Notes and quotes from the 13th annual Frontenac Heritage Festival

Written by  Wednesday, 20 February 2019 12:34
Rate this item
(0 votes)
Will he sink? Rev. Jonathan Askwith won best costume at the Polar Plunge at the Sharbot Lake Marina Sunday. Contrary to speculation amongst the crowd, he wasn’t able to walk on water and sunk beneath the surface just like everybody else. Photo/Craig Bakay Will he sink? Rev. Jonathan Askwith won best costume at the Polar Plunge at the Sharbot Lake Marina Sunday. Contrary to speculation amongst the crowd, he wasn’t able to walk on water and sunk beneath the surface just like everybody else. Photo/Craig Bakay

• Depending on whom you talked to, there seemed to be some confusion as to the actual name of the Festival mascot, as well as what it actually is. We’re going with “Hairy Fest” and will tell you that there was more than one person wearing the costume over the weekend (at least Cindy Kelsey and Joan Hollywood).

• Coun. Bill MacDonald during his welcoming speech Saturday in Arden: “Reg Peterson always asks me when he gets something new if I know what it is — as if I’m old enough to have used one.”

• Still with MacDonald, his “Lumber Camp Lingo” sheet was a big hit at Railway Heritage Park. Some of the more colourful terms included Pants Rabbits (lice), The Office (outhouse) and Timber!! (watch out for falling tree).

• Rev. Jonathan Askwith emerging from underneath the frigid water during the Polar Plunge couldn’t resist a bit of preaching, loudly exclaiming “Jesus Christ!”

• Still with the Polar Plunge, a total of $2,796 was raised — $1,125 for the Treasure Trunk, $930 for the Fire Department and $731 for Adult Connections. Karen Burke once again was the oldest plunger, having been in eight of the nine plunges. The only year she missed was the winter she broke her leg skiing. Riley Merrigan raised the most money individually and Owen McEwen was the youngest plunger.

• Janet Barr said that this is the last year for the Treasure Trunk and Northern Connections to be beneficiaries of the plunge funds. “Next year, we’ll be looking for two new worthy recipients,” she said.

• Crokicurl made its debut at this year’s Frontenac Heritage Festival, although the Sharbot Lake version didn’t include coloured rings. However, one thing that’s apparent is that this is a uniquely Canadian game, having first been played at The Forks Market in Winnipeg in January of 2016. There is documentation that the game has also been played in Saskatoon, Calgary, Regina, Guelph, Penetanguishene and Fort St. John.

Submit to DeliciousSubmit to DiggSubmit to FacebookSubmit to Google PlusSubmit to StumbleuponSubmit to TechnoratiSubmit to TwitterSubmit to LinkedIn

More News From Central Frontenac

Click Here for More
 

More News From Central Frontenac

Click Here for More

News From Across Frontenac

Click Here for More