison, received $29,208 for the first 11 months of 2014 (the new council took over on December 1). That includes $19,810 as an honorarium, and just under $10,000 for meetings, mileage, etc. The current mayor, Ron Vandewal, received $23,274 for 11 months as deputy mayor and one month as mayor. Other payments included $21,040 to Pat Barr; $17,989 to John McDougall; $17,858 to Bill Robinson; $17,773 to Alan McPhail; $15,492 to Del Stowe; and $12,651 to Cam Naish. Newly elected members of council who received payment only for December included: Mark Schjerning, Alan Revill, Norm Roberts and Ron Sleeth, who each received a little over $1,300. These figures do not include the remuneration received by Gary Davison, John McDougall and Ron Vandewal for serving as members of Frontenac County Council. Those payments come out of the county budget. Coincidentally, the total paid to South Frontenac volunteer firefighters in 2014 was also released this week. All told, the firefighters received $300,883 in pay in 2014. This is based on $30 per call and $10.38 for every hour after a three hour minimum, as well as pay for training sessions. Pleasant Valley Road Quarry Expansion Planner Mills reported that both the Ministry of Municipal Affairs and the Ministry of Natural resources had expressed no objections to the Official Plan amendment that would allow the quarry owner (Jackson’s Earth Stones) to apply for a quarry license to expand its area. “The actual scale of operation is not expected to increase.” Mills said the quarry owner had agreed to amend the encroachment area from 300 metres to 150 metres, in response to a neighbour’s wish to keep open the option of severing lots from his property. Several Councillors spoke in support, saying the quarry owner had proven to be a respectful, good neighbour. Mills said the amendment would stand, even if the quarry property should change ownership in the future. Contract for By-law Enforcement Services Council awarded a 3-year contract to the current by-law enforcement officer, Ken Gilpin, with an option to renew for an additional two years. There had been no other responses to the RFP. Honorariums Adjusted The firefighters’ honorarium for calls and training was raised from $30 to $35, and the South Frontenac Recreation Committee members’ honorarium was increased from $25 to $30. Public Works Report Township Returns to Original Hazardous Waste Management Company Council accepted Mark Segsworth’s recommendation that the Township re-engage Brendar Environmental Ltd to manage the hazardous waste site, for although their bid was not the lowest, they had provided much better customer service that the current company, Drain-all. Mayor Vandewal added that Brendar did not require as much assistance from Township staff. Portland Waste Site Council approved Segsworth’s recommendation to extend Morven Construction’s contract for phase two of the partial capping of the Portland waste disposal site. Marvin has agreed to maintain last year’s tender price to complete the work. Segsworth said the waste site is already much improved by the capping that has been done. Councillor Sutherland suggested that the Portland site might be a good location for solar pa els, which could help recover some operating costs. Segsworth agreed to look into this possibility. Yarker Road Upgrade Comes in above Budget In order to complete the work on Yarker Road this year, Segsworth recommended postponing the replacement of the Salmon Lake Road culvert until Sept 2016, thus transferring $400,000 to the Yarker Road project. Otter Lake Meeting Segsworth recommended a public meeting with the “fairly knowledgeable North and South Otter Lake Association” some time this spring, perhaps in May, to discuss replacing the culverts at the end of North Otter Lake, and between North and South Otter, both of which are part of a navigable waterway. Bellrock Community Meeting There will be a community meeting in Bellrock Hall Thursday March 5, at 7:00, re the village revitalization planning.  

Sing 'N Strings leaves concert goers smiling

By Jonathan Davies Around 70 people turned out to the Kingston Christian Fellowship Church on February 20 for an evening of songs and the stories - both poignant bits of history and humourous trivia - behind them. With 18 singers from Verona and Harrowsmith United Churches and 40 string musicians with Kingston Community Strings in addition to the audience, the event made for a cozy refuge on a cold evening. Repertoire included a range of styles, from lively string instrumentals by contemporary English composer John Rutter, to sombre medieval French sacred music, to African-American spirituals, some rousing, others wistful. Wayne Tindale, musical director for Kingston Community Strings and conductor for Friday's concert noted that while his ensemble has done joint concerts before with other choirs, it can be a challenge achieving a balance between choir and orchestra, especially when singers are outnumbered by their instrument-playing counterparts. Another issue with bringing these particular groups together was finding time to rehearse together prior to the event, given the distance of their respective rehearsal venues. A dress rehearsal Thursday and pre-concert run-through gave them an opportunity to iron out rough spots and helped mesh the efforts of weeks of separate practices. The results were well received. As choir director Annabelle Twiddy noted, “everyone in the audience was very animated and lots of people had big smiles on their faces,” as the concert finished with “Bridge over Troubled Water,” which showcased the orchestra and choir, with Twiddy on Piano. Choir member Deborah Spaar-Mueller presented the song, offering a bit of lesser-known trivia (the line in verse three “Sail on silver girl” was inspired by Paul Simon's then wife Peggy Harper's first grey hairs.) A mid-concert highlight was a mellow, soulful rendition of “Swing Low, Sweet Chariot,” which, along with spirituals like “Goin' Home” and “Amen,” served to commemorate Black History Month . Gail Robertson presented the piece, describing the symbolism of the lyrics. The line “swing low, sweet chariot” is said to be a reference to the underground railroad swinging low to the south, “coming for to carry me home,” with home being the refuge that Canada promised Black slaves. It remains to be seen whether another joint concert between the two groups will come together, but both Twiddy and Tindale hope one does. In the meantime, the Trinity-St.Paul's choir is gearing up for another collaboration with several local church choirs for Easter performances of John Stainer's “The Crucifixion,” while Kingston Community Strings will be performing with Orchestra Kingston on May 8 at the Isabel Bader Centre for Performing Arts at Queen's University.

Painter Scott White – from Newfoundland to Westport

Scott White, a transplanted painter and carpenter originally from Newfoundland and now residing with his family near Westport, said that if it were up to him, he'd be painting full time. White, who is primarily a self-taught artist, has been painting for over 20 years. He said he fell in love with painting back in high school. A number of his canvases were on display at the Glendower hall near Godfrey on February 21 as part of the historical society’s open house there. White's preferred medium is oil and his subject matter is diverse. He is particularly drawn to historical buildings and landscapes, both local and some in Newfoundland, as well as antique and vintage cars. His works, especially his landscapes, seem to capture the drama of his eastern Canadian birth place. His Newfoundland landscape titled “Norris Point” is a particularly enticing canvas with deep and bright hues that make the expansive white house perched on the rocky shore seem to glow from within. White also paints local landscapes and he said he was fascinated and inspired by the buildings and geography at Bedford Mills, which is the subject of another painting where he captures the historic architectural charm of one older building located there. Old vintage cars are often front and center in White’s canvases and in one painting he depicts a red 1934 Ford emergency vehicle. “I love painting older vintage cars since they have certain characteristics that you don't often get to see and I chose to paint them partly as a way to preserve their uniqueness.” White paints at his home and has set up a studio in his garage where he works in the warmer months. He moves the studio into his home in the winter time. Asked if his carpentry in any way informs his art work, White said that while carpentry can sometimes be a creative outlet, especially when designing certain prescribed spaces, painting offers him a totally different kind of freedom. “When you are painting you don't have to follow any rules at all. The options are endless and the challenge is that you can turn a blank canvas into anything you like.” He said that he will often paint from photos especially when depicting an actual place but he also takes creative license to make his paintings more interesting and dramatic. As an example, in one landscape he added a snowy owl perched on a fence post, which he said was not actually there. In some cases he will first create a number of sketches and then paint from those. White's work is currently hanging at the TAG Art Gallery in St. Catharines and his paintings can also be viewed at the Sharbot Lake Country Inn. He is planning to apply to a number of summer art shows this year including the Toronto Outdoor Art Exhibit. Anyone wishing to view Scott White's work can visit www.2-scott-white.artistwebsites.com or visit him on Facebook at ScottWhiteFineArt. Appointments can be made to visit his studio by emailing him at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

FRONTENAC COUNTY NEWS

Frontenac County to provide free planning for townships

Frontenac County to provide free planning for townships

Politicians from South Frontenac had been waiting for a year to find out if their ratepayers would be subsiding planning services for residents of the three other townships in Frontenac County. At a Committee of the Whole meeting of Frontenac County Council last week (February 1...

County budget settled: Levy to go up by 3.5%

Three days were set aside last week for Frontenac County Council to hammer away at the 2015 budget. In the end it took only two days for the council to accept not only the base budget proposed by County staff, but the extra projects that were proposed as well. Staff had targeted a 2.8% increase in the amount that ratepayers will be charged for county services this year, based on the annualized consumer price index (CPI) that came out last October. The CPI is a standard that is commonly used in municipal budgeting, as that is when budgets start being put together. They added a 0.65% capital levy in order to put money aside for asset management to cover for long-term replacement costs. This resulted in the 3.45% target, and in his summation of budget, Chief Administrative Officer Kelly Pender said that the budget numbers reflected what is needed to maintain service levels. “Our job is to bring you a budget that reflects the service delivery that exists,” he said. He also described a long-term budgeting process that has been instituted, whereby increases will be predictably tied to the CPI with a 0.65% capital replacement cost added on, yielding a predictable 10-year projection of tax rates. “Surprises aren't good in the budgeting world,” he said, in describing his approach. Treasurer Marian Vanbruinessen presented the budget detail, contradicting Pender's assertion with irony; “I thought this was the most exciting part of everyone’s life,” she said. Most of the debate at the two budget meetings last week centered on the nine project proposals that were included in the overall budget numbers that were presented, but which are outside the required functions of the county. They could have been set aside if council did not want to proceed with them. The projects ranged in scope from $8,500 for a consultant to review the pay rates for members of council, to $270,000 to extend the K&P Trail to the north, with a view towards having it completed, from Orser Road at the border with Kingston, to meet the Trans-Canada Trail in Sharbot Lake by the end of 2016. Other projects include: a $60,000 study of the cost impact of development on private lanes; $77,000 for Community Improvement Plans; $40,000 to purchase a 4x4 vehicle for use by the planning, economic development and GIS departments and for special County events; and $735,000 for the purchase of Power Lift stretchers for the Frontenac Paramedic Services. Few of the costs associated with these projects will be taken from the 2015 levy to ratepayers. For example, all of the trail development costs come from federal gas tax rebates the county received in the past (all current and future gas tax rebates are transferred to the local townships for use on road and bridge projects). The Power Lift stretcher project will be 80% funded by the City of Kingston, which is served by Frontenac Paramedic Services, reducing its impact on the county levy. In the end, none of the nine proposals were rejected. The budget will come forward for formal approval at the regular February meeting of Council, which takes place next Wednesday, February 18. Barring any last minute amendments, the increase will be 3.45%. The county levy is included as part of the tax bill that is sent out by each of the townships. Local taxes, which are set by each township, as well as education taxes, are all combined to make up the municipal tax bill.

“Sing 'N Strings” concert coming up February 20

Two talented musical groups will be joining forces for the first time at a special one time concert that will take place Friday, February 20 at the Kingston Christian Fellowship Church. The concert will feature performances by the 19-member Trinity United Church choir of Verona/Harrowsmith under the direction of Annabelle Twiddy and the 40-member Kingston Community String Orchestra under the direction of Wayne Tindale. The concert is the brain child of Rennie Hutzler, a member of the orchestra who has been a long-time loyal fan of the Trinity choir. Last summer Hutzler initiated a meeting between the groups' two conductors, who decided to put on the one-time concert. Sing 'N Strings begins at 7:30pm and will offer up a 1 hour, 10 minute repertoire that will include offerings by both groups individually as well as a number of combined offerings, which will include the ancient chant of eucharistic devotion, “Let All Mortal Flesh Keep Silence” and a moving and melodic spiritual set to the tune of Dvorak's New World Symphony. The finale will definitely be a show stopper and I will not give away here; suffice to say that is sure to be especially moving and memorable. I will only hint that it is a favorite pop classic that listeners will remember from decades ago and that should leave them with a warming of their hearts and souls on what will likely be another cold February day. Live music remains one of the more humane, friendly and universal mediums, and though it has been noted that listening to accomplished musicians will not make one's wallet bigger nor slake one's thirst or hunger, still, it has the ability to leave one with a sense of wonder and enchantment, and the feelings of hope and comfort that only accomplished singers and players coming together can bring. The concert is free of charge and listeners are invited to make a free will offering at the door. The Kingston Christian Fellowship church is located at 2621 Road 38 just south of Harrowsmith. The church is 100% wheelchair accessible and there is plenty of parking available.  

Delays in assessment harm patients, says striking union

The strike by 230 care co-ordinators who work for the Southeast Community Care Access Centre (CCAC), which covers Kingston, Frontenac, Lennox and Addington, Leeds Grenville, Lanark and Hastings Counties, is already having an impact on patient care, says Lisa Turner, the president of the Ontario Nurses’ Association branch that represents the workers. The strike began last Friday, Feb. 6, at the same time as similar workers in nine of the 10 regional CCACs in Ontario rejected offers from management. According to Turner, workers are seeking a 1.4% increase each year, but management is offering a lump sum payment in lieu of an increase in year one, and 1.4% in year two. “Our demands are very reasonable; they are less than other bargaining units, and by offering a lump sum payment they are not moving the pay grid forward, which is not acceptable. We have had our wages frozen for two years before this,” said Turner, who also said that no further negotiations have been initiated by management since the strike began. Turner said that claims by the CCAC that management personnel are able to handle intake and changes in care plans are not believable. “They do not have the staff available,” she said, when contacted at a mass rally of striking workers, which was held at Kingston General Hospital on Tuesday (February 10). Striking workers include registered nurses, nurse practitioners, physiotherapists, occupational therapists and social workers. Services offered by the CCAC are designed to help people stay in the home longer or leave hospital sooner. Ongoing CCAC service is not affected by the strike; it is only those seeking new service or a change in the service that is offered by the CCAC that are affected. According to Gary Buffett of the Communications office of the Southeast CCAC, about 20 management personnel, who are trained health care professionals, are handling the work load during the strike. “I would not say it is business as usual,” said Buffett, “but we are keeping our head above water.” The focus for the CCAC has been to deal with people leaving hospital and needing service after their release. Home visits by care co-ordinators, such as those provided by the co-ordinator normally based in Northbrook, are not taking place except in rare cases, Buffett said. “We are doing assessments over the phone right now in most cases and extending service that way,” he said. “Nobody is working out of KGH, where 20 people are normally based,” said Lisa Turner., “there is no way they can keep up with the volume. There is a whole swath of people that are not getting access to care. We need to get the word out there that the most vulnerable patients are losing access to care.” The negotiations between the CCAC and nine out of 10 Ontario Nursing Association bargaining units are being handled out of Toronto even though each CCAC has a contract with their own workers. The issue separating the parties is money, and it is unclear how far apart the two parties actually are in terms of money. Both sides also claim that they are willing to re-enter negotiations and the other is refusing. What is clear, at least from the statements by both Lisa Turner and CCAC spokesperson Gary Buffett, is that both sides recognise the strike is stressing the system. According to Gary Buffett, the stress to the system is not compromising patient care. “We are providing the referrals and we will clean up the mess later,” he said. Lisa Turner, however, said that patient care is already being impacted.

