Editorials

Editorial: Musings on too hot a day

Written by  |  Thursday, 19 July 2012 11:09  |  Published in Editorials
Editorial by Jeff Green I resisted the temptation to write an editorial about the hot weather, because I know nothing more about the heat than anyone else. Then again, if knowing more about a topic than others know is a prerequisite for writing about it, I would probably write about one editorial every five years. Nontheless, I have two short items this week that might be semi-topical if not semi-tropical Road closing will wreak havoc on commuters, tourists, next week Central Frontenac Township will be re-routing all northbound and southbound traffic between Parham and Sharbot Lake to Long Lake Road between midnight on Tuesday, July 24 and 2:00 pm on Thursday, July 26. That will add at least 30 minutes each way for commuters between…

Editorial: Garbage – what's a township to do?

Written by  |  Friday, 01 June 2012 11:06  |  Published in Editorials
Editorial by Jeff Green Everybody is up in arms. Well not everybody, but some people - and those people are really up in arms - about the new clear bag garbage system in Central Frontenac. People have said a lot about the clear bags: they are unworkable; they are an invasion of privacy; it is unfair that the old bag tags can't be used any more. The whole fiasco demonstrates that the township is out of touch with the people. Why would a township council impose something like this on its residents? There is a reason. The recycling rates in Central Frontenac are abysmal. They are very low compared to all of its neighbors, and the township has been facing pressure from the provincial government…

You can’t do what Clayton did

Written by  |  Thursday, 24 May 2012 11:05  |  Published in Editorials
Editorial by Jeff Green When Bud Clayton was elected mayor of North Frontenac I asked him if he was going to step down from the Pine Meadow Nursing Home management committee. He said that as soon as the shovel was in the ground for the rebuild of Pine Meadow, he would be resigning from the committee. Eighteen months later the shovel still isn’t in the ground, although that should happen within a few days. The reason that I asked Clayton about this is because Pine Meadow provides service for residents of North Frontenac, and the mayor of North Frontenac would be wise to sever ties with specific agencies that have a direct relationship with the township. I took it that he understood this when he…

Editorial: Don't Ask MNR for a Straight Answer

Written by  |  Thursday, 26 April 2012 11:01  |  Published in Editorials
Editorial by Jeff Green A couple of weeks ago, we ran an article called “Deputy Minister sees diminished role for MNR”. The article was based on the transcript of a video statement by David O’Toole, the Deputy Minister of Natural Resources, that was viewed by staff throughout the ministry in the wake of the provincial budget, a budget that has now been approved by the Ontario legislature. The statement raised a number of questions, and I attempted to get some clarity from the ministry. I waited seven days, but when I received the response last week from the communications department at the ministry, I’m afraid I found it less than forthcoming about the ministries real plans. One of the key questions I asked was what…

Editorial: Occupy Lanark

Written by  |  Thursday, 26 January 2012 05:09  |  Published in Editorials
Editorial by Jeff Green When the Occupy movement, as it has come to be known, sprung up in New York as a kind of North American response to the Arab Spring last summer, I, for one, looked at it as an urban phenomenon. Even the slogan about the 1% who have so much and the 99% who have so much less is a bit of an urban concept to me, because while there are rich and poor in our rural communities I don’t see the kind of tension that would spring up into a movement. The difference between rich and poor is only one of the differences we have to bridge in rural communities, and we are more likely to look at an urban/rural split.…

Policing: What do we get for the money?

Written by  |  Thursday, 19 January 2012 05:07  |  Published in Editorials
Editorial by Jeff Green About once every 12 to 18 months, Inspector Gerry Salisbury, the Commander of the Lanark County Detachment of the OPP, makes an appearance at a meeting of Central Frontenac Council. Each time, he brings a set of statistics about the activities of the Sharbot Lake sub-detachment, and each time he makes the same commitment, to come to meetings on a quarterly basis to keep the townships in the loop. Then he leaves. Each year the OPP requisitions more money from Central and North Frontenac for what is called “status quo” policing, a system whereby the OPP determines what level of policing is required and also determines how much the policing will cost. This year the increase is about $60,000 for Central…

Editorial:The Good Life

Written by  |  Thursday, 22 December 2011 07:08  |  Published in Editorials
The Good Life Editorial by Jeff Green Normally every year we print 50 issues of the Frontenac News and then take two weeks off for Christmas and New Year’s. Every few years, because of the way the weeks line up, we put out a 51st paper before having our annual holiday. That’s what happened this year, and although you wouldn’t think it should matter that much if you add one week to 50, it makes a psychological difference. When I trudged down to Glenburnie for the December Frontenac County Council meeting last Wednesday morning I was certainly feeling it. It was the day after issue number 50, and my body wanted to be on holiday, but I had no one to blame but myself for…

Comparing Apples to Subsidized Apples

Written by  |  Thursday, 15 December 2011 07:07  |  Published in Editorials
Editorial by Jeff Green It seems to me that it is inevitable that planning services in Central and North Frontenac will be done by the Frontenac County Planning Department as of sometime early in 2012. In recent presentations to both townships, the County Planner, Joe Gallivan, said that costs will be about half of what they are now for developers and private citizens in need of zoning bylaw amendments, plans of subdivisions, and the like. For the townships’ own needs, the county is offering free service. It looks like a huge win - win situation for everyone. Joe Gallivan said that he expects it will take about 500 to 650 hours per year of work to handle all of the planning that would be required…