Frontenac County Council

Absenteeism at Fairmount Home concerns new council Throughout the 2011-2014 term of council, former Frontenac County councilor, David Jones (Frontenac Islands), spoke at length and with considerable vitriol about the absenteeism rate at Frontenac Paramedic Services. Now that Jones is gone, North Frontenac Mayor Ron Higgins seems to have taken up the torch, in a less aggressive way. In response to the year-end absenteeism report for 2014, which was presented to Council at their January 21 meeting, Higgins said “When I see this report it appears there is a problem at Fairmount Home, but without some information about the size of the workforce, the percentage of absenteeism to overall hours, and possibly something to compare the rate at Fairmount to other similar-sized facilities, I really don't know what it means,” he said. The report showed that the total hours lost to absenteeism at Fairmount reached a three-year high in 2014. 14,800 hours were lost in 2012; however, the number dropped to 11,519 in 2013, and then jumped to 16,040 in 2014. By contrast, Frontenac Paramedic Services hit a three-year low in 2014, losing 18,923 hours as compared to 21,913 in 2013 and 19,653 in 2012. The other category of worker covered in the report, those who work in corporate services at the county office, saw a return to historic levels after a spike in 2013. In 2014, 399 hours were lost to illness, as compared to 977 in 2013, and 481 in 2012. Frontenac County ratepayers pay a small portion of the operating costs of both Fairmount Home and Frontenac Paramedic Services, which receive significant finding from the Province of Ontario and the City of Kingston. County ratepayers pick up the entire cost of Corporate Services, however. County Chief Administrative Officer Kelly Pender said that staff are working on an improved absenteeism report. “We recognize that the report does not give council members the kind of useful comparative information to help them provide proper oversight,” he said. The other missing piece of information, according to Ron Higgins, “is any sort of root cause analysis of why people are calling in sick in these numbers.” Community Paramedicine Initiative: A pilot project to come up with a viable community paramedicine initiative for Kingston and Frontenac County, which received $158,000 in provincial funding, has seen half of the money spent on a study to be completed by a Queen's professor. The $81,000 project includes research into existing paramedicine projects based on a detailed literature scan, a list of potential partners in the project. The contract will be completed by the inclusion of a “demonstration program logic model to guide implantation and evaluation of a demonstration home visit/wellness program aimed at addressing the needs of the community, and to support healthy aging in the home across the geographical area of the County of Frontenac and the City of Kingston,” to use the wording of the Queen's University proposal. Councilor John McDougall was underwhelmed by the proposal. “My difficulty with this is that we are going to get high level information back when the goal is to establish a solid framework for future core paramedic programs and a communication plan .... this looks like a lot of things we could already pull up from what has been done before,” he said. Gale Chevalier, the Deputy Chief of Frontenac Paramedic Services who is leading the entire paramedicine initiative, agreed with McDougall, in part. “You are correct, we went out with an RFP [Request For Proposal] to see if we could get all of the work done to get a program up and running, and no one responded to it. But one thing we do need done in any case is the research part, which is something we do not have the internal expertise to do, so this covers that part off. I agree this project from Queen's is not developing the communications link,” she said. “They are going to do a literature review and provide information but the onus is still on you to move this forward beyond that,” said Councilor Natalie Nozzal (Frontenac Islands) to Chevalier. “Communications is a large part of this. There will need to be budget money for that because Queen's will not deliver it,” said Ron Higgins. “I still think that the part that Queen's is going to provide has already been done.” said McDougall. Despite the stated reservations, Council approved a motion to enter into the $81,000 contract with Queen's. Councilor McDougall voted against the motion.

ADDINGTON HIGHLANDS NEWS

Addington Highlands Council

Addington Highlands Council

300 megawatt wind power project proposed for Addington Highlands/North Frontenac It seems that every three or four years a proponent for a wind project shows up at Addington Highlands Council to talk about the potential of the north eastern edge of the township (the Vennachar-De...

A brief history of the Sedore family in Flinton

At their monthly meeting at Cloyne's Barrie hall on February 16, Shirley Sedore presented a talk on the roots of the Sedore family in the Flinton. Shirley' s husband, Ronald Sedore who passed away in 2002, hailed from a family whose roots go back multiple generations in Flinton. Shirley began with the founder of Ronald's family, one Coonradt Sedore who was born in Germany in 1734. It is believed that Coonradt arrived in the United States sometime either in 1754 or 1755 and documents show that he enlisted in the New York militia in 1758. Other records dating from 1755 from the Old Dutch church of Sleepy Hollow, (now known as the First Reform Church of Tarrytown, New York), show that Coonradt Sedore married Antje Boeckhout, the latter, a native of Philipsburgh, N.Y. who was baptized in Tarrytown, N.Y. in 1733. Both Coonradt and Antje are thought to have lived until about 1810. In her presentation Shirley noted that there exist various spellings of both names, Coonradt and Sedore but that the family founder used the original spellings (used here) until the end of his life. The 1758 enlistment records show that Coonradt's occupation had been as a “taylor” and it is believed that he likely learned the tailoring trade prior to leaving Europe. The couple had eight children, 6 boys and 2 girls, all born in New York State. It is believed that the family moved to Canada sometime in the early 1800's. One of their sons, John, who was born in 1784, married Margaret Thompson in Richmond Township in 1807. One of that couple’s sons named Issac lll moved from Richmond township to Kaladar, Ontario and married Hannah Yorke in Lennox and Addington. Shirley noted that Issac lll died at the age of 91 in Kaladar Township and Hannah died there also at the age of 80. Isaac lll and Hannah's youngest son, Jonas, was born July 10, 1839 and he was the great, grand father of the present days Sedores. He was Ronald (Shirley’s husband) Sedore’s great grandfather. Jonas married Jane Clark in 1862 and they had 11 children. Their son Herbert married Isabel Robinson and together they had 8 children. Joseph was that couple’s eldest son born in 1903, one of 3 boys and 5 sisters and Joseph was Shirley's father-in-law and her husband Ronald's father. Shirley herself grew up in Mountain Grove and met Ronald Sedore in 1953. She noted that at that time only one brother and two sisters of her father-in-law Joseph were still living. Shirley and Ronald had seven children of their own, six of whom are living. Researching a family history never comes easy or without its own special mysteries. One that Shirley uncovered was the question of one Abraham Sedore, who is definitely a relative though it is yet to be determined exactly how he is related. Whatever the case, it is known that Abraham Sedore was nicknamed “Bromie” and it is thought that he had no less than 31 children with three different wives. It is amazing that some people are able to trace their family ancestors back so many generations and it was generous of Shirley Sedore to share what she has found with members of the Cloyne and District Historical Society and guests.

Friends of Bon Echo Bursaries

by Derek Maggs The Friends of Bon Echo Park are pleased to announce the presentation of two $500 bursaries to Jared Salmond of Flinton and Abby Follett of Omemee, Ontario. The Friends of Bon Echo Provincial Park have been providing bursaries to deserving students of the North Addington Education Centre and summer employment students at the Park. Eligible candidates must be engaged in a post- secondary program that resonates with the goals of the Friends. In recent years the bursaries have been donated by the McLaren family in memory of Doris and Keith McLaren, long time volunteers with the Friends. Jared Salmond graduated recently from the North Addington Education Centre in Cloyne and is currently studying Engineering at Queen's University.  Jared's knowledge and commitment to Bon Echo Provincial Park began many years ago.  From the time he was a young child, Jared has spent many weeks every summer camping with his family. As soon as he was old enough, Jared was involved with the Mazinaw Lake Swim Program, first as a student, then as a volunteer, an instructor and as the Program Supervisor.  For the last three years, Jared has worked at Bon Echo--initially as the Wood Lot Attendant and most recently as a Gate Attendant.  For Jared, summer has meant Bon Echo.  He understands the importance of community and volunteerism and has spent countless hours working with community children in a variety of activities. Although pursuing further education has taken Jared out of his community, his hope is to return and continue this contribution in new ways.  Whatever the future brings for Jared, one thing is certain. The roots he has in Bon Echo have enriched and encouraged his genuine interest in people and the environment.    Abby Follett is in the Environmental Science/Studies program at Trent University, currently completing her third year. Her courses are focused on environmental law and species-at-risk with the hope of going into one of these fields once she completes her degree. This past summer was her first at Bon Echo. She served as a Natural Heritage Educator and found the experience amazing and very fulfilling. She hopes to return this summer. Abby was fortunate enough to spend the majority of her childhood summers traveling across Canada with her family on camping trips. She loved being outside, taking part in programs and activities where she could help the environment. She was a junior member of the horticulture society, and helped plan Earth Day clean up programs in her neighbourhood. In high school, she was part of the Green Team and initiated recycling programs. Abby is committed to do her part to enhance awareness and to motivate others in efforts to serve the  