Recreation the key to longer, healthier living

Written by  |  Thursday, 24 November 2011 07:06  |  Published in Editorials
It is unusual to hear doctors talk about the limitations of their profession. Dr. Andrew Pipe is well known for his work developing smoking cessation programs, for his role as head of cardiac prevention and rehabilitation at the University of Ottawa Heart Institute, and for work with elite athletes in the Commonwealth and Olympic games. As part of the message he delivered as the keynote speaker at a Recreation Summit in Smiths Falls last week, he talked about the relative effects of social factors on levels of health as compared to the impact of the health care system. From a historical perspective, he pointed out that as the result of social factors, including improvements in hygiene and safe drinking water, tuberculosis rates in North America…

Tar Sands sit in Op-Ed

Written by  |  Thursday, 13 October 2011 08:04  |  Published in Editorials
The problem with civil disobedience is that it is a blatant defiance of the “rules” and in a generally moral, law-abiding society like the one we Canadians enjoy, abiding by the rules is ingrained and defiance is seen as counterproductive rebelliousness or mindless insolence perpetrated by misfits or hotheads and not to be countenanced.  But therein lies the conundrum: What happens when the law comes into conflict with the higher moral code that we all share. Civil disobedience becomes a moral obligation in times of great injustice. It has an honourable history throughout the ages. We in Frontenac had our own local experience with officially sanctioned injustice when the Uranium mining controversy just north of Sharbot Lake boiled over a couple of years ago. The…

Editorial: Using Hillier to beat up on us

Written by  |  Thursday, 06 October 2011 08:04  |  Published in Editorials
Editorial by Jeff Green Reading through the coverage of the provincial election that will end its dreary run today, one of the sideshows has been a number of articles in both the Ottawa Citizen and the Globe and Mail about LFL&A incumbent Randy Hillier. The Globe and Mail even dispatched a columnist, John Ibbitson, to interview Hillier supporters in Carleton Place and Hopetown. The resulting article “Meet Hudak's booming - but minimized - voice of rural Ontario” poses and then rejects the idea that a comparison can be drawn between Randy Hillier and Lanark Landowner supporters and the Tea Party movement in the United States. Here is an excerpt from that article that caught my attention. “The truth is, there is no discernible Tea Party…

MacDonald is swimming against the current, but how strong is it?

Written by  |  Thursday, 15 September 2011 08:03  |  Published in Editorials
Editorial Jeff Green Liberal candidate Bill MacDonald has been preparing for the provincial election campaign that is now underway for at least four years, and he is putting everything he has into it. But in electoral politics the local campaign is usually limited in its impact on the election because people trend towards political parties based on the leaders’ campaigns and sometimes on crude but effective advertising. There are a number of polling companies working on this campaign, and as well as tracking voter intentions regionally and province-wide, some riding-by-riding predictions have also been made. Conservative MPP Randy Hillier received just under 2% more votes than Liberal Ian Wilson last time around (40.58% to 38.76%), a margin of 820 votes. So, as Bill MacDonald put…

Editorial: Energy Policy is about more than Hydro Rates

Written by  |  Thursday, 01 September 2011 08:02  |  Published in Editorials
Editorial by Jeff Green Energy policy will be a major theme in the coming provin-cial election. The Conservative Party has been making the cost of hydro a major thrust of their pre-election banter, but aside from a commitment to cutting the HST from hydro bills, and scrapping the Liberals’ Green Energy Act and smart hydro metres, we are still waiting for something from the Conservatives on the really big energy question fac-ing Ontario – how will the province’s future energy needs be secured? According to the party website, the coal fired electrical plants that remain in operation in Ontario will finally be eliminated in 2014. As the statement on the website rightly points out, this is something that the Liberals have failed to do over…

Editorial: I Didn't Know Jack

Written by  |  Thursday, 25 August 2011 08:02  |  Published in Editorials
Jack Layton: A Tribute This Guy Knew Jack I didn’t know Jack By Jeff Green Anyone who has gone through a cancer death in their own family - and that is almost everyone it seems - took a deep breath when Jack Layton appeared in public a few weeks ago to announce he was taking a leave of absence from his duties as NDP leader. Although no one wanted to say it, even in the media, there was widespread fear that he was dying of cancer, and indeed it turned out that was the case. Somehow the death of Jack Layton, who is a stranger to most of us, is being taken like the death of a relative, not a close relative, but like the…

One More Reason to Loath End of Summer - Editorial

Written by  |  Thursday, 11 August 2011 08:01  |  Published in Editorials
We are now well into the Dog Days of summer. The weather is still hot, and we really don’t want to have to think about the cold weather to come. But deep inside we know summer will end. So even if we don’t act right away we are starting to think about preparing for winter. Thoughts like “Is there enough wood in the pile?” and “Should I start cutting a bit on cooler days?” or “Should I call to get the furnace looked at before too long?” are popping into our brains as we sit on the porch at the end of another hot summer day. There is something else we are faced with this year, and it will come about before any of the…
 

News From Across Frontenac

Click Here for More