High Land Waters Métis Council meets in Northbrook

The High Land Water Métis Council held an information and nomination meeting on January 31 at the Northbrook Lions hall, which was attended by close to 30 people. The meeting’s dual purpose was to attract new members and to nominate representatives for positions on the council. The High Land Waters Métis Council, which has been in existence for just seven years, is one of Ontario’s 29 Métis community councils. Its members represent part of region six, one section of the Métis Nation of Ontario (MNO) that stretches east to Perth, west to Peterborough, south to Kingston and north to Bancroft. The 29 councils together make up the Métis Nation of Ontario, which is the organization officially recognized by the provincial and federal governments, and which through the Provisional Council of Métis of Ontario (PCMO) works with the Ontario government to discuss current issues and to implement their objectives. Representatives on the council strive to bring Métis awareness to their communities and to let members know what services are available to them. Currently there are 500 card-holding members of the MNO in region 6. Present at the meeting were Amanda Cox and Tracey Dale, both staff from the MNO's Bancroft office, and respectively, from its employment and health branches. Each spoke about the various services that are offered to members of the MNO but that are also made available to anyone in need. These services cover a wide range of health, employment and training programs through the MNO. Also present at the meeting was Hank Rowlinson, manager of Community Relations with the MNO, who gave an overview of current issues facing the MNO at the provincial and national levels. Rowlinson also stressed the importance of community involvement. “This community has been working hard for the last seven years to create their own charter and what we are trying to do now is help them to sustain that charter. The best way to do that is to get more people involved,” he said. “Having a community here that is visible and practicing their culture is the best way to spread community pride.” Rowlinson said that one of the major issues currently facing the Métis involves an upcoming 2015 hearing at the Supreme Court of Canda concerning the Daniels vs Canada case. The MNO will be seeking intervener status during the hearings in that case in the hopes of upholding a decision made previously by the Federal Court of Canada, which asserted that the Métis are the responsibility of the federal government and should be defined as “Indians” under the Canadian Constitution, thereby receiving the same rights and benefits. Deirdre Thompson, current president of the High Land Waters Council, who lives in Northbrook, said that she hopes to see membership numbers increase as a direct result of the recent meeting in Northbrook. She said that for a long time Métis people struggled with an identity that considered them “too white to be native and too native to be white.” “We are trying to let people know that we exist and that we have rights as Aboriginal people.” Thompson said that the long-term goal of council is to spread awareness that the Métis are a distinct Aboriginal group. “We want to have the same recognition as other native peoples.” Included on the Métis Nation of Ontario’s website is an in depth history of the Métis in Canada, outlining their origins, which began in the late 17th and early 18th century with the establishment of the fur trade in this country. This unique group of people formed when male European settlers and Aboriginal women began forming relationships and having children. Soon after, these populations and communities began to self-identify as their own distinct communities. The MNO website highlights the struggles the Métis went through and which continue as they try to protect their lands. It explains how they began to formally mobilize and in 1869 how the Métis National Committee was formed. Louis Riel, best known for leading the Northwest Rebellion in the mid-1880s, for which he was tried and hung, is a celebrated hero for the Métis people and his history is well documented on the site. Also highlighted are the current accomplishments and victories that the Métis people have made, many in the courts and many in the last 30 years and that include their inclusion in the charter as one of the three distinct Aboriginal peoples of Canada. The formal nominations for the new council for 2015 wrapped up Saturday’s meeting in Northbrook. Secretary/treasurer Candace Lloyd, and youth representative Gwendalyn Lloyd were acclaimed. The councilors nominated and elected by acclamation were Terry Conners, Gertrude Conners and Thomas W. Thompson. Nominated for president were Scott Lloyd and Catherine Thompson and nominated for the position of chair were Marlon Lloyd and Benjamin Saulnier. The position for women’s representative is still open. The elections will take place at the Northbrook Lions hall on Sunday, March 8 from 9am-5pm. Voters must have their Métis Nation of Ontario citizenship card in order to cast a ballot. photo- 2046  

MLFI-Managing Crown forests in Mazinaw and Lanark

Crowded into a tiny office tacked onto the north end of the Barrie hall in Cloyne are the small offices of the six staff members who make up Mazinaw-Lanark Forest Inc. (MLFI), a private company that works year round managing the Crown land forest in Lanark and Mazinaw. The land they manage covers a huge swath totaling 305,000 hectares in an area that stretches west to Marmora, east to Carleton Place, north to the Madawaska River and south to Tamworth. The company, which started up in 1998, is owned and funded by local shareholders including 13 independent logging companies, seven sawmills and one pulp mill. The company operates under a sustainable forest license and its primary role is to prepare forest management plans, site-specific prescriptions and annual work schedules, while simultaneously meeting forest renewal obligations, plus all government reporting requirements, and ensuring that all operations comply with the Crown Forest Sustainability Act. The act aims to “manage Crown forests to meet the social, economic and environmental needs of future and present generations”. Prior to the late 1990s the management of Crown land forests was performed by the Ministry of Natural Resources (MNR), after which time and under the Harris government that management was transferred to the private sector. The MNR still retains the overall responsibility of making sure companies operating in the Crown forests comply with current legislation, which the MNR achieves by requiring management companies (like MLFI) to provide them with regular audits, inspections and reviews. They also are required to seek MNR approval for forest management plans. Because these local forests have for generations been logged by small family businesses, it was deemed in their best interest to hire a small team of professionals to carry out the management side of their businesses. Trying to manage the boots on the ground and the blades to the bark is enough to keep these small companies busy year round, so the shareholders hired MLFI to do the management side of their business. A big part of that management deals with in-depth immediate, short and long-term planning. Jan Smigielski has been working as a silvicultural forester with MFLI since 2000 and his job is to develop site-specific forest operation prescriptions showing exactly how particular blocks are to be prepared for harvesting. Smigielski said that the most challenging part of his work is also what makes it the most exciting: dealing with the natural complexity of the area. “The natural bio-diversity of this area challenges you in such a way that you can not do anything uniformly. You have to develop prescriptions on a very small scale. First you have to identify the different patches of eco-systems and address them accordingly,” he said. The companies working with the MLFI supply mostly maple, oak and poplar to a variety of local buyers within a 100-150 km radius and they primarily sell pulpwood, firewood, and saw logs. Matthew Mertins, who is planning and operations forester with MLFI, said that he is currently working on a forest plan for April 1, 2016 through to March 31, 2021, a plan that will detail all of the operations that will happen during that period including the locations of the harvesting blocks and renewal areas, and that will also include the various types of protections put in place for wildlife and other natural features, which the public want to see protected. “The whole idea behind the planning is to make sure that we know where we are doing the forestry operations while having the appropriate safeguards in place to make sure that the operations have no negative impacts on human activity and enjoyment and wildlife. The whole idea behind forest management is that you can run sustainable forestry operations while other things are going on around it. Cottaging and wild life can occur simultaneously as long as you strike the right balance,” Mertins said. According to recent statistics put out by the MNR, 450 people are directly employed by forest operations on the MLFI's management area, proving that the industry is a large employer in the area. Staff said that in an effort to keep the public informed about the current MLFI plans and operations, they are in the process of launching a new website that should be up and running by the end of this week. The site will include information about the business, its staff, its operations, along with profiles about the shareholders, and information about the local businesses working with MLFI with links to their websites as well as links to the MNR's forest management plans for the area. You can find the new website by googling Mazinaw Lanark Forest Inc